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Just built a PC - i7 950 running at 100 right out of the box

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  • CPUs
  • Intel i7
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March 20, 2011 12:22:39 AM

It idles at 40-50 but gets up to 100 in all four cores within several seconds when I run prime95. I'm using the stock cooler but it shouldn't be that bad right? This is scaring me. No overclocking, all stock bios settings. I don't think I did anything wrong. The case is a Silverstone fp-02 with the three bottom fans turned on high. This is abnormal and completely fubar right? Anybody know what it could possibly be? I've already taken off teh heat sink to make sure it's seated correctly - it is.

More about : built 950 running 100 box

March 20, 2011 12:29:42 AM

Yeah, 100C is pretty high. I would just slap on an aftermarket cooler just for piece of mind. My CM Hyper 212 cost just $27....
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March 20, 2011 12:54:40 AM

I checked the seating twice - it really is seated correctly.
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a b à CPUs
March 20, 2011 1:27:24 AM

Did it come with TIM we ordered some parts for my friend last week got the I7 950 in and it had no TIM we ended up using some artic silver I had. i mean that seems like a stupid question but you never know.
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March 20, 2011 1:48:05 AM

Your stock heatsink should not be running your cpu that high. I know it has been said all ready but make sure the 4 pins in the heatsink are locked in.
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March 20, 2011 3:50:07 AM

Thanks guys. You're all probably right; I replaced the stock heat sink with a $20 heat sink hastily purchased from Best Buy and I'm running Prime95 as we speak at a stable 55 degrees. I'm really not sure what the original problem was. I probably mis-applied the thermal paste. Actually my CPU didn't come with thermal paste, and the instructions did not mention it at all, but I did have some on there. I wasn't careful with it though. I'm surprised it made such a huge difference.

I did run my CPU for probably a half hour at probably 100 degrees, before I thought to check temperatures. Do you think that did any appreciable damage?
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March 20, 2011 3:52:05 AM

The CPU did come with thermal paste, actually. It was on the bottom of the stock heatsink.
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March 20, 2011 3:57:00 AM

I bought a Megahalems originally, and it did come with paste. Unfortunately I over-tightened something when installing the megahalems, so had to remove it and use the stock. I didn't re-apply any paste when I did so, because the CPU still had the layer of paste from the megahalems install. But I guess that didn't work out so well.

When I installed my new Corsair A70 tonight, I wiped all the paste remnants from the CPU and started over with the paste included with the A70. That seems to have done it. The original problem was almost certainly about the TIM.
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March 20, 2011 3:58:23 AM

cjl said:
The CPU did come with thermal paste, actually. It was on the bottom of the stock heatsink.


Not sure what you mean - didn't see anything on there. You mean some micro-thin layer of paste pre-applied at the factory?

In any case, I put the stock heat sink on top of a pre-existing layer of paste left over from my failed installation of the megahalems. I figured that would have been good enough and am still surprised that it wasn't.
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March 20, 2011 5:32:26 AM

omgtifb said:
Not sure what you mean - didn't see anything on there. You mean some micro-thin layer of paste pre-applied at the factory?

In any case, I put the stock heat sink on top of a pre-existing layer of paste left over from my failed installation of the megahalems. I figured that would have been good enough and am still surprised that it wasn't.

Nope.

It's the grey stuff applied in three stripes:

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March 20, 2011 5:49:36 AM

omgtifb said:
Not sure what you mean - didn't see anything on there. You mean some micro-thin layer of paste pre-applied at the factory?

In any case, I put the stock heat sink on top of a pre-existing layer of paste left over from my failed installation of the megahalems. I figured that would have been good enough and am still surprised that it wasn't.



If you put the stock heatsink onto the processor, with leftover thermal paste from another heatsink, and without taking the pre-applied thermal paste off the stock heatsink, I'm not at all surprised it didn't work out too well.


You always clean off your CPU and heatsink, then apply a new, even and thin layer of TIM onto your processor. There are a variety of ways not doing this can cause problems.


In your case your thermal paste may have dried out, and very likely had an uneven spread. Either of those things can cause pretty large temperature changes.

Just remember to clean both your heatsink and CPU off before applying TIM in the future, and don't use too much.
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March 20, 2011 8:20:59 AM

omgtifb said:
Thanks guys. You're all probably right; I replaced the stock heat sink with a $20 heat sink hastily purchased from Best Buy and I'm running Prime95 as we speak at a stable 55 degrees. I'm really not sure what the original problem was. I probably mis-applied the thermal paste. Actually my CPU didn't come with thermal paste, and the instructions did not mention it at all, but I did have some on there. I wasn't careful with it though. I'm surprised it made such a huge difference.

I did run my CPU for probably a half hour at probably 100 degrees, before I thought to check temperatures. Do you think that did any appreciable damage?



100c is very hot, 90 is already critical, so be thankful you taught about it half an hour, if you continued using it longer with that temp then it will fail.
the maximum temperature is the temp the cpu can work without burning. The lower the cpu temperature, the better.
Good quality CPU coolers and the correct use of thermal grease will make your CPU to work way below its maximum rated temperature.
When the CPU works above the maximum admissible temperature set by its manufacturer, the following problems can occur.
-Reduction of CPU life-span
-Random freezes
-Random resets
other cases of PCs giving the infamous Blue Screen of Death while you are loading or installing the operating system because the CPU is overheated. Another typical overheating scenario is the computer working correctly and then after some time it starts to malfunction.
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March 21, 2011 5:13:24 PM

Best answer selected by omgtifb.
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a b à CPUs
March 22, 2011 8:52:23 PM

Yes there should have been a pre applied pad of interface material on the heat sink like the photo above but like I said the one we got had none at all.
Using the old and if there was a pad on the heat sink would have made gaps between the cpu and the sink thats probably why you had issues.
I think Tjmax is 105 on the 950 so you probably stressed it pretty good it may end up being ok though i hope it works out for you.
I guess this should be considered a lesson learned about TIM application.
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