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Video Editing with Adobe Creative Suite 5 (CS5)

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January 24, 2011 5:41:09 AM

January 21, 2011

QUESTIONS:
(1) Are all hardware parts that I've listed compatible with one another?
(2) Is there anything that stands out that I may not have thought of?

THANK YOU!

Computer Build for Adobe Creative Suite 5 (CS5) – [Videoing Editing]


(1) CPU -- AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition Thuban 3.2 GHz 6x512 KB L2 Cache Socket AM3 125W Six-Core Processor $229.99

(2) MOBO -- ASUS Crosshair IV Formula AMD-890FX $225.99

(3) GPU -- GeForce GTX470 $261

(4) RAM -- 16 GB Crucial Ballistix Extream Performance 240-pin DIMM, DDR3 PC3-12800 $200

(5) CASE -- Cooler Master HAF X = $179.00

(6) PSU -- Corsair CMPSU-750TX 750-Watt TX Series 80 Plus Certified Power Supply compatible with Intel Core i7 and Core i5 by Corsair $110

(7) HDD_1 (Configured in RAID?) -- Western Digital 300 GB VelociRaptor SATA 10,000 RPM 16 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Enterprise Hard Drive WD3000HLFS $170
HDD_2 -- Western Digital 300 GB VelociRaptor SATA 10,000 RPM 16 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Enterprise Hard Drive WD3000HLFS $170

(8) OPTICAL_1 -- DVD+/- RW, Lightscribe $30
(9) OPTICAL_2 -- HP Black Blu-ray Burner SATA bd340i LightScribe Support
Type: Internal Blu-ray Burner $153

(10) OS -- Windows 7, 64 Bit Ultimate -- $270

Dual Monitors on-hand

TOTAL PRICE: $2000

(Windows PC) System Requirements for Adobe CS5:
http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/systemreqs/

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 requires a 64-bit operating system.
Intel® Core™2 Duo or AMD Phenom® II processor; 64-bit support required
64-bit operating system required: Microsoft® Windows Vista® Home Premium, Business, Ultimate, or Enterprise with Service Pack 1 or Windows® 7
2GB of RAM (4GB or more recommended)
10GB of available hard-disk space for installation; additional free space required during installation (cannot install on removable flash-based storage devices)
7200 RPM hard drive for editing compressed video formats; RAID 0 for uncompressed
1280x900 display with OpenGL 2.0–compatible graphics card
Adobe-certified GPU card for GPU-accelerated performance
Adobe-certified card for capture and export to tape for SD/HD workflows
OHCI-compatible IEEE 1394 port for DV and HDV capture, export to tape, and transmit to DV device
Sound card compatible with ASIO protocol or Microsoft Windows Driver Model
DVD-ROM drive compatible with dual-layer DVDs (DVD+-R burner for burning DVDs; Blu-ray burner for creating Blu-ray Disc media)
QuickTime 7.6.2 software required for QuickTime features
Broadband Internet connection required for online services*

Supported NVIDIA graphics cards for GPU acceleration:
http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/systemreqs/

GeForce GTX 285 (Windows and Mac OS)
GeForce GTX 470 (Windows) NOTE: GeForce GTX 480 is not included in list, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. Price, however, is about $400, vs. $261 for GTX 470.
Quadro 4000 (Windows and Mac OS)
Quadro 5000 (Windows)
Quadro 5000M (Windows)
Quadro FX 3800 (Windows)
Quadro FX 4800 (Windows and Mac OS)
Quadro FX 5800 (Windows)
Quadro CX

NOTES:

(1) On CPU:
http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/amd_phenom2_x6_...

(2) On MOBO:
*There are a number of companies making enthusiast-level AMD motherboards, but when AMD shipped out review samples of their AMD Phenom II X6 1090T 6-core processor, the Crosshair IV was the motherboard they included.
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten... (Note: Only SATA connectors; no IDE)

kenkyle@mail.com
January 24, 2011 7:37:15 AM

No on the CPU and no on the board.

0. Check out my siggy for more builds :D 

1. Sandy Bridge is out and the i5 2500K performs at about the level of a i7 980X which the 1090T is no where near that performance. So get the 2500K. At this point if your budget is more than 700$ no reason to go AMD. I have no bias really as I personally use an AMD 955 build, but as of this release, AMD is kind of not worth it anymore.

