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sharpen vs unsharp mask & proper usage.

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Anonymous
January 23, 2005 8:12:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Question on sharpening. I have a choice of various sharpen levels,
including directional, plus a couple levels of Unsharp Mask, and
Unsharp Mask Gaussian in the program I mainly use for light image
processing, ThumbsPlus. I also have Photoshop Elements, which I use
when TP can't handle the job.

Now, I've read here that most digital images can benefit from
sharpening. I mainly use the Gaussian version.

However, I've been wondering - when is it appropriate to use sharpen, as
opposed to an unsharp mask? When is Gaussian not a good idea (and how
is it different than the regular version?) Which one is better to try
to fix a slightly motion-blurred image, as opposed to a slightly
out-of-focus image? When would a directional sharpen work?

If I have a photo with noise that needs to be sharpened, do I sharpen
first then reduce noise, or vice versa?

If there's a place I can go to read about this, please point me there.

Appreciate your help.
January 23, 2005 8:12:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Charles Schuler wrote:

> This might help you:
>
> http://www.russellbrown.com/images/tips_movies/Advanced...

I'll have to check that out. Those video tutorials are great.

My understanding is 'regular' sharpening is just a generic light sharpen
that normally works fine. If it's not OK, use unsharp mask & set a
radius of just 1/3 to maybe three pixels & intensity of around 300. I
never messed with threshold.

Zoom in to 800% (control-plus) so you can see exactly what's happening
and you will understand intuitively while playing with the sliders.

Sharpening is always done last as it will otherwise emphasize the noise
or colors you are trying to adjust away. It needs to be done for each
time you reduce (even thumbnails) though it's not clear to me there is
any damage in sharpening the large one then re-shaprening for web/email
versions it perhaps is not ideal.
January 24, 2005 1:13:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sharpening should be the very last thing you do. Have the image preped for
final output before sharpening and save a version that is not sharpened so
you can go back if you are going to o to a different output.

--
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
The Improved Links Pages are at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

"jmc" <NOnewsgroupsSPAM@NOjodiBODY.HOMEus> wrote in message
news:35i485F4nmcqcU1@individual.net...
> Question on sharpening. I have a choice of various sharpen levels,
> including directional, plus a couple levels of Unsharp Mask, and
> Unsharp Mask Gaussian in the program I mainly use for light image
> processing, ThumbsPlus. I also have Photoshop Elements, which I use
> when TP can't handle the job.
>
> Now, I've read here that most digital images can benefit from
> sharpening. I mainly use the Gaussian version.
>
> However, I've been wondering - when is it appropriate to use sharpen, as
> opposed to an unsharp mask? When is Gaussian not a good idea (and how
> is it different than the regular version?) Which one is better to try
> to fix a slightly motion-blurred image, as opposed to a slightly
> out-of-focus image? When would a directional sharpen work?
>
> If I have a photo with noise that needs to be sharpened, do I sharpen
> first then reduce noise, or vice versa?
>
> If there's a place I can go to read about this, please point me there.
>
> Appreciate your help.
!