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Setting up a VPN start->finish

Last response: in Networking
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June 10, 2010 6:04:59 PM

I recently acquired a new job some 100 miles from where I currently am employed. I can keep working part time at this job if I can setup a VPN for remote access (hopefully using remote desktop connection) to work on the systems here.

I've been googling around to no avail so I figured asking here couldn't hurt.

Here's how I currently have the network setup:

Cable Modem (with static IP) this modem has 4 ports

Linksys WRT54G2 Wireless Router

Netgear 24port "Smart" Switch

Server running Server 2003 R2 Standard (I installed an extra NIC) Serving as a fileserver, domain controller, DNS Server, DHCP Server

4 Staff computers running Win XP Pro

5 Patron computers running Win XP Pro

A number of receipt printers connected to staff machines

1 network printer

----

The server (with it's onboard ethernet) as well as all the computers and printer are connected(wired) to the 24port switch, which then connects to the router, and then the modem.

Would it be best to connect my server(through the extra NIC installed) to the modem(as it has 3 extra ports) and bypass the router?

I don't need a dedicated connection just for the VPN do I?

----

When trying to connect to the VPN am I just using the static IP address given to the business here?


I know it's alot but thanks in advance guys,

Mike


P.S. Security best-practices aren't much of an issue as this is for a not for profit business that doesn't deal much in the way of personal information

P.S.S.

Help with the settings in Routing and Remote Access would be a great help.
June 10, 2010 6:26:52 PM

pinkeyes said:
I recently acquired a new job some 100 miles from where I currently am employed. I can keep working part time at this job if I can setup a VPN for remote access (hopefully using remote desktop connection) to work on the systems here.

I've been googling around to no avail so I figured asking here couldn't hurt.

Here's how I currently have the network setup:

Cable Modem (with static IP) this modem has 4 ports

Linksys WRT54G2 Wireless Router

Netgear 24port "Smart" Switch

Server running Server 2003 R2 Standard (I installed an extra NIC) Serving as a fileserver, domain controller, DNS Server, DHCP Server

4 Staff computers running Win XP Pro

5 Patron computers running Win XP Pro

A number of receipt printers connected to staff machines

1 network printer

----

The server (with it's onboard ethernet) as well as all the computers and printer are connected(wired) to the 24port switch, which then connects to the router, and then the modem.

Would it be best to connect my server(through the extra NIC installed) to the modem(as it has 3 extra ports) and bypass the router?

I don't need a dedicated connection just for the VPN do I?

----

When trying to connect to the VPN am I just using the static IP address given to the business here?


I know it's alot but thanks in advance guys,

Mike


P.S. Security best-practices aren't much of an issue as this is for a not for profit business that doesn't deal much in the way of personal information



How to Configure

1. Open Network Connections in Control Panel
1. Click Start then Control Panel
2. Click Network and Internet Connections (skip if not there)
3. Click Network Connections
2. Click Create a new connection under Network Tasks in the left column then Next
3. Select Connect to the network at my workplace then Next
4. Select Virtual Private Network connection then Next
5. Type CompanyVPN in the Company Name box then Next (CompanyVPN is just a name I came up with, choose your own name)
6. Enter your company IP address or domain name in the Host Name field then Next
7. Select "My Use Only" if this is only for your Windows' user account, or "Anyone's Use" if there are other Windows' accounts that should have access to this VPN.
8. Click Add a shortcut to have a CompanyVPN shortcut added to your desktop
9. Click Finish

How to Connect

1. Double Click the CompanyVPN icon on your desktop or click Start, Connect To, CompanyVPN
2. Type your Username and Password in their respective fields
3. Click Connect
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June 10, 2010 6:32:04 PM

Thanks for the reply but I need help setting up the VPN on the server, not connecting to a VPN.
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June 10, 2010 6:35:57 PM

Aww.. I noticed I'm out of time, have to get to work. This answer is a bit incomplete. I'll prepare more and get back here. I was working on what to do on the "Company" side.

If anyone else wants to help Pinkeyes while I'm gone, have at it.
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June 11, 2010 4:21:28 PM

pinkeyes said:
I recently acquired a new job some 100 miles from where I currently am employed. I can keep working part time at this job if I can setup a VPN for remote access (hopefully using remote desktop connection) to work on the systems here.

<snip>

The server (with it's onboard ethernet) as well as all the computers and printer are connected(wired) to the 24port switch, which then connects to the router, and then the modem.

Would it be best to connect my server(through the extra NIC installed) to the modem(as it has 3 extra ports) and bypass the router?
No, I'd deal with one master router

I don't need a dedicated connection just for the VPN do I?
You want the VPN to be routed to use all office resources, so come in the front door using Static IP

----

When trying to connect to the VPN am I just using the static IP address given to the business here?
Should work, VPN host installed in Server.

I know it's alot but thanks in advance guys,

Mike


P.S. Security best-practices aren't much of an issue as this is for a not for profit business that doesn't deal much in the way of personal information
I assume "Best Practices" means no industrial-strength firewalls and gateways will be used, but username and passwords are a must.

P.S.S.

Help with the settings in Routing and Remote Access would be a great help.
This comes with being able to sit there and do the local configuration. However, if everything is connected correctly, it should work.


The cable modem apparently has a router and 4 port switch. You could dump the wireless router if there are no wireless computers in the network, otherwise you'll need to keep the wireless router in system, and may as well use it as "the router."




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June 11, 2010 4:54:32 PM

The router is going need a port opened for your VPN to be able to get in. You may want to use port 80 to keep it simple, or use another port such as 6699(TCP). Your VPN client will need to log in using that port, no big deal, just add a colon and the port number after the address. Of course your VPN host will need to be listening on that same port.
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June 12, 2010 11:18:34 AM

Interesting, but since my server has 2 ethernet cards couldn't it connect to the router (to manage the local network) and the cable modem as well for the vpn?

Should both network cards go to the router?

Should I even use both? Or just one?
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June 12, 2010 9:05:59 PM

It's just that Windows gets so picky about what it does to make network connections work. Using two NIC's sometimes requires one connect before the other, or the one will get used exclusively and the other gets ignored. People go bald pulling their hair out from problems like this. Using a single card and letting the router do the work is just simpler, and it also makes sure everything gets routed. It would be a real bummer to have it all work sort of... except one computer never gets routed and is therefore stranded due to lack of connectivity.
Your idea of one card going to cable modem and the other to the router sounds good in theory. Let's see if the VPN gets routed to see the other office resources. It only takes a minute to swap cables, so have a go at it.
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October 20, 2010 3:50:09 PM

isn't your modem a combo modem/router? all the ones i have had comcast verizon now fios are they can be accessed wired or wireless i assume they run in bridged mode ergo 1 cable
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