2. Boards don't need to be enthusiast boards anymore. The Maximus, Rampage, or Crosshair boards are just not worth their costs. The Maximus IV (if you plan to go SB) OC about the same as a Asrock Extreme4 with Bios revision and that's about 200$ less. Also the Maximus imo is just WAY overpriced. It's practically 100$ more than any other enthusiast competitor. I'm referring to the Asrock Fatality Professional board. As you guessed it, my mobo recommendation is the Asrock Extreme 4.

3. Your storage has a bit of issues. One being for 350$ Velociraptors just aren't worth their costs anymore. SSDs blow them out of the water and for their price you could get a decent SSD and a 1tb HDD for the same price. My suggestion is getting 2 SSDs, (Two Vertex 2 60gb or Two Mushkin Callisto 60gb), and putting them in RAID. Or get one Mushkin/OCZ Callisto/Vertex 2 120gb and just run it singly. It'll be faster than a RAID 0 Velociraptor setup and cheaper and quieter. Then use the 90$ saved and pickup a Samsung F3 1TB for main storage.
2 SSDs (120 each = 240) + 1 Samsung F3 1tb (60$ @ Amazon) = 300$ save 50$.

Finally GPU, wait for the GTX 560 to come out, it should pop up on the Adobe support list once out. So... Yeah
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January 25, 2011 6:17:55 AM

FROM: AZNSHINOBI

aznshinobi said:


No on the CPU and no on the board.........
Finally GPU, wait for the GTX 560 to come out, it should pop up on the Adobe support list once out. So... Yeah





January 25, 2011

Dear AZNSHINOBI,

Thank you very much for your reply.

AZNSHINOBI, you believe my proposed computer build is good, except I should consider changing to the items below:

1) Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K [Amazon = $230, incl. shipping], and

2) ASRock LGA1156/ Intel P55/ DDR3/ Quad CrossFireX & Quad SLI/ A&GBE/ ATX Motherboard P55 EXTREME [Newegg = $153, incl. shipping]

ADDITIONALLY, you suggest (and I really like the idea) replacing the HDDs with SSDs, either, for example:

2 X (in RAID) Mushkin Enhanced Callisto Deluxe 60 GB Solid State Drive MKNSSDCL60 GB-DX (Black) [Amazon = $130 ea. / Total $260, incl. shipping]

OR A SINGLE:

OCZ Vertex 2 OCZSSD3-2VTX120G 3.5" 120GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) [Newegg = $230, incl. shipping]


NOTES:

(1) For video storage, I already have one MyBook 1TB, and one MyBook 2TB.

(2) AZNSHINOBI, what is your advice regarding what I’ve always kind of read―that for video rendering, the best setup is one HD for the Operating System and a second internal HD for all video files? After completion of a project, of course, one can transfer all video files to storage to clear the second internal HD for the next project.

Finally, AZNSHINOBI, you suggest waiting for the Nvidia GTX 560, which must be right on the edge of release, although I did find one available:

PREORDER ONLY -- Geforce GTX560 Ti GC 1 GB DDR5 Video Card 56NGH6HS4IXZ [Amazon Pre-order Only = $258, incl. shipping], and one for sale:

Galaxy Geforce GTX560 Ti GC 1 GB DDR5 Video Card 56NGH6HS4IXZ [Amazon listing, shipped by HPP Enterprises = $336, incl. shipping]

Notes of interest on GTX 560:

(1) From a Website: “We expect some average 15 to 20 percent performance increase from GTX 560 compared to GTX 460. Note that the card will require two 6-pin PCIe power connectors, falling in line with most cards in the range. Initial speculation puts the price around $350 to $365.”

(2) AZNSHINOBI, you indicate you believe the GTX 560 should pop up on the Adobe support list once out, but I kind of believe that Adobe is very slow to update, or perhaps there’s a chance the card will not be supported at all. The GTX 480, for example, is not specifically listed as supported, and I’m wondering how long it’s been out.

Fortunately, regarding my computer build project, I can buy the GPU last—say, in two or three months. So, we may know more by then.

