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Power not turning on yet power to board

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December 6, 2011 2:42:22 PM

So Yesterday I received all of my parts in the mail (every part).
I tried to put them all together following video tutorials and all the manuals.
The power is on and the LED lights on the motherboard are on except the CPU LED.
Nothing happens when I hit the power button on the front of the machine or on the power button on the motherboard.
I tried taking everything back out and installing it all again and still the same problem.
The I5 2500K doesn't really have any pins to speak of and more of the "pads" which they all look prefect still and same with the mobo pins.
Nothing shows up on screen, no fans turn on, and no beeps from the mobo.
Thanks to everyone who can help!

Here is my setup:
Case- Rosewill RANGER Gaming ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Cooler- COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus RR-B10-212P-G1 "Heatpipe Direct Contact"
Video Card- EVGA SuperClocked 01G-P3-1461-KR GeForce GTX 560 (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5
RAM- CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Low Profile
Hard drive- HITACHI Deskstar 7K1000.D HDS721075DLE630 (0F13179) 750GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
CPU- Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core
Mother Board- ASUS P8Z68-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
PSU- CORSAIR Enthusiast Series CMPSU-850TX 850W ATX12V v2.2 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS
Disk Drive- ASUS Black 12X BD-ROM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-ROM SATA Internal Blu-ray Drive
















a c 121 V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 2:49:45 PM

Please take a picture of the motherboard as you have it right now. It would be a lot easier for us to see any potential problems that could be causing that than it would be for you to try to explain every detail.

After you take the picture upload it here :) 
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December 6, 2011 3:04:14 PM

Picture would help.... but make sure your Front I/O Panel connections to the motherboard are properly installed.... some can be a little tricky.
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a b V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 3:46:55 PM

If you have a switch on the back of the PSU, make sure it is switched so that power can flow through the PSU.

Also, double check that the processor power is plugged in solidly. It should either be a 4 pin or 8 pin connector and located very close to the processor itself.
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December 6, 2011 5:22:05 PM

itzdanielp said:
Please take a picture of the motherboard as you have it right now. It would be a lot easier for us to see any potential problems that could be causing that than it would be for you to try to explain every detail.

After you take the picture upload it here :) 



Sorry for the mess in the pictures. I have been moving cables and unplugging things all morning.
Thanks everybody!
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a c 121 V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 5:31:11 PM

Just to verify...

Every time you remove the heatsink off of the processor you are re-applying the thermal interface material? (Kind of sticky gray stuff) If you do not reapply this, the CPU will overheat instantly and shut down to prevent damage.

Next step is to remove everything that is not essential to startup. so, remove all the USB headers, the front panel audio connectors.....

basically just a single stick of RAM, no GPU (Z68 has a built in one), a HDD and all the power. Try turning on, see what happens.
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a b V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 6:00:19 PM

Are those the slots your motherboard suggests you put RAM in?

It shouldn't keep any/all power from flowing through to the board, but neither should a short circuit either.

The only thing that should stop any/all power from getting to the board should be incorrect cabling or a PSU problem.

Do you have another computer you could stick your new Corsair PSU in to verify that it works fine?
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December 6, 2011 6:20:40 PM

Unfortunately I do not have another computer I could test it out on.
I have the RAM setup exactly how the motherboard manual shows it.
I just removed everything down to bare bones (one ram, no gpu, no extra wiring) and it still did the same thing.
PSU on and power light and reset light on. But nothing actually comes on. No fans. No beeps.
I do put a little more thermal compound (arctic silver 5) on every time I remove the cooler.
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a b V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 6:33:35 PM

Can you take it to work and tell an IT guy to put it in a computer and try to turn it on?

- Edit - How about a voltometer, do you have one of those? They are like $10.
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a c 121 V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 7:25:28 PM

amoz1983 said:
Unfortunately I do not have another computer I could test it out on.
I have the RAM setup exactly how the motherboard manual shows it.
I just removed everything down to bare bones (one ram, no gpu, no extra wiring) and it still did the same thing.
PSU on and power light and reset light on. But nothing actually comes on. No fans. No beeps.
I do put a little more thermal compound (arctic silver 5) on every time I remove the cooler.



