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80PLUS PSU allowing NVIDIA GeForce 9800 to get too hot!

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April 8, 2011 9:54:03 PM

Hi,

I just got one of Antec's 80PLUS PSUs out of the box and installed it, and I went straight back to gaming as my 250W power supply had failed. First thing I noticed- even though this is a 650W PSU and nothing of the sort should happen (except for Antec saying the 80PLUS models raised and lowered output according to the computer's needs,) the GPU temp quickly shot up to 70 deg Celsius, as it had done with my POS 250W!!! Does anyone know how to force the PSU to provide more wattage to the computer? Is there a 'cool and quiet' option anywhere that I can disable, that might fix this? Thanks.
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SPECS:
OS Version: Microsoft® Windows Vista™ Home Premium , Service Pack 2, 64 bit
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q8300 @ 2.50GHz, Intel64 Family 6 Model 23 Stepping 10
Processor Count: 4
RAM: 4029 Mb
Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GT , 512 Mb
Hard Drives: C: Total - 466967 MB, Free - 331592 MB; D: Total - 466904 MB, Free - 456860 MB;
Motherboard: Acer, EG45M, ,
Antivirus: ESET Smart Security 4.0, Updated and Enabled
a b ) Power supply
April 8, 2011 10:01:25 PM

It doesn't work that way. More wattage doesn't mean lower temps. In fact it would usually result in hotter temps. Usually if your system is underpowered (yours was) it will not be stable. Having a power supply that is rated for higher wattage gives you the correct volts/amps/watts where they need to be when you have more hardware in your PC. The concept with underpowered PSUs is that the output in watts is the same, but at a dire cost to the materials in the underpowered PSU. They burn up, explode, smoke, or just stop altogether when pushed too hard too long. When I say the watts are the same, I mean the PC and its part are asking for 400 watts, the PSU gives it to them even if it is a 250 watt PSU, except the "correctness" of the power would be compromised.
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April 8, 2011 10:10:14 PM

Thanks for telling me, but based on your suggestion, if higher wattage does not equal lower temps, then how in the world can I get the GPU temperature down?
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April 8, 2011 10:11:29 PM

Dude, nothing to do with your PSU, although it's good you changed it. Clean out your rig, open the GPU and clean its heatsink. If it's overclocked, make sure you're not pushing it too far and overvolting. Just make sure everything's clean first. I clean my graphics cards every 4-5 months. The temps drop by 10C every time.
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April 8, 2011 10:15:16 PM

I have to say I have read some pretty incredible things here and this one is near the top.

I am perplexed at what you thought you are trying to fix. The temp of your GPU?

But it does have a cool and quiet option... Puch the button the front of your computer and it will go into low power mode and be very quiet. Of course the display will go dayk to support this quiet mode.....
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a b ) Power supply
April 8, 2011 10:18:26 PM

70 degrees c is well within tolerance for the 9800gt
i think you can turn up the fan in 1 of the nvidia panels or ntune. not absolutely sure as i have an ati card, which does allow fan control.
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April 8, 2011 10:20:55 PM

Jay_83 said:
Dude, nothing to do with your PSU, although it's good you changed it. Clean out your rig, open the GPU and clean its heatsink. If it's overclocked, make sure you're not pushing it too far and overvolting. Just make sure everything's clean first. I clean my graphics cards every 4-5 months. The temps drop by 10C every time.



Cleaned it, same results...

And I'm trying to fix the temps because I don't want the GPU to overheat. This is the family computer (sigh..) Even if it will make my temps HIGHER, is there a cool and quiet or "energy saving" (and the like) mode in the BIOS, for the PSU, that I can turn off? (And no, it's not sleep mode hahaha)
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April 8, 2011 10:22:15 PM

HEXiT said:
70 degrees c is well within tolerance for the 9800gt
i think you can turn up the fan in 1 of the nvidia panels or ntune. not absolutely sure as i have an ati card, which does allow fan control.


And what I'm actually (more) concerned about is the fan breaking... yes, the fan breaking. Again, family computer... the GPU's automatic fan gets up to 70% according to AIDA, but it sounds like full speed.
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a b ) Power supply
April 8, 2011 10:40:31 PM

the fan will be designed to do a minimum of 30,000 hours (average use of 6 years) at 100 percent, and will give lots of warning b4 it breaks...
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April 8, 2011 10:55:56 PM

HEXiT said:
the fan will be designed to do a minimum of 30,000 hours (average use of 6 years) at 100 percent, and will give lots of warning b4 it breaks...



Thanks... nothing to worry about I guess.
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a c 79 ) Power supply
April 8, 2011 11:21:56 PM

Lets clear it up best i can.

Power supplies only supply what is needed. That said 80+ just means the power supply generates less heat since less power is wasted when turning the 120/240 volts AC from your house to 12,5 and 3.3 volts DC for the computer.

Do not worry about 70c it is well within the cards specs. That card will not even start to slow down(clock down to lower temps, and this happens well after full fan speed is reached) to save it self until past 105c.
http://www.nvidia.com/object/product_geforce_9800gt_us....

