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Okay to keep laptop plugged in?

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February 20, 2005 1:42:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi,

I have a Sony Vaio laptop (about three years old) that at times I do
not use for a while. Is it okay to leave the unit turned off and
plugged in when not in use (could be for 2 to 3 weeks at a time). Any
damage to the battery? Unit is totally off with no lights showing.

Thanks.

More about : laptop plugged

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 20, 2005 2:34:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

anon wrote:

>Hi,
>
>I have a Sony Vaio laptop (about three years old) that at times I do
>not use for a while. Is it okay to leave the unit turned off and
>plugged in when not in use (could be for 2 to 3 weeks at a time). Any
>damage to the battery? Unit is totally off with no lights showing.
>
>Thanks.
>
>
I don't think there is a definitive answer to that. Some say it is
harmful to keep the unit plugged in and the batteries in the unit,
others will say otherwise. I keep my batteries in and the unit plugged
in when I am not using it. The batteries are over two years old and are
losing charge faster. If your batteries are three years old, whatever
you are doing is working well.

There does seem to be agreement that LI batteries have a limited number
of discharge/recharge cycles (about 300?). So not using the batteries
when you don't have to seems a good thing to do.
February 20, 2005 7:26:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

anon <anon@nowhere.com> wrote:
: Hi,

: I have a Sony Vaio laptop (about three years old) that at times I do
: not use for a while. Is it okay to leave the unit turned off and
: plugged in when not in use (could be for 2 to 3 weeks at a time). Any
: damage to the battery? Unit is totally off with no lights showing.

Even though there are not lights on you mean the battery is charging,
right?

Conventional wisdom is that you should not leave the laptop plugged in
for an extended period with battery or you will eventually ruin the
battery. I was told this when I bought my Toshiba laptop, I ignored
it, and two years later my battery that used to last two hours last 20
minutes if I am lucky. I finally went back and read the user's manual
and Toshiba explicitly says not to leave the laptop plugged in for
more than eight hours (I think) if you are not using it or you'll ruin
battery life. So check your owner's manual - there is probably
something in there about that. You might simply want to remove the
battery while the machine is plugged in.

If your battery is still holding a good charge after three years, I'd
say that's pretty good but your battery might not last a whole lot
longer no matter what you do.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
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----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 20, 2005 8:37:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Just get a power bar with a switch on it. That way you just have to flip
the switch instead of plugging/unplugging the power cord.

Cheers,
Lawrence
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 12:13:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Unplug it! I have a 2 year old Sony Vaio FXA49, and the battery is shot
from just sitting around plugged in.

And sony's batterys arn't cheap. (well is anything they make cheap???
lol) Sony Direct will set you back a good 200 bucks.

Sess
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 6:41:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I'd recommend removing the battery, and consider getting an inexpensive
UPS. While this sounds convoluted, the battery may well cost over $200,
and experience suggests that you may ruin it relatively quickly (1 to 2
years) leaving it in all the time, while you can get a quality (APC)
UPS, 350 VA or similar, for $30 or less on sale (sometimes even "free
after rebate").


anon wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I have a Sony Vaio laptop (about three years old) that at times I do
> not use for a while. Is it okay to leave the unit turned off and
> plugged in when not in use (could be for 2 to 3 weeks at a time). Any
> damage to the battery? Unit is totally off with no lights showing.
>
> Thanks.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 6:44:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

If he's only going to be using it on AC power, this won't save the
battery from any damage that would occur, and won't really accomplish
anything.


Lawrence wrote:

> Just get a power bar with a switch on it. That way you just have to flip
> the switch instead of plugging/unplugging the power cord.
>
> Cheers,
> Lawrence
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 9:24:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Sess wrote:

> Unplug it! I have a 2 year old Sony Vaio FXA49, and the battery is shot
> from just sitting around plugged in.
>
> And sony's batterys arn't cheap. (well is anything they make cheap???
> lol) Sony Direct will set you back a good 200 bucks.
>
> Sess

yea, Sony has to ad 50 to 100% to their prices because of their name. also,
Sony is one of the 6 media conglomerates in the world that owns many
newpapers, magazines, movie studios, TV stations, etc. i believe they're
products are overpriced. you can get something just as good or better by
getting another brand. but as you know, image is everything in the TV
generation.

---rp
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 12:51:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>>>>> "Barry" == Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:

Barry> I'd recommend removing the battery, and consider getting an
Barry> inexpensive UPS. While this sounds convoluted, the battery may
Barry> well cost over $200, and experience suggests that you may ruin
Barry> it relatively quickly (1 to 2 years) leaving it in all the
Barry> time, while you can get a quality (APC) UPS, 350 VA or
Barry> similar, for $30 or less on sale (sometimes even "free after
Barry> rebate").

Why the ups? Just to protect the laptop. So if the battery is removed
it will last longer? I have been trying to find an answer to this
question for years.

Thanks
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 12:51:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Alan Walpool wrote:
>
> >>>>> "Barry" == Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:
>
> Barry> I'd recommend removing the battery, and consider getting an
> Barry> inexpensive UPS. While this sounds convoluted, the battery may
> Barry> well cost over $200, and experience suggests that you may ruin
> Barry> it relatively quickly (1 to 2 years) leaving it in all the
> Barry> time, while you can get a quality (APC) UPS, 350 VA or
> Barry> similar, for $30 or less on sale (sometimes even "free after
> Barry> rebate").
>
> Why the ups? Just to protect the laptop. So if the battery is removed
> it will last longer? I have been trying to find an answer to this
> question for years.

