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Intel 10-core Xeon processors

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a b à CPUs
April 5, 2011 1:54:27 PM

They are actually server processors if I'm not mistaken. Also, all those threads will actually degrade gaming performance when compared to say a 4-core CPU, as VERY few applications can use all those threads.

In short, it's overkill and a waste of money to buy them for gaming.

PS: You'd also need a server motherboard, I think it's LGA771 or something, limiting graphics possibilities and rendering all that processing power even more useless...

:) 
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April 5, 2011 2:27:06 PM

those would be sweet in F@H ;) 
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a b à CPUs
April 7, 2011 12:48:49 PM

LOL - well I was predicting a 10-core CPU over a year ago :D . I should get a Tom's Hammer for being right!! :p 
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a c 99 à CPUs
April 9, 2011 10:02:13 PM

Toxxyc said:
They are actually server processors if I'm not mistaken. Also, all those threads will actually degrade gaming performance when compared to say a 4-core CPU, as VERY few applications can use all those threads.


Those are server CPUs. The reason these CPUs will be very mediocre for gaming is that the clock speeds are much lower than quad-core desktop CPUs, not because they have more cores. A quad-core CPU running at 2.0 GHz would perform like a 10-core CPU running at 2.0 GHz; the game would just ignore the extra cores. These kinds of server CPUs have TDPs similar to that of higher-end desktop CPUs but clock speeds are much lower due to that TDP budget being spread among a much larger number of cores than in a quad-core desktop CPU. Theoretically you could have very aggressive Turbo Boost bins for lightly-loaded operation that would result in similar performance as a desktop CPU (given a similar TDP and manufacturing process). However, people who pay $4000+ for 10-core CPUs that can be run in up to 8-CPU servers intend to run programs that use a LOT of cores and an aggressive Turbo Boost setup for poorly-threaded tasks would not be useful for its intended audience.

Quote:
In short, it's overkill and a waste of money to buy them for gaming.


Agreed.

Quote:
PS: You'd also need a server motherboard, I think it's LGA771 or something, limiting graphics possibilities and rendering all that processing power even more useless...

:) 


The socket these CPUs needs is LGA1567. LGA771 was the socket Intel used for dual-CPU Xeons based on the Pentium D Presler and Core 2s. The only LGA1567 motherboard I can find that is sold individually and not only as part of a premade server is Supermicro's X8QB6. It isn't particularly limited in graphics capabilities as it can run two PCIe v2.0 x16 GPUs at the same time. I'm guessing CrossFire probably works as it is an Intel chipset. The problems with that board are that it costs about $2200, its 16.4" by 16.8" size, and its enormous power consumption. The board pretty much only fits in one case that Supermicro sells (no price listed, I bet it's not cheap) and they endow that case with two 1400-watt PSUs.
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