Your old 250watt psu may well have actually cooled the system better since it had lower efficiency and thereby had a faster fan to cool it self. A direct result is a cooler system. A good exhaust fan will keep your case and components cool.

The 9800GT has no cool,n,quiet as that is an AMD cpu option(your Intel cpu has speedstep) and at that time, video cards did not yet have such a feature(they do now:)  ).

Hope this clears things up a bit.
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April 8, 2011 11:45:39 PM

Thanks. Then if the card is generally fine until 105C, how can I force the fan to run more slowly so that it doesn't sound like a tornado siren? Also could rivatuner help with that?
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a c 79 ) Power supply
April 9, 2011 2:35:41 AM

While it can take up to 105, cooler is still better. The single slot cooler on that card is still working fairly hard to cool it as best as it can.

There was some 9800GT's with dual slot coolers, those ran cool and quiet.

I recommend just turning up the volume when gaming or just seeing if you can improve overall case airflow. The cooler the air the card gets, the quieter it will run, if you want to try to slow the fan down, keep an eye on the temps. try to keep it under 85 if you can. if for nothing else just to prolong the cards life.

I did run a X 1900XT at 118 for hours on end(fanless) due to a software issue that shut its fan off. After that I ran the fan right off the psu since it was aftermarket, at full speed it was silent.
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April 9, 2011 2:48:48 AM

Thanks. My games never push it above 85 anyway.

Now, the PSU (I know its the PSU) is making this hideously high kind of squeaking noise, that goes away whenever I completely shut off power to it (I/O switch.) I can't make it go away, any fix?
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April 9, 2011 3:34:27 AM

Are you running a continuous load on the graphics card? Some graphics cards have power regulators which feed allot of electrical noise back into the PSU - the regulators on the card switch on and off very quickly in the process of dropping 12 volts down to 2 or so, and more or less of this shows up in the output stages of the PSU. Some PSUs have parts which vibrate when exposed to this kind of noise, turning electrical noise into acoustic noise. This is probably what you are hearing, and it seems to happen most when the card is under heavy load. For example, my 9600 GT causes a bit of the kind of noise you are describing in my corsair power supply when I am running folding @ home.
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April 9, 2011 9:43:00 PM

Currently, no. The computer is completely shut off, and it's still squealing. But also, does 73 deg Celsius and an 85% 1slot fan usage pose anything significant?
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a b ) Power supply
April 9, 2011 11:13:59 PM

sushi064 said:
Thanks for telling me, but based on your suggestion, if higher wattage does not equal lower temps, then how in the world can I get the GPU temperature down?

If your in your house and get too hot hot you turn up the air con or turn on a fan dont you? not force more power into your electrical system.
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April 10, 2011 12:11:17 AM

iam2thecrowe said:
If your in your house and get too hot hot you turn up the air con or turn on a fan dont you? not force more power into your electrical system.


I know.. somehow I thought I could cool down the graphics card by providing more power to it????? :pt1cable: 
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April 10, 2011 12:14:27 AM

Does anyone think 73deg Celsius and 85% fan usage is normal with a 1-slot card cooling system for the 9800??? Also, my power supply is squealing, even when the computer is off, does anyone know how to make it stop?
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a b ) Power supply
April 10, 2011 6:16:26 AM

If you are having noise from the PSU when its off, your power might not be good at the socket. Get a surge protector or power conditioner if you can.

Also, I think your temps are a little high but are fairly normal. Fan speed you can set to whatever, try MSI Afterburner, it has a good sloping fan/temp thingy built in.
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April 10, 2011 4:51:38 PM

Thanks. Is a standard power strip good enough for surge protection?
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April 10, 2011 7:01:11 PM

A surge would cause quite a bit of damage to the computer. A power strip would most likely protect you from it, but if the noises you are hearing are power related, an ordinary power strip would not help at all. Do you live out near the end of a long power line? I have heard of people in a similar situation who were only getting some 80 or 90 of the 120 volts they should have been getting. If this is the case, it will place a large strain on your power supply (these people had most of their appliances damaged by the low power), and might cause the noise you are hearing.

To clarify: when a power supply makes noise, it is because some part is translating electrical energy to sound energy. The components which do this most are large capacitors and coils, because they are built in such a way that AC current can make them vibrate. If you take apart a power supply, you will see that many of the caps and coils have a hardened yellow goop on them. This is done to dampen the noise that they normally make under the kind of load that the circuit puts on them. Noise from the supply can indicate 1. The noise dampening compound was applied poorly, or is starting to fail (unlikely) 2. A part is failing 3. The supply is having amounts or types of load put on it for which it was not designed (this includes the loads placed on components by the power they are receiving from the power line) or 4. The supply was designed poorly. In trying to diagnose you problem, we are assuming that the noise is caused by cause #3.
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April 12, 2011 9:13:53 PM

I am in a high-rise, and actually the noise has no longer been happening for the past few days... but thanks for all the help with that!
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April 13, 2011 3:33:41 AM

You're welcome
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!