Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Surge protector questions

Last response: in Components
Share
April 12, 2011 9:04:42 PM

I'm looking for a basic surge protector to plug in my PC, Monitor, and speakers.

I was hoping to find something under $50, but when searching the forum, people always suggest UPCs which are very expensive. I don't care about being able to use my PC during a power outage.

Would something like this be enough?

Other than surge protection, what do I need?

BTW, I have an xfx pro750w psu. According to the manufacturer, it has Over power (OPP), over voltage (OVP), over current (OCP), over temperature (OTP), and short-circuit (SCP). Isn't OVP the same as surge protection?


April 13, 2011 12:27:28 AM

Three bad things can occur with incoming power depending on your local are. They are 1) Surge, 2) Spike, and 3) Sag.

This explains these well: http://www.dansdata.com/sbs9.htm

This is what I use: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

During severe storms, I unplug my computer from the wall socket. Mere turning it OFF is not sufficient because a lightning strike can jump switches that are turned OFF and find its way to the computer.

The incoming power in the area I live in, is fine.

Over voltage protection is a thermal overload bi-metal strip that heats up, bends, and trips the circuit turning it OFF. Similar to a overload relay.

Short circuit is an extremely high current (10,000 Amps in AC circuits).

Surge is analogous to a tidal wave (Tsunami).
m
0
l
April 13, 2011 1:19:13 AM

The MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) is the heart of surge suppressors. The role of the MOV is to divert surge current. However, MOVs wear out with use. As more surges are diverted, the MOVs life span shortens, and failure becomes imminent.

There is no forewarning or visual indications given - just failure. And while failing, they can reach very high temperatures, and actually start fires.

Most surge protectors will continue to function as a power strip, even though the surge trap mechanism may have been destroyed by the power spike. This presents two possible dangers:

1) If another power surge should occur, it can damage the equipment that is plugged into this surge protector, and

2) If sufficient voltage passes through the surge protector due to a second power spike, a resistant short may have been formed, allowing heating to occur and a fire to ignite.

When buying a surge protector, look for one with an indicator light that tells you if the protection components are functioning. All MOVs will burn out after repeated power surges. Without an indicator light, you have no way of knowing if your protector is still functioning properly. Unfortunately due to manufacturing differences, the light may be "on" or "off" during proper operation. It is therefore important to review the operating instructions provided with the surge protector.
m
0
l
Related resources
April 13, 2011 11:16:01 PM

Quote:
tie 3 knots in your psu cable. Bad lightning strikes it will save your pc.
You can use ferrite beads and looped the cords through it. You can do it with the phone lines as well.


You pulling my leg?
m
0
l
April 13, 2011 11:18:01 PM

One more thing, it seems that most surge protectors only seem to output 15A. Is that enough to run a PC? My PSU states that it can output 50A. What am I missing here?


*edit
Aaand, if I need to plug in 2 computers plus monitors and printers and stuff, is it better to have two surge protectors on 2 outlets, or is one enough for everything.
m
0
l
April 13, 2011 11:19:22 PM

Quote:
tie 3 knots in your psu cable. Bad lightning strikes it will save your pc.
You can use ferrite beads and looped the cords through it. You can do it with the phone lines as well.


That will help eliminate radio frequency (RF) interference, but not spikes!
m
0
l
April 13, 2011 11:38:26 PM

unpro said:
One more thing, it seems that most surge protectors only seem to output 15A. Is that enough to run a PC? My PSU states that it can output 50A. What am I missing here?


*edit
Aaand, if I need to plug in 2 computers plus monitors and printers and stuff, is it better to have two surge protectors on 2 outlets, or is one enough for everything.

15 Amps @ 110 Volts - approx 1,500 Watts. The PSU 50 Amps is at 12 Volts - approx 600 Watts (roughly 6 Amps at 110 Volts). From this, you will be maxing out the Amp capacity when you plug in 2 computers to one surge strip. Also, keep in mind that the wall outlet is usually wired for 15 Amps total in bedrooms and utility rooms. You also have to consider power requirements of monitors (on the label), and lamps plugged into wall outlets (figure 1 Amp for 100 Watts lamps). What about the TV power load? Any electric space heater in winter?
m
0
l
April 14, 2011 2:28:05 AM

This is great info. Thanks everyone!
m
0
l
April 14, 2011 4:14:08 AM

Quote:
tie 3 knots in your psu cable. Bad lightning strikes it will save your pc.
You can use ferrite beads and looped the cords through it. You can do it with the phone lines as well.



OK, I misspoke the first time: The FERRITE BEADS will only protect against RF interference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_bead

I forgot to cut out the bit about the knots in the power cable. I have never heard of it, but it is logical.
m
0
l
April 14, 2011 7:58:09 PM


That article is not very convincing (emphasis mine):

"Others have used ferrite beads and looped the cords through these. Some people report the same results doing the same trick with phone lines!"

"Try tying knots in your cords. Add the ferrite beads. Couldn't hurt to try."

Now, the only point I have tried to make is that according the electronics theory and practice ferrite beads will help to eliminate radio interference, but they will NOT stop a high DC current such as induced by a lightning strike. FYI, I have a US FCC commercial radio license which authorizes me to repair and certify aviation and marine radios and radar units.

Thanks for reading...I am done here!
m
0
l
!