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I7 2600K & Quick Sync

I read in PC Magazine and on the website 3D Guru that the 2600K (P67 chipset) DOES have Quick Sync capability as long as a discrete GPU is not plugged in.
Yet you say in your article "The Intel core 990X Extreme Edition Processor Review" that "When you buy P67, you lose access to Quick Sync entirely".
The website 3D Guru even posted test results with a 2600K (P67)contrasting performance with a 2600K Quick Sync only versus a 2600K with an NVidia GTX 580 using its CUDA verus the 2600K and 580 GTX without CUDA.
Did you mean to say that "you lose Quick Sync entirely if you plug in a discrete graphics card"?
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  1. Best answer
    P67 chipset boards don't have the circuitry for using the integrated graphics, so they cannot use Quick Sync for now. You have to use an H67 board to enable the integrated graphics. There is some sort of software (from Virtu I think) that will be available that will enable the use of both Quick Sync and a discrete graphics card on the upcoming Z68 chipset.

    Notice the Mainboard tab of the CPU-Z screenshots in the Guru of 3D review (page 9, third pic down) -- they are using an Intel DH67BL mainboard (H67 chipset).
  2. Yup quick sync o h67, p67 no quick sync
  3. If there is no on board graphics or Quick Sync capability on the 2600K, then why does Intel say there is?

    http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=52214
  4. Intel agrees that the DH67BL is an H67 chipset board.

    BUT

    It is "fully compatible" (i.e., no add-in graphics card needed) with the 2600K!

    http://processormatch.intel.com/CompDB/SearchResult.aspx?BoardName=DH67BL&Lang=en-US

    http://processormatch.intel.com/CompDB/SearchResult.aspx?ProcNbr=I7-2600K&BoardName=DH67BL&Lang=en-US

    OK, I think I have found is the real answer:

    If you search for boards compatible with the 2600K, all the P67 boards require an add-in graphics card.

    BUT

    If you select one of the H67 boards compatible with the 2600K, you do NOT need an add-in graphics card

    http://processormatch.intel.com/CompDB/SearchResult.aspx?ProcNbr=I7-2600K&Lang=en-US

    But now I wonder if those H67 boards will allow the overclocking that is supposed to go with the 2600K??
  5. Leaps-from-Shadows said:
    P67 chipset boards don't have the circuitry for using the integrated graphics, so they cannot use Quick Sync for now. You have to use an H67 board to enable the integrated graphics. There is some sort of software (from Virtu I think) that will be available that will enable the use of both Quick Sync and a discrete graphics card on the upcoming Z68 chipset.

    Notice the Mainboard tab of the CPU-Z screenshots in the Guru of 3D review (page 9, third pic down) -- they are using an Intel DH67BL mainboard (H67 chipset).



    I think I am finally getting it. You were precisely right that a board with a P67 chipset will require an ann-in graphics card.

    However, the 2600K with its overclocking potential is compatible with several Intel H67 boards that therefore should support Quick Sync. I wonder if Tom's Hardware is trying to say that the 2600K can not be overclocked on an H67 board, although the Quick Sync would work?

    Also, Tom's Hardware seems to be tilted to gamers, and a gamer would want an add-in graphics card. THAT will disable Quick Sync on any card H67 or P67!

    To allow both the add-in card and Quick Sync with overclocking on a 2600K will need the Z68 chipset board and Virtu S/W.

    Am I correct about that?

    It is important to me because I do not want gaming, just high performance with a 2600K and its integrated graphics on an H67 card. That will save me about $1100 compared to getting an i7-970 and NVidia GTX 580 graphics.

    Sorry I was confused at first thinking that the P67 chipset was in the 2600K and not realizing that it is in the board.

    The article implied that if you got 2600K, you had to get P67! Not so per Intel.

    See my posts below with links to Intel for compatibility between 2600K and several P67 AND H67 boards.
  6. H67 allows you to use the integrated graphics and quick sync, but you cant overclock. P67 you cannot use integrated graphics so no quicksync, but you can overclock. The unreleased z68 allows both usage of the integrated grapchics(and quicksync) as well as overclocking.

    But on h67 you cant have a graphics card or itll disable the integrated graphics (so no quick sync).

    The i7 2600k is compatible with ALL p67 and h67 mobos. Is English your second language?


    There is no "partial" or "full" compatiblity, either its compatible or its not. Chipsets (motherboards) are sold with different features to be sold at different price points so consumers only buy what they need and not waste money. Although having a lot of chipsets confuses people not familiar with pc tech.
  7. k1114 said:
    H67 allows you to use the integrated graphics and quick sync, but you cant overclock. P67 you cannot use integrated graphics so no quicksync, but you can overclock. The unreleased z68 allows both usage of the integrated grapchics(and quicksync) as well as overclocking.

    But on h67 you cant have a graphics card or itll disable the integrated graphics (so no quick sync).

    The i7 2600k is compatible with ALL p67 and h67 mobos. Is English your second language?


    There is no "partial" or "full" compatiblity, either its compatible or its not. Chipsets (motherboards) are sold with different features to be sold at different price points so consumers only buy what they need and not waste money. Although having a lot of chipsets confuses people not familiar with pc tech.



    The Tom's Hardware review never said that the 2600K was compatible with both H67 and P67 cards. It implied, but never explained, that if you got 2600K, you would get P67, while 2600 went with H67. None of the articles (and I have read them all with English as my first language, French 2nd, German 3rd, Italian 4th, dutch 5th) ever said that the 2600K could be used with an H67 card or that the 2600 could be used with a P67 card.

    In fact, Intel, as I posted, and you agree that both chips are "fully compatible" (Intel's term indicated by the check mark in their compatibility table) with both cards. In some cases, (such as 2600K with DP67BG motherboard, an add-in graphic card is needed because the chipset is P67. Her is Intel's compatibility table:

    http://processormatch.intel.com/CompDB/SearchResult.aspx?ProcNbr=I7-2600K


    Although most buyers would never put a 2600K processor on an H67 card, I might for the following reasons: 1) I will want to overclock later, 2) I want the advantage of Quick Sync for video processing, 3) I do not plan to get a discrete GPU that would be needed for gaming but that would disable the onboard graphics in the 2600 or 2600K, 4) I plan to get the z68 board and Virtu software when that comes out, 5) swap out my old board and have overclocking, Quick Sync AND a discrete GPU for gaming.
  8. You are confused as to what P67 and H67 refer to. H67 is a motherboard not a card, P67 is a motherboard not a card. And you do not get a motherboard when buying a cpu. Both H67 and P67 are socket 1155, the i7 2600k is socket 1155, same socket=compatible.
  9. k1114 said:
    You are confused as to what P67 and H67 refer to. H67 is a motherboard not a card, P67 is a motherboard not a card. And you do not get a motherboard when buying a cpu. Both H67 and P67 are socket 1155, the i7 2600k is socket 1155, same socket=compatible.



    Sorry for my sloppy terminology, especially when I was trying to make things clearer for others who might follow this thread.

    I do understand that the P67 and H67 chipsets are used to create the motherboards with the relatively new 1155 socket for Sandy Bridge cpu.

    When I said "card", I really meant motherboard. I corrected that terminology when I referred to the Z68 "board" at the end of my comments.

    I think the strategy I have outlined is still valid and a good one for my needs despite the poor choice of the word "card"
  10. Yes, your strategy should work just fine.
  11. Leaps-from-Shadows said:
    Yes, your strategy should work just fine.



    Thank you. You have a great web site. I am so glad I found it while I was researching my decision between i7 970 and 2600K.
  12. Best answer selected by slhead.
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