Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Good time to buy a Sandy Bridge? Comparing the different models

Last response: in CPUs
Share
April 14, 2011 11:28:37 PM

hey guys,

I'm a little confused on which processor to buy of the Intel Sandy Bridge line. I don't do heavy graphically intense stuff on my computer but still want a solid chip of course. I don't play games, but do tons of multitasking. Is the Core i7-2600K an overkill? The only BIG feature they add to this chip (over the other Sandy Bridge chips) is hyper-threading, correct? What type of applications take advantage of this? I imagine I probably don't use them and probably won't for the foreseeable future.

I'm thinking I will go with the core i5-2500K. I like the fact it is unlocked, which may be advantageous to me in the future if I decide to overclock.

Is the only difference between the two different i7 processors (2600 & 2600K) is the overclocking capability? The price difference seems pretty minimal at $15 on newegg.com.

The Core i5 2500K seems like the sweet spot here and might go that direction. Just curious what you guys think.

Finally, is there any reason to wait to buy one of these Sandy Bridge processors (i.e. is Intel still working out the kinks, etc etc). Just want a stable chip that won't crash on me, and since these have been out for a while seems like this might be a good time.

Thanks for the help guys!
a b à CPUs
April 14, 2011 11:39:25 PM

The K versions of Sandy Bridge have HD3000 integrated graphics. The non-K versions have HD2000 graphics. Basically HD3000 has double the execution units of HD2000. If you are going to use a discrete graphics card, then the only real difference is overclocking capability.

Professional-level programs like Photoshop and audio encoding and such take advantage of HyperThreading.

If you want the ability to fully overclock a K CPU, make sure you get the current P67 chipset or the upcoming Z68 chipset.

The best choice for most users is the i5-2500K if they wish to overclock, or the regular i5-2500 if not an overclocker.
m
0
l
a c 131 à CPUs
April 15, 2011 12:02:22 AM

Right now, you haven't mentioned anything that would require anything more than a core i3. Can you give more details? What do you mean "multi-tasking"? Multitasking what?
I run virtual machines, folding, 20+ browser tabs, watching a movie, playing games without closing the previous things.... My phenom IIx6 is still overkill. I can't see any justification for anything more than a core i3 for what you have described.
If you are just an enthusiast, there is still no point in more than a 2500k due to cost/performance ratio beyond that.

Let's ask some more questions:
-How long will you keep the system, unaltered hardware-wise?
-What is the system you are upgrading from?
-Specifically what are your uses and what do you mean by "multi-tasking"?
m
0
l
Related resources
April 15, 2011 12:07:38 AM

If you enjoy benchmarking your machine and posting on nerdy forums about how awesome your rig is (like me) then you need the best-of-the-best i7....
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
April 15, 2011 2:46:08 AM

No its not the best time.If you want to wait for socket 2011 to come out then we can discuss things.Now i dont see anything amazing about the current line of SB chips.
m
0
l
April 15, 2011 3:30:45 AM

enzo matrix said:
Right now, you haven't mentioned anything that would require anything more than a core i3. Can you give more details? What do you mean "multi-tasking"? Multitasking what?
I run virtual machines, folding, 20+ browser tabs, watching a movie, playing games without closing the previous things.... My phenom IIx6 is still overkill. I can't see any justification for anything more than a core i3 for what you have described.
If you are just an enthusiast, there is still no point in more than a 2500k due to cost/performance ratio beyond that.

Let's ask some more questions:
-How long will you keep the system, unaltered hardware-wise?
-What is the system you are upgrading from?
-Specifically what are your uses and what do you mean by "multi-tasking"?


I'm coming from an AMD XP1800+ (I think that is what it is called...hehe). Obviously incredibly slow by today's standards.

I plan on keeping the system for quite a few years most likely (haven't built a computer in over 5 yrs.) which is why I'm trying to keep it future-proof to some degree.

I basically multitask by having several tabs open in my browser, ripping music/movies, watching movies/videos online, torrenting. Nothing crazy I guess. I'll probably get more into Photoshop once I learn it and finally get a good camera.