RAM confirmation/recalculation from initial proposal:

8GB Kit (4GBx2), 240-pin DIMM, DDR3 PC3-10600 memory module
CT2KIT51264BA1339
Module Size: 8GB Kit (4GBx2)
Package: 240-pin DIMM
Feature: DDR3 PC3-10600
Specs: DDR3 PC3-10600 • CL=9 • Unbuffered • NON-ECC • DDR3-1333 • 1.5V • 512Meg x 64
http://www.crucial.com/store/partspecs.aspx?IMODULE=CT2...
For 16GB = $100 X 2 = Total of $200

Note: AZNSHINOBI, I’m concerned that sometime in the future, I may want to upgrade to 32GB of RAM, but isn’t it true the MOBO only allows a max of 16GB?

Total Prices: So, let’s see what we have, regarding total price for this package contrasted against my original proposal.

Original Revised
CPU 230 230
MOBO 226 153
GPU (GTX470) 261 261
CASE 179 179
PSU 110 110
HDD/SSD 1 170 130
HDD/SSD 2 170 130
RAM (16GB) 200 200
OPTICALS 183 183
WINDOWS 7 270 270

TOTALS: 1999 1846 SAVINGS: $153 (Plus I love the SSDs vs. the HDDs!)

And finally, AZNSHINOBI, you’re believing that the Intel Quad Core will be as good as, or better, than using the AMD 6 Core, right?

THANK YOU VERY MUCH, AZNSHINOBI !!!

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Related resources
January 25, 2011 9:17:52 AM

Where are you from, Ken?

Since this rig if primarily dedicated to video editing, I assume you won't be adding in a second graphics card in the future? In that case, you don't need a 750W PSU. Your system won't draw more than 450W under load (whether you opt for a 470 or a 560), unless you've got some crazy OCing going on. An efficient 550-600W PSU would be about right.
On that note though, if the Corsair has an appetizing rebate or something, go for it.

Are you buying from Amazon?
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January 25, 2011 3:30:45 PM

blackjellognomes said:
Where are you from, Ken?

Since this rig if primarily dedicated to video editing, I assume you won't be adding in a second graphics card in the future? In that case, you don't need a 750W PSU. Your system won't draw more than 450W under load (whether you opt for a 470 or a 560), unless you've got some crazy OCing going on. An efficient 550-600W PSU would be about right.
On that note though, if the Corsair has an appetizing rebate or something, go for it.

Are you buying from Amazon?



Hi BLACKJELLOGNOME,

Thank you for responding to my post.

I'm from a small town in Illinois, about 10 miles east of St. Louis.

Yes, this rig is primarily for video editing with Adobe CS5. And, as you said, I could get by with less horsepower, I'm sure. At the following website, for example, they recommend a 600 to 650W range (single GTX470 in an i7 configuration):
http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/04/27/gtx_480_470_p...

However, the prices seem very comparable between the various PSUs in this particular wattage range, or am I missing something?

That aside, (since I'm new to computer building) why are you suggesting a smaller wattage PSU? Is it a matter of efficiency and no overkill--and therefore such would save me on the electric bill? Or is it because I would have less concerns with heat buildup in the case? Or does it boil down to spending money wisely? And if it's "all of the above," please mention why you decided to respond to my post regarding the PSU specifically. That way, I'll know what to consider important on any future build.

As you can see, I'm rather lost, trying to match up all the components, which seems to be as crucial a task as properly putting them together.

On a different note, BLACKJELLOGNOME, do all the other parts seem to match up and be about right? And, finally, how do you feel about the Cooler Master HAF X case, and should I consider a liquid cooling system, versus simply fans?

Regarding where I am buying, once I nail down the parts selection, I will search the Internet to find the absolute lowest price for each, and then buy from them. For now, I'm just grabbing prices off the net as I find them with only a little bit of effort to locate the best price. So far, I haven't found significant rebate offers, including on the PSU.

Thank you very much, BLACKJELLOGNOME. I appreciate your taking the time to respond.

--Ken
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January 25, 2011 6:42:57 PM

Well one thing, the 560 will most likely be on the support list since as the 560 review on THG says, it's basically a direct replacement for the 470. It's the same price and a bit better with lower power consumption and cooler as well. So theres that. Prices confirmed its 250. It's already out in Newegg.

