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Replacing the hard drive on my Dell 600m

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 27, 2005 12:37:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi,

I am going to have to replace the drive on my Dell 600m laptop soon. I
have never done this one laptop before without reinstalling everything, so
I wondered if someone here could let me know the best way to clone my old
drive on to the new one. I would rather not have to recreate my whole
system at this point and instead find a way to transfer everything from
the old one to the new one in bootable state.

Help would be greatly appreciated.

--
//ceed
February 27, 2005 7:36:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

ceed <ceed@abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijk.com> wrote:
: Hi,

: I am going to have to replace the drive on my Dell 600m laptop soon. I
: have never done this one laptop before without reinstalling everything, so
: I wondered if someone here could let me know the best way to clone my old
: drive on to the new one. I would rather not have to recreate my whole
: system at this point and instead find a way to transfer everything from
: the old one to the new one in bootable state.

Get a USB hard drive enclosure for a 2.5" hard drive. Then clone your
old drive to your new one and swap them out. Depending on your
system, the new drive may simply boot immediately or it may require
some driver updates in Windows, but it should work. I've done it with
a desktop in Win98, never a WinXP laptop.

If you want good commercial software, instead of Ghost I recommend
Acronis True Image (about $35 if you look) for cloning and imaging.
There are free versions of cloning software available. Sometimes your
new hard drive comes with software to clone. Search Google for
something called the Ultimate Boot CD - lots of free utilities for
working with hard drives, including those released by most of the
major HD manufacturers. It's best to start with the software released
by the manufacturer of your drive if you can. True Image and
commercial packages like it may be worth the time they save you in
doing this. Someone might post a good free alternative to True
Image...

You might get a 3.5" HD enclose instead of a 2.5". Then get an IDE
adaptor to plug your laptop 2.5" drive into it. What that does is
allow you to buy huge, cheap 3.5" desktop drives for the enclosure and
use them as backup/archive drives. That's where Acronis True Image is
helpful - you can make backup images of your whole hard drive instead
of just clones.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 27, 2005 7:36:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 10:36:41 -0600, <usenetMYSHOES@bizaveMYSHOES.com>
wrote:

> Get a USB hard drive enclosure for a 2.5" hard drive. Then clone your
> old drive to your new one and swap them out. Depending on your
> system, the new drive may simply boot immediately or it may require
> some driver updates in Windows, but it should work. I've done it with
> a desktop in Win98, never a WinXP laptop.
> If you want good commercial software, instead of Ghost I recommend
> Acronis True Image (about $35 if you look) for cloning and imaging.
> There are free versions of cloning software available. Sometimes your
> new hard drive comes with software to clone. Search Google for
> something called the Ultimate Boot CD - lots of free utilities for
> working with hard drives, including those released by most of the
> major HD manufacturers. It's best to start with the software released
> by the manufacturer of your drive if you can. True Image and
> commercial packages like it may be worth the time they save you in
> doing this. Someone might post a good free alternative to True
> Image...
> You might get a 3.5" HD enclose instead of a 2.5". Then get an IDE
> adaptor to plug your laptop 2.5" drive into it. What that does is
> allow you to buy huge, cheap 3.5" desktop drives for the enclosure and
> use them as backup/archive drives. That's where Acronis True Image is
> helpful - you can make backup images of your whole hard drive instead
> of just clones.
> Andrew
> --
> ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----

Thank you, Andrew! What a great helpful response! Usenet is still the
best.. :) 


--
//ceed
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 27, 2005 9:21:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

....> Get a USB hard drive enclosure for a 2.5" hard drive. Then clone your
> old drive to your new one and swap them out. Depending on your
> system, the new drive may simply boot immediately or it may require
> some driver updates in Windows, but it should work. I've done it with
> a desktop in Win98, never a WinXP laptop.
>
>....