My primary concern is whether or not the system I'm about to build will become obsolete in 2 years. I want to be able to stream HD (1080P) w/o hiccups, etc etc. I know I don't need an i7 for this though. The machine will mainly be used for media purposes.

Another concern is whether or not this is a good time to build. I know technology is constantly evolving, but does Intel have any SUBSTANTIAL new releases coming up soon (soon as in 6-12 months)?

Thanks guys for your help.
m
0
l
April 15, 2011 3:40:51 AM

Well, there is always something new around the corner, but isn't the current release of Sandy Bridge processors a pretty big jump from their previous performance line? Isn't the updates coming in Q1 2012, just that, updates and nothing game-changing?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
April 15, 2011 3:49:05 AM

Around 10 percent performance in MOST applications.If you dont like overclocking then performance wise we have 20 to 50 percent.in otherwords the SB architecture clock to clock i around 10 percent.
m
0
l
April 15, 2011 3:53:43 AM

looking at eBay for a 2500K brings up this auction:

http://cgi.ebay.com/REDLINE-2500K-Extreme-Intel-Core-i5...

What is a Redline 2500K? Is it really that much of an improvement over a regular 2500K? One sold on eBay for $350. Seller says it will obliterate a 2600K. Just curious, because I can't find these versions on newegg or any other commercial sites.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
April 15, 2011 4:01:42 AM

bhome83 said:
looking at eBay for a 2500K brings up this auction:

http://cgi.ebay.com/REDLINE-2500K-Extreme-Intel-Core-i5...

What is a Redline 2500K? Is it really that much of an improvement over a regular 2500K? One sold on eBay for $350. Seller says it will obliterate a 2600K. Just curious, because I can't find these versions on newegg or any other commercial sites.


Quote:
Redline refers to the maximum engine speed at which an internal combustion engine or traction motor and its components are designed to operate without causing damage to the components themselves or other parts of the engine.[1] The redline of an engine depends on various factors such as stroke, mass of the components, displacement, composition of components, and balance of components.


Redline is just a word to emphasize to non enthusiast that i5 2500k is the one with the most speed or overclockability.It is still a i5 2500k model.
m
0
l
April 15, 2011 4:07:37 AM

why is it selling on eBay for $350 when you can get it on newegg.com for around $225?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
April 15, 2011 4:08:46 AM

bhome83 said:
why is it selling on eBay for $350 when you can get it on newegg.com for around $225?

ask the ebay vendor.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
April 15, 2011 5:05:33 AM

bhome83 said:
why is it selling on eBay for $350 when you can get it on newegg.com for around $225?

Because ebayers are gullible?
m
0
l
April 15, 2011 5:36:45 AM

bhome83 said:
why is it selling on eBay for $350 when you can get it on newegg.com for around $225?


because seller is shipping worldwide, so probably an international buyer
m
0
l
April 15, 2011 9:23:31 AM

cjl said:
Because ebayers are gullible?

Quote:
because seller is shipping worldwide, so probably an international buyer


Derp, can't even read the description, its a cherry picked CPU out of the 2500k that has been tested and proven to overclock to a certain degree and overclocks marginally better than some more average 2500ks in the current line up.

No two processors are the same, even if its got the same model number.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
April 15, 2011 11:53:12 AM

hcstnfrd said:
Quote:
because seller is shipping worldwide, so probably an international buyer


Derp, can't even read the description, its a cherry picked CPU out of the 2500k that has been tested and proven to overclock to a certain degree and overclocks marginally better than some more average 2500ks in the current line up.

No two processors are the same, even if its got the same model number.

Ahh, but do you trust the person who overclocked it? It's entirely possible that in their "testing", they had it up to 95C at 1.6V. Honestly, I'd rather take a brand new one than one that was overclocked previously by some random ebayer.
m
0
l
April 16, 2011 11:07:41 AM

I'm just filling those in who don't have any reading comprehension skills.
m
0
l
!