Heat is your battery's enemy.

Notan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 12:54:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

So the recommendations are:

1) Unplug laptop when not in use.
2) When connected to AC power remove the battery.

Do I have it right now.

One last question.

How often should the battery be charged completely when it is removed
from the laptop?

Trying to find a solution to keep those batteries running because a
laptop battery is expensive.

Later,

Alan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 1:31:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Yea, I meant remove the battery.. lol

I drain my batteries down to about 60%, then leave them in my bag until
I need them.

sess
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 5:21:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

As I posted, a better solution is to remove that battery and plug the
laptop into a low-end UPS (you can get APC 350VA UPS' for under $30 on
sale, sometimes even "free after rebate").


Sess wrote:
> Unplug it! I have a 2 year old Sony Vaio FXA49, and the battery is shot
> from just sitting around plugged in.
>
> And sony's batterys arn't cheap. (well is anything they make cheap???
> lol) Sony Direct will set you back a good 200 bucks.
>
> Sess
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 7:15:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Alan Walpool wrote:
> So the recommendations are:
>
> 1) Unplug laptop when not in use.
> 2) When connected to AC power remove the battery.
>
> Do I have it right now.
>
> One last question.
>
> How often should the battery be charged completely when it is removed
> from the laptop?
>
> Trying to find a solution to keep those batteries running because a
> laptop battery is expensive.
>
> Later,
>
> Alan
>
If you adopt that strategy, correct 2) to read "remove battery before
connecting to AC". Do not remove it (nor install it) WHILE connected to AC.

--
John Doue
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 7:51:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You don't need the UPS any more for a laptop than you do for any other
computer, but I take the view that ALL computers need to be on a UPS,
just as I take the view that ALL computers with a broadband internet
connection need to be behind a router, even if the internet connection
is not shared.

The reason is that if there is a power failure while the computer is on,
you don't want to take the risk of losing all open work, or, more
rarely, everything on the entire hard drive.


Alan Walpool wrote:

>>>>>>"Barry" == Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:
>
>
> Barry> I'd recommend removing the battery, and consider getting an
> Barry> inexpensive UPS. While this sounds convoluted, the battery may
> Barry> well cost over $200, and experience suggests that you may ruin
> Barry> it relatively quickly (1 to 2 years) leaving it in all the
> Barry> time, while you can get a quality (APC) UPS, 350 VA or
> Barry> similar, for $30 or less on sale (sometimes even "free after
> Barry> rebate").
>
> Why the ups? Just to protect the laptop. So if the battery is removed
> it will last longer? I have been trying to find an answer to this
> question for years.
>
> Thanks
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 21, 2005 7:54:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No; if the battery is removed, there is then no reason to unplug it.
But I'd add "plug it into a UPS" as 3)

The most common recommendation from battery makers for LiIon batteries
is to store them with a partial charge (40% to 70%). But my own
experience is to "cycle" them about every 90 days (and, in fact, I
usually store them fully charged). Don't take them down below about 20%
when cycling them.



Alan Walpool wrote:

> So the recommendations are:
>
> 1) Unplug laptop when not in use.
> 2) When connected to AC power remove the battery.
>
> Do I have it right now.
>
> One last question.
>
> How often should the battery be charged completely when it is removed
> from the laptop?
>
> Trying to find a solution to keep those batteries running because a
> laptop battery is expensive.
>
> Later,
>
> Alan
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 22, 2005 1:03:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>>>>> "John" == John Doue <notwobe@yahoo.com> writes:

John> Alan Walpool wrote:
>> So the recommendations are: 1) Unplug laptop when not in use. 2)
>> When connected to AC power remove the battery. Do I have it right
>> now. One last question. How often should the battery be charged
>> completely when it is removed from the laptop? Trying to find a
>> solution to keep those batteries running because a laptop battery
>> is expensive. Later, Alan
>>
John> If you adopt that strategy, correct 2) to read "remove battery
John> before connecting to AC". Do not remove it (nor install it)
John> WHILE connected to AC.

Thanks I think I got it now.

Later

Alan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 22, 2005 1:08:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>>>>> "B" == Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:

B> No; if the battery is removed, there is then no reason to unplug
B> it. But I'd add "plug it into a UPS" as 3)

B> The most common recommendation from battery makers for LiIon
B> batteries is to store them with a partial charge (40% to 70%). But
B> my own experience is to "cycle" them about every 90 days (and, in
B> fact, I usually store them fully charged). Don't take them down
B> below about 20% when cycling them.



B> Alan Walpool wrote:

>> So the recommendations are: 1) Unplug laptop when not in use. 2)
>> When connected to AC power remove the battery. Do I have it right
>> now. One last question. How often should the battery be charged
>> completely when it is removed from the laptop? Trying to find a
>> solution to keep those batteries running because a laptop battery
>> is expensive. Later, Alan
>>

Second revision based on responses.

1) When using AC power remove the battery before first, and use a UPS
to protect data and notebook.
2) Store battery with at least 50% charge or more.
3) Avoiding storing battery in a hot location (like a car in the
summer).
4) Cycle battery about every 90 days and avoid discharging batteries
below 20%.

Any corrections or additional suggestions?

Thanks,

Alan
!