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Alternative for Intel Xeon for dual cpu's?

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April 18, 2011 12:22:07 PM

Okay guys, I have a question, which might sound king of bizzare and wierd. But, I simply have to ask it. I want to make a new computer which has around 8-12 GB of RAM, as well as two nvidia GPU's. But I would like to have two slots for a 2 cpu's. I know this si possible because I have surfing the web for some time. But the only problem I come up with is the fact that the most suportive dual cpu configuration is Intel Xeon. This troubles me, since one Intel Xeon coast roughly $1,500. So, can anybody tell me if there is a cpu which supports dual of them running at the same time, and possibly the motherboard which it could be mounted on it! Possibly the next best alternative for my search of a powerful pc!

Thx in advance :) 
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a b å Intel
April 18, 2011 12:35:58 PM

Could you explain why you need a dual CPU system? Xeon processors are expensive, but so are Opteron processors that can be used in dual socket motherboards.
April 18, 2011 3:28:41 PM

I mean, a motherboard which supports TWO cpu's. For example if you want a equivelent to a i7 extreme you go for Xeon, but if you want two i7 extreme's you can't do that on one motherboard, thus having to switch to a Xeon and combing it with another Xeon!
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a c 188 à CPUs
a b å Intel
April 18, 2011 5:23:53 PM

Intel® Xeon® processors like the Xeon 5600’s come with an extra instruction set that allows them to run in a dual processor configuration. Without that Instruction set they wouldn’t be able to work in a dual processor configuration and since we only put that instruction set on Xeons.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
April 18, 2011 6:36:25 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
Intel® Xeon® processors like the Xeon 5600’s come with an extra instruction set that allows them to run in a dual processor configuration. Without that Instruction set they wouldn’t be able to work in a dual processor configuration and since we only put that instruction set on Xeons.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team


And how is this helpful?

Thanks for trying though appreciate it!
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April 18, 2011 7:05:52 PM

I am not sure but I think I remember something about
using dual I7s on X58 series mobos
I have to do some research on this
a c 113 à CPUs
a b å Intel
April 18, 2011 7:27:00 PM

Ato pecur said:
I mean, a motherboard which supports TWO cpu's. For example if you want a equivelent to a i7 extreme you go for Xeon, but if you want two i7 extreme's you can't do that on one motherboard, thus having to switch to a Xeon and combing it with another Xeon!

As IntelEnthusiast pointed out to you, you need Xeon processors that have the embedded logic to run on dual socket motherboards. I7 processors don't have the extra logic required and they just won't work.
April 18, 2011 7:42:31 PM

GhislainG said:
As IntelEnthusiast pointed out to you, you need Xeon processors that have the embedded logic to run on dual socket motherboards. I7 processors don't have the extra logic required and they just won't work.


ohhhhhhhhhhhh, I get it now......
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April 18, 2011 7:48:41 PM

The main reason for Xeons and Opterons is stability. As they are expected to generally function 24/7 with maximum uptime (baring system admin action such as installing updates and general mucking about) they are cherry picked on their ability to do so and thus are more expensive since fewer samples per die qualify to be a workstation part as opposed to a desktop part.

If you don't need that stability you're better off with desktop parts. Depending on what you are doing you may instead want to distribute the workload among 2 or 3 single socket servers with desktop CPUs as opposed to a single expensive dual Xeon machine
!