Go ahead and completely clean off the CPU and Heatsink with some paper towels and then some rubbing alcohol. Buildup from multiple applications can cause problems.

Once you completely clean the compound of, make sure the CPU is installed the correction direction. (line triangles up) reapply a *thin* layer of artic silver 5 across the whole chip and see if that helps.
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a b V Motherboard
December 6, 2011 7:40:00 PM

Everyone has their own way to apply thermal paste, but the one that is the most idiot proof is a single dot in the center of the CPU.

Fully applied it shouldn't be thin enough that you can read the cpu markings underneath it.

Ideally it should have a pretty good bit of thickness.

It is hard to get this exactly right, but if you read the following article, it should help you do it right.

The thermal paste should be section 6 or 8 or so of the guide, there is a hyperlink to it at the top of the article

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cooling-air-pressur...
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a c 156 V Motherboard
December 8, 2011 2:38:30 PM

There. Fixed the pictures.

A single blob of thermal compound is not the best way to go with cooler with exposed heat pipes.

Suggestions for applying thermal compound:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:

Check for line power at the PSU input. Extension cords, power strips, and power cords do fail.

If you have power and no beeps, suspect components in likely order are PSU, motherboard, and CPU.

Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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a b V Motherboard
December 13, 2011 5:08:51 AM

Hey OP,

I've got the same board, the same processor, and the same heatsink.... and you guessed it, the exact same problem. I've benched everything (as far as i reasonably can) and I'm currently not sure what the hell the problem is. Part of me things PSU, but normally their demise is quite noticeable and spectacular. So currently I'm suspecting the motherboard.

I'm going to buy some replacements today, and if I work out the issues, shall post back here.
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November 9, 2012 6:39:52 PM

I Have The Same Problem With my DH67BL intel MOBO...
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March 12, 2013 11:23:12 PM

Parkercraftlite said:
I Have The Same Problem With my DH67BL intel MOBO...


Just shutdown the computer last night and this morning the problem arrived, MB-intelDH67BL.

When connect power cable, MB little LED is on, but when press power button, nothing happen, I short the power pin but no result, i using tester and realized that there is current in two pins (which need to short for start power), I have a old PC and I checked there has current in only one pin.

I checked with another power supply but no result, I m unable to start my MB, may be there is some short-circulate.

ANY SOLUTION????
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a b V Motherboard
March 13, 2013 12:09:57 PM

I'm not an expert but you got a Fan(?) connected to a 4-pin connection but it is only a 3-pin connector. Remove (unplug) it, then try to boot up. It's the 5th pic down, behind the onboard audio port, it has USB something written near it.

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a b V Motherboard
March 14, 2013 12:57:10 AM

itzdanielp said:
Just to verify...

Every time you remove the heatsink off of the processor you are re-applying the thermal interface material? (Kind of sticky gray stuff) If you do not reapply this, the CPU will overheat instantly and shut down to prevent damage.

Probably not true. Thermal paste is only helps transfer heat. Most of the transfer is by direct contact.

Even no thermal paste may work but not well (it will overheat because of the heatsink surface being imperfect)

Old applications of paste will generally work well enough for testing.

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a b V Motherboard
March 14, 2013 6:46:24 AM

In the last pic, you got a molex double ended connector for what?

Is the extra power cable for motherboard connected to the board?

That heatsink is totally ridiculous, you can't use that. That heat sink is probably not even touching the cpu. It even looks like it's sitting on the capacitors.

This is a mini micro motherboard, much like the ones in Tom's Review -
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/mini-itx-z77-motherboard,...

As I stated previously, remove the rear fan connector from the motherboard, you can't jam a 3 pin connector on to a 4-pin connection, that connection is for a proper 12 v0.8a fan, you prtobably only got a 12v 0.65a rear fan

The Chassis Fan "CHA_FAN" connector (3-pin) is located next to the ram slots.
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