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Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?

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Anonymous
May 3, 2005 3:39:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.

I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
about to come in.

If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call or
text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever you
are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.

Anyone else notice this?


--

- Jonathan

FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
Added February 2005!
Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 3:39:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"£ Î Z @ R Ð" <jattea@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:XbadnWsDr6KuBurfRVn-qw@adelphia.com...
>I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.
>
> I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
> around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
> about to come in.
>
> If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call or
> text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever
> you
> are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.
>
> Anyone else notice this?

that happens with all GSM phones... nothing to get alarmed about.

hell, dazzle your friends when you know the phone is gonna ring before it
actually does!

how's the service working out for you?
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 6:08:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

> that happens with all GSM phones... nothing to get alarmed about.
>
> hell, dazzle your friends when you know the phone is gonna ring before it
> actually does!
>
> how's the service working out for you?

stop following me.

Ah, GSM. so it's a cingular thing, not a RAZR thing? Got it. I've been a
sprint guy for five years...

Service is pretty good. I think Cingular has better coverage in my area
(i.e., it works well in my living room and basement when sprint didn't), but
i experience more occasional static than i did with sprint, almost like
Analog static.


--

- Jonathan

FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
Added February 2005!
Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.



"MacDog" <macdog@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:AlNde.31524$Jg7.1284@fe03.lga...
> "£ Î Z @ R Ð" <jattea@adelphia.net> wrote in message
> news:XbadnWsDr6KuBurfRVn-qw@adelphia.com...
>>I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.
>>
>> I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
>> around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
>> about to come in.
>>
>> If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call
>> or
>> text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever
>> you
>> are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.
>>
>> Anyone else notice this?
>
> that happens with all GSM phones... nothing to get alarmed about.
>
> hell, dazzle your friends when you know the phone is gonna ring before it
> actually does!
>
> how's the service working out for you?
>
Related resources
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Anonymous
May 4, 2005 3:28:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Susan wrote:
> I get this with my TDMA phone (nokia 3560) i think this is the nature
of
> cellular. about to get my motorola 551 TOMORROW!!
>
> --
This is a nice device, and since the motorola v551 is a smartphone, we
tested and found it works great with an Internet connection and our s/w
from Orb Networks - and it's free. If you run this s/w on your
broadband connected XP PC, you'll be able to see and/or hear any of
your content on your phone like your music, videos, your photos and
even live TV (if you have a tuner in your PC). It streams this to
other devices too, any internet connected PC, PDA, etc...
May 4, 2005 8:19:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

I get this with my TDMA phone (nokia 3560) i think this is the nature of
cellular. about to get my motorola 551 TOMORROW!!

--
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 1:12:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Once and for all...

This interference is a result of the frequencies used by GSM. If your GSM
handset is near the audio device (speaker phone, stereo, mp3 player or
almost anything with a speaker), you're going to get these sounds whenever
the handset transmits. This occurs periodically when the handset and the
cell site "handshake". That is, the cell site interrogates all handsets
within range and exchanges a small amount of data. Something like (cell
site) "..whomever is out there, identify yourself?". (handset) "...I'm
here and available. My number is xxx-xxx-xxxx".

Also, when someone calls your cellphone, the cell site broadcasts a data
stream to all handsets, looking for yours. Your handset then transmits a
short burst of data, identifying itself. (this is why you can sometimes
tell when the cell phone is about to ring). Then the cell site sends a
ringing signal and your handset rings.

During the time you're talking, the handset is transmitting, so the
interference continues.

Generally, all GSM handsets should cause about the same amount of
interference. The variables are; 1) distance between the handset and the
audio device, 2) shielding of audio components inside the device being
interfered with.
****************************************************************************
***
Since this question comes up about once every 2 - 3 days here, let's just
copy and repost it occasionally.

"£ Î Z @ R Ð" <jattea@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:XbadnWsDr6KuBurfRVn-qw@adelphia.com...
> I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.
>
> I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
> around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
> about to come in.
>
> If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call or
> text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever
you
> are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.
>
> Anyone else notice this?
>
>
> --
>
> - Jonathan
>
> FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
> Added February 2005!
> Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
> hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
> the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 4:55:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular,alt.cellular.motorola (More info?)

Mike S. wrote:

> Why? Because the relevant "frequencies" are the width and spacing of the
> data bursts, not so much the radio carrier frequencies.
>
> Here is a relevant posting from the early days:

For those who don't want to wade through a long, old post, here's the
short and relevant version:

- GSM operates using a sginalling schemed known as TDMA - Time Division
Multiple access. This means that on the network, conversations are
multiplexed by dividing each digital stream into time slots. Each
digital packet of a conversation is ompressed and sent on its specific
time slot, and no other.

To facilitate this, a GSM or TDMA phone (including Nextel handsets)
operate by transmitting in rapid data bursts - on and off pulses. It is
these rapid on-of pulses that cause the interference that we perceive as
buzzing or ticking noises in speakers, flickering of monitors, and other
interference related problems.

CDMA phones (Code Division Mutiple Access) DO interfere with
electronics just as GSM and TDMA phones do. The difference is that CDMA
multiplexes its conversations via a different method. In CDMA, the
conversation is broken up by spectrum segments, and various parts of the
code is broadcast over different sections of a wideband channel.
Instead of on-off pulses, what appears to be a continuous tranmission
(that also looks a lot like random noise if you don't have the correct
"signal mask" to decode the transmission) is broadcast. Most
electronics can cope with this better than a pulsed transmission, and so
the effects aren't perceived as much.


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