Macro --what happens in camera?

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have a few digicams--Nikon,Canon all with their macro mode. I could
not figure out what this mode does to the camera. I cannot hear any
lens being moved inside to change the focusing ability.

A search on Google discovered no answer but only a few similar
questions.

anyone,please?

ABC
Do not reply by email. Replay to NG
8 answers Last reply
More about macro what camera
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    To focus closely (what is referred to as macro mode) The lens system moves
    out away from the sensor. On compact cameras, this may be slight and not
    very apparent.

    If you ever get your hands on a film or digital SLR, focus the lens on
    something close. You should note how the lens extends more from the main
    barrel (unless it is internal focusing type which could also be the case on
    some digital compacts.)

    John


    "ABC" <ABC@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:p7dgv092j1oobitogvgfhh7v1415ih46oh@4ax.com...
    >I have a few digicams--Nikon,Canon all with their macro mode. I could
    > not figure out what this mode does to the camera. I cannot hear any
    > lens being moved inside to change the focusing ability.
    >
    > A search on Google discovered no answer but only a few similar
    > questions.
    >
    > anyone,please?
    >
    > ABC
    > Do not reply by email. Replay to NG
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Optics is an unforgiving science. It turns out that for any (typical)
    optical system, one can only optimize for one particular
    camera-to-object relationship. Given an object distance, the lens
    lements can be subtly bent to optimize spherical aberations, comatic
    aberations, astigmetic aberations, field flatness, distortion, and last
    but not least Chromatic aberations. Once bent, the lens as a whole has
    been optimized for this lens-to-object relationship, and the lens will
    be less sharp anywhere else. Notice that the changes are occuring to
    the glass elements themselves, to to their spacing.

    A 'regular' camera lens is optimized for a focus point close to
    infinity. Optimized means that the aberations are made as well as the
    lens designer can do for that focal length (almost infinity).

    A 'macro' lens is optimized for lens to object distances close to the
    focal length of the lens, adjusting the shapes of the lens surfaces to
    optimize this different goal--sharp focus at very small distances.

    When a regular lens is used at very close focal distances (as a
    'macro'), the shperical aberation can become unusefully larger than the
    'regular' case. With a small sacrifice to coma and astigmatism, an
    interior lens (or lens group) can be moved a small amount to optimize
    the lens for a focal distance only a few focal lengths away from the
    front element of the lens itself. Done thusly, the combination lens is
    passable as a macro.
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    MitchAlsup@aol.com wrote:
    > Optics is an unforgiving science. It turns out that for any (typical)
    > optical system, one can only optimize for one particular
    > camera-to-object relationship. Given an object distance, the lens
    > lements can be subtly bent to optimize spherical aberations, comatic
    > aberations, astigmetic aberations, field flatness, distortion, and
    > last but not least Chromatic aberations. Once bent, the lens as a
    > whole has been optimized for this lens-to-object relationship, and
    > the lens will be less sharp anywhere else. Notice that the changes
    > are occuring to the glass elements themselves, to to their spacing.
    >
    > A 'regular' camera lens is optimized for a focus point close to
    > infinity. Optimized means that the aberations are made as well as the
    > lens designer can do for that focal length (almost infinity).
    >
    > A 'macro' lens is optimized for lens to object distances close to the
    > focal length of the lens, adjusting the shapes of the lens surfaces to
    > optimize this different goal--sharp focus at very small distances.
    >
    > When a regular lens is used at very close focal distances (as a
    > 'macro'), the shperical aberation can become unusefully larger than
    > the 'regular' case. With a small sacrifice to coma and astigmatism, an
    > interior lens (or lens group) can be moved a small amount to optimize
    > the lens for a focal distance only a few focal lengths away from the
    > front element of the lens itself. Done thusly, the combination lens is
    > passable as a macro.

    Thank you.


    --
    Frank ess

    PS: I'll appreciate it when you leave enough of the post you are
    responding to so I can understand your motives and references.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "JohnR66" <nospam@att.net> wrote in
    news:SyYJd.95455$w62.8952@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:

    > To focus closely (what is referred to as macro mode) The lens system
    > moves out away from the sensor. On compact cameras, this may be slight
    > and not very apparent.

    On my Canon G2 nothing happens.

    It is my guess that the macro setting is just a software thing.
    It makes it more easy for the camera to focus by limiting the
    search to two different areas. Or - it might (ouch!) be just
    a marketing ploy. A camera must have a macro mode - otherwise it
    is not possible to sell.


    /Roland
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 27 Jan 2005 20:36:51 GMT, Roland Karlsson
    <roland_dot_karlsson@bonetmail.com> wrote:

    >"JohnR66" <nospam@att.net> wrote in
    >news:SyYJd.95455$w62.8952@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:
    >
    >> To focus closely (what is referred to as macro mode) The lens system
    >> moves out away from the sensor. On compact cameras, this may be slight
    >> and not very apparent.
    >
    >On my Canon G2 nothing happens.
    >
    >It is my guess that the macro setting is just a software thing.
    >It makes it more easy for the camera to focus by limiting the
    >search to two different areas. Or - it might (ouch!) be just
    >a marketing ploy. A camera must have a macro mode - otherwise it
    >is not possible to sell.

    on the G6 the lens systems moves and the cam refocusses when switching
    to macro .. so what is the take on that ? same on supermacro ..
    curious to read .. (similar thread on dpreview almost ad infinitum ..
    :-))
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Roland Karlsson <roland_dot_karlsson@bonetmail.com> writes:

    >On my Canon G2 nothing happens.

    You mean nothing happens when you press the button to engage macro mode.
    But the camera now searches a larger range of distances to look for
    correct focus. Now it will focus on closer things - but it takes longer
    to fail to focus if it's going to.

    >It is my guess that the macro setting is just a software thing.
    >It makes it more easy for the camera to focus by limiting the
    >search to two different areas.

    That's right. Or it might still be able to focus at infinity in macro
    mode; I don't remember. In other words, it either shifts the focus
    range, or just extends it.

    >Or - it might (ouch!) be just
    >a marketing ploy.

    No, there's a real difference in the distance range that the focus will
    lock.

    Dave
  7. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> writes:

    >PS: I'll appreciate it when you leave enough of the post you are
    >responding to so I can understand your motives and references.

    That might be nice, but that's also what threaded newsreaders provide.
    It's usually a single keystroke or mouse click to read the preceding
    article that any given article is a reply to.

    If your newsreader doesn't provide threading at all, you really should
    look for something better. You're missing an important tool without
    it.

    Dave
  8. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Dave Martindale wrote:
    > "Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> writes:
    >
    >> PS: I'll appreciate it when you leave enough of the post you are
    >> responding to so I can understand your motives and references.
    >
    > That might be nice, but that's also what threaded newsreaders provide.
    > It's usually a single keystroke or mouse click to read the preceding
    > article that any given article is a reply to.
    >
    > If your newsreader doesn't provide threading at all, you really should
    > look for something better. You're missing an important tool without
    > it.
    >

    You are so generous with your advice.

    --
    Frank ess
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