If you want to do this with one purchase, get your enclosure from a company
called E-Z Gig. They will supply the software to do the cloning. I have
used this on a Dell 600m after trying unsuccessfully to clone the drive with
Ghost.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 27, 2005 9:30:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 16:22:41 -0600, wbw <wbwither@y-a-h-double-o.com>
wrote:

> Yeah, for some reason I assumed that the old drive was failing.
> I guess because of the "have to" part. I can't really think of
> many reasons why someone would "have to" have more capacity than
> what they already have.

The drive still works, but it is showing signs of "fatigue". It's getting
these cliking sounds I have heard from other laptop drives before they go
bye-bye. Some utilities that monitors the S.M.A.R.T stuff reports it's
time to think of new one. I use my laptop *a lot*, so doing this now will
prevent me from the nightmare I had last time when it happened at the most
inconvenient time (while traveling of course on my wayt to give an
important presentation).

--
//ceed
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 27, 2005 9:40:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 12:21:38 -0600, Joe Davis <davisexp@attglobal.net>
wrote:

> If you want to do this with one purchase, get your enclosure from a
> company
> called E-Z Gig. They will supply the software to do the cloning. I have
> used this on a Dell 600m after trying unsuccessfully to clone the drive
> with
> Ghost.

Just ordered a 60GB drive and the back-up thingy from EZ-Gig. Seems to be
just what the doctor ordered. Thank you, and everyone else advicing me on
this! :) 



--
//ceed
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 27, 2005 9:50:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Another option would be to buy two of the 3.5" to 2.5" IDE
adapters and put both drives into a desktop machine. (Unplug
the desktop's hard drive(s) temporarily.) Saves the expense
of the USB enclosure (although they're nice to have... but to
get any further use out of it besides just using it to copy
your drive, you'll have to buy another hard drive to put
into it). The adapters should cost like $10 apiece or less.
Whatever disk-copy software you use would be the same as with
the USB option.
February 27, 2005 11:15:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Joe Davis <davisexp@attglobal.net> wrote:
: ...> Get a USB hard drive enclosure for a 2.5" hard drive. Then clone your
: > old drive to your new one and swap them out. Depending on your
: > system, the new drive may simply boot immediately or it may require
: > some driver updates in Windows, but it should work. I've done it with
: > a desktop in Win98, never a WinXP laptop.

: If you want to do this with one purchase, get your enclosure from a company
: called E-Z Gig. They will supply the software to do the cloning. I have
: used this on a Dell 600m after trying unsuccessfully to clone the drive with
: Ghost.

Looks like I can get their kit (software + enclosure) for $66.95. I
can get a USB 2.5" enclosure for $32 and I paid about $35 for Acronis
True Image, so the kit wouldn't save me any money. I have no idea how
good the Ez-Gig II cloning/imaging software is, but I know that the
Acronis software is excellent and it seems to have a superior
reputation to Ghost. I'd venture to guess that True Image is better
than Ez-Gig's software.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
February 27, 2005 11:18:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

wbw <wbwither@y-a-h-double-o.com> wrote:
: Another option would be to buy two of the 3.5" to 2.5" IDE
: adapters and put both drives into a desktop machine. (Unplug
: the desktop's hard drive(s) temporarily.) Saves the expense
: of the USB enclosure (although they're nice to have... but to
: get any further use out of it besides just using it to copy
: your drive, you'll have to buy another hard drive to put
: into it).

That assumes your original hard drive is toast. I got the impression
that the OP was upgrading his/her hard drive for speed or capacity, so
the original would still be useful for some backup storage.

: The adapters should cost like $10 apiece or less.
: Whatever disk-copy software you use would be the same as with
: the USB option.

I think I'd still opt for the $32 enclosure vs two $10 adaptors. As
you say, the enclosures are handy to have around.


Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 28, 2005 1:22:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Andrew <usenetMYSHOES@bizavemyshoes.com> wrote:
> That assumes your original hard drive is toast. I got the impression
> that the OP was upgrading his/her hard drive for speed or capacity, so
> the original would still be useful for some backup storage.

