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What is the highest processor to be on pentium III motherboard?

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April 6, 2011 8:57:58 AM

Hello,what is the highest size of processor that can be of pentium III motherboard?
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April 6, 2011 9:07:41 AM

From memory it is the P3 1.1 GHZ but they were rare. 1 GHZ was the more common top end P3.
April 6, 2011 9:38:18 AM

Just to throw this out there, it might be cheaper to upgrade. I wasn't really into intel at that time, but it might be like the amd socket 939 cpu's (specially the dual cores) where they can be more expensive then something a whole lot better at the same price or cheaper.
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April 6, 2011 9:51:04 AM

mac4desmond said:
Hello,what is the highest size of processor that can be of pentium III motherboard?
Pentium III 1.40 GHz, using the Tualatin core. It was also available with reduced cache, a higher multiplier and lower FSB as the 1.40 GHz Tualatin Celeron.
April 6, 2011 10:45:34 AM

It depends on the chipset and if it is a slot 1 or socket 370.
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April 6, 2011 12:49:12 PM

Ancient_1 said:
It depends on the chipset and if it is a slot 1 or socket 370.


Agreed.

You could get a motherboard, ram and cpu that's 10x as fast for about $140.
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April 6, 2011 7:42:17 PM

Ancient_1 said:
It depends on the chipset and if it is a slot 1 or socket 370.
No, it really depends on how much you want to soak into the machine.

I ran my Tualatins on a P3B-F. That's a Slot 1 board.

1.) If the board's voltage regulator was designed for Coppermine processors, you only needed an simple adapter. Simple adapters were made for both Slot 1 and Socket 370.
2.) If the board's voltage regulator did not support Coppermine, you needed an adapter with its own voltage regulator such as PowerLeap's, which were available for both Slot 1 and Socket 370 motherboards.
3.) If your chipset was limited to 66 MHz, you would run at a slower speed.
4.) If your motherboard supported 133 MHz, even by overclocking (such as Asus and Abit BX boards), you could run Tualatin PIII at full speed. If your board ran 100 MHz max, you could run Tualatin Celeron at full speed.
5.) Intel saw these adapters as a sales issue and added a BIOS exclusion. If you encountered a BIOS exclusion, you had to track down and FORCE flash the older BIOS.
6.) If you had one of the last few Socket 370 boards, no adapter was required.
7.) If you couldn't find a simple adapter, you could accomplish the same thing with a piece of wire.
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April 7, 2011 1:18:19 AM

Crashman said:
No, it really depends on how much you want to soak into the machine.

I ran my Tualatins on a P3B-F. That's a Slot 1 board.

1.) If the board's voltage regulator was designed for Coppermine processors, you only needed an simple adapter. Simple adapters were made for both Slot 1 and Socket 370.
2.) If the board's voltage regulator did not support Coppermine, you needed an adapter with its own voltage regulator such as PowerLeap's, which were available for both Slot 1 and Socket 370 motherboards.
3.) If your chipset was limited to 66 MHz, you would run at a slower speed.
4.) If your motherboard supported 133 MHz, even by overclocking (such as Asus and Abit BX boards), you could run Tualatin PIII at full speed. If your board ran 100 MHz max, you could run Tualatin Celeron at full speed.
5.) Intel saw these adapters as a sales issue and added a BIOS exclusion. If you encountered a BIOS exclusion, you had to track down and FORCE flash the older BIOS.
6.) If you had one of the last few Socket 370 boards, no adapter was required.
7.) If you couldn't find a simple adapter, you could accomplish the same thing with a piece of wire.


You know you're getting old when all those points are things you remembr as being "common sense". I remember those days vividly.
!