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New Gaming/Video Editing PC

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  • New Build
  • Gaming
  • Video Editing
  • Systems
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Last response: in Systems
January 20, 2011 4:38:04 AM

Hey motherboarders,

I am thinking about building a new gaming/video editing computer. So the parts I am thinking of:

Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 Mid-tower
CPU: AMD Phenom II X6 1100T
Ram: 6GB DDR3 2000Mhz
GPU: SLI GTX 470s (2)
PSU: To be determined
Mobo: To be determined

Now first off I would like to know what you guys think I should look at for a PSU and Mobo. From the first glance of searching I didn't find a good AMD board with Nvidia chipset. From what I understand I will not be able to run SLI on a board with ATI chipset unless I use a cracked driver (or something like that) which I do not want to do.

I have no clue about PSUs. I don't know whats good and whats not. I was thinking a 700-750w?

Also I chose that case because I am not a fan of full towers. I don't have room for one and to be quite honest I think they can be an eye sore. I like that case because I can fit the longer GPUs and it has great air flow.

Anyways what do you all think?

More about : gaming video editing

January 20, 2011 6:51:12 AM

6 gigs of ram is for i7s, not amd cpus... Get 8 gigs of 1600mhz g.skill.

Correct on the sli, go for ati, maybe 5870.. I think there are 2 boards that support sli... But even that is glitched...

You only need around 650 watts if it is certified, I always say to get bigger so you can upgrade later on...


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a b 4 Gaming
January 20, 2011 3:49:47 PM

A quality modern PSU has full range active PFC (no little voltage switch) and 80+ certification. Antec, Seasonic, Corsair, XFX, and Enermax are among the better brands. For a pair of GTX470s, I think 750W would be a good size.
Based on the PSU calculator at http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine , you could use 650W, but you'd probably be outside its most efficient operating range.
For a high-end build, take a look at Sandy Bridge. It outperforms AMD by a sizable margin, and most LGA1155 mobos support both SLI and Crossfire.
I would not attempt to SLI a pair of HOT GTX470 cards in that case, no way no how. If you want to use that case, get a single GTX570.
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January 22, 2011 8:45:30 PM

Thanks for the input guys.

For the GPUs, I am planning on add Zalman coolers on both to help with the heat. Also with 3 intake 120s and 3 exhaust 120s the case should vent the heat pretty well. Either that or I will just get a single GTX580.

As for the PSU, I will probably end up getting a Corsair 750w.

As for as the CPU, I am dead set on AMD. That is what I have always used and the Intel's are just a bit out of budget (at least more than I am comfortable with).

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a b 4 Gaming
January 22, 2011 9:04:58 PM

The Coolermaster Elite 430, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... does not have that many usable fan openings (a long PSU will block the bottom one), and only comes with two fans. Although it has a bottom-mounted PSU, it has no cable management. I don't think you should try to SLI two GTX470s in it.
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