Yeah, for some reason I assumed that the old drive was failing.
I guess because of the "have to" part. I can't really think of
many reasons why someone would "have to" have more capacity than
what they already have. Particularly on a laptop, where I think
we can safely assume this guy isn't spending his days rendering
gigs of 3D animations or something. More room is always nice, but
rarely necessitated, given the options of CD/DVD backup, external
hard drives (or an iPod), remote/networked storage for rarely-used
files....
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 28, 2005 2:33:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No matter what you do, there is a chance that you will have to do a
repair install. XP "knows" what hard drive it was installed on (at the
drive serial number level), and it often won't run after being "moved"
to a new drive. A repair install, however, can retain your installed
software and settings.


wbw wrote:

> Another option would be to buy two of the 3.5" to 2.5" IDE
> adapters and put both drives into a desktop machine. (Unplug
> the desktop's hard drive(s) temporarily.) Saves the expense
> of the USB enclosure (although they're nice to have... but to
> get any further use out of it besides just using it to copy
> your drive, you'll have to buy another hard drive to put
> into it). The adapters should cost like $10 apiece or less.
> Whatever disk-copy software you use would be the same as with
> the USB option.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 28, 2005 1:03:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

If I clone a drive and it won't boot, do you think a repair installation
would fix it?

Lisa

Barry Watzman wrote:
>
> No matter what you do, there is a chance that you will have to do a
> repair install. XP "knows" what hard drive it was installed on (at the
> drive serial number level), and it often won't run after being "moved"
> to a new drive. A repair install, however, can retain your installed
> software and settings.
>
> wbw wrote:
>
> > Another option would be to buy two of the 3.5" to 2.5" IDE
> > adapters and put both drives into a desktop machine. (Unplug
> > the desktop's hard drive(s) temporarily.) Saves the expense
> > of the USB enclosure (although they're nice to have... but to
> > get any further use out of it besides just using it to copy
> > your drive, you'll have to buy another hard drive to put
> > into it). The adapters should cost like $10 apiece or less.
> > Whatever disk-copy software you use would be the same as with
> > the USB option.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 1, 2005 2:34:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Do you think the E-Z Gig software has some way to get around this problem?
I cloned a drive using Ghost and it didn't work, but then using the same
drive and enclosure, used the E-Z Gig software and it worked fine.


"Lisa Horton" <Lisa0205@lisahorton.net> wrote in message
news:42235CDE.D594927D@lisahorton.net...
> If I clone a drive and it won't boot, do you think a repair installation
> would fix it?
>
> Lisa
>
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> No matter what you do, there is a chance that you will have to do a
>> repair install. XP "knows" what hard drive it was installed on (at the
>> drive serial number level), and it often won't run after being "moved"
>> to a new drive. A repair install, however, can retain your installed
>> software and settings.
>>
>> wbw wrote
March 1, 2005 2:49:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Joe Davis <davisexp@attglobal.net> wrote:
: Do you think the E-Z Gig software has some way to get around this problem?
: I cloned a drive using Ghost and it didn't work, but then using the same
: drive and enclosure, used the E-Z Gig software and it worked fine.

Could be - or it could be Ghost just screwed it up. Depends which
version of Ghost you were using, too. I have never cloned a WinXP
hard drive, but I have heard that Acronis True Image works very well
and is superior to Ghost (cheaper, too).

Andrew

: "Lisa Horton" <Lisa0205@lisahorton.net> wrote in message
: news:42235CDE.D594927D@lisahorton.net...
: > If I clone a drive and it won't boot, do you think a repair installation
: > would fix it?
: >
: > Lisa
: >
: > Barry Watzman wrote:
: >>
: >> No matter what you do, there is a chance that you will have to do a
: >> repair install. XP "knows" what hard drive it was installed on (at the
: >> drive serial number level), and it often won't run after being "moved"
: >> to a new drive. A repair install, however, can retain your installed
: >> software and settings.
: >>
: >> wbw wrote






--

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
!