And yes, you should have a main internal storage so the Samsung F3 1TB I suggested. They have the SSDs to run Adobe bridge or just boot those video files. I find that should work just nicely.

Because you are video editing, you don't need to get LCing. The main reason I say this is because video editing is mostly CPU power. The 32nm Intel chips run cool and need not go into water cooling. While the 560 is revised for quieter and better cooling than the 470.

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January 25, 2011 11:16:32 PM

aznshinobi said:
Well one thing, the 560 will most likely be on the support list since as the 560 review on THG says, it's basically a direct replacement for the 470. It's the same price and a bit better with lower power consumption and cooler as well. So theres that. Prices confirmed its 250. It's already out in Newegg.

And yes, you should have a main internal storage so the Samsung F3 1TB I suggested. They have the SSDs to run Adobe bridge or just boot those video files. I find that should work just nicely.

Because you are video editing, you don't need to get LCing. The main reason I say this is because video editing is mostly CPU power. The 32nm Intel chips run cool and need not go into water cooling. While the 560 is revised for quieter and better cooling than the 470.



January 25, 2011

Dear AZNSHINOBI,

Thank you very much for your second reply.

I apologize for not picking up on the fact that the 1TB was the second internal HD. But, yeah, I see what you’re driving at there. And in that case, I’m thinking I should go with the single SSD (120GB) for my OS and then the 1TB for the video files.

Also, thanks for reassuring me about not needing liquid cooling. That’s a relief (because of the added expense, of course, but mostly because I’m not familiar with doing that at all). But with the whole construction project, I’m trusting in my dictum that I can do anything if I have good instructions to read and follow—I once changed a car engine by reading the shop manual word for word as I did the work.

And, yes, you’ve convinced me about the GTX 560, and I looked it up on Newegg. Great!

So to recap, I should go with:

CPU -- Intel Core i5-2500K, Quad Core = $230
MOBO -- ASRock Intel P55 EXTREME 4 = $153
GPU -- Nvidia GeForce GTX560 = $250
CASE -- Cooler Master HAF X = $179
PSU -- Corsair CMPSU-750TX 750-Watt TX Series 80 = $110
SSD_1 -- OCZ Vertex 2, 120GB SATA II = $230
HDD_2 -- Samsung F3 1TB = $65
RAM -- (2 X) 8GB Kit (4GBx2), 240-pin DIMM, DDR3 PC3-10600 = $200
OPTICALS -- $183
WINDOWS 7 -- $270

Total: $1870

Note: AZNSHINOBI, I’m concerned that sometime in the future, I may want to upgrade to 32GB of RAM, but isn’t it true the MOBO only allows a max of 16GB?

And finally, AZNSHINOBI, you’re believing that the Intel Quad Core will be as good as, or better, than using the AMD 6 Core, right?

THANK YOU VERY MUCH, AZNSHINOBI !!!
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January 26, 2011 1:06:04 AM

Ummm well the board for Asrock states it can support 32gb of RAM, but why would you need that much ram? 8gb is all apps especially editing need. 16gb at the most. As for the CPU I don't know the max it reconizes.

Yes the i5 is better than the AMD 6 core, untill the release of Bulldozer, or maybe :p 
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January 26, 2011 3:22:43 AM

aznshinobi said:
Ummm well the board for Asrock states it can support 32gb of RAM, but why would you need that much ram? 8gb is all apps especially editing need. 16gb at the most. As for the CPU I don't know the max it reconizes.

Yes the i5 is better than the AMD 6 core, untill the release of Bulldozer, or maybe :p 




January 25, 2011

Hi AZNSHINOBI,

Double check please that I have the right motherboard (that it is the one you recommended). If so, perhaps I’m reading the numbers wrong regarding the max RAM supported. Then too, I didn’t know that the CPU is a factor in limiting RAM. Am I wrong about that? Here ya go:

ASRock LGA1156/ Intel P55/ DDR3/ Quad CrossFireX & Quad SLI/ A&GBE/ ATX Motherboard P55 EXTREME

Product Description (Off of Amazon):
http://www.amazon.com/ASRock-P55-CrossFireX-Motherboard...


Specifications: Mfr Part Number: P55 EXTREME, CPU: Socket 1156 Support Intel Core i7 & Core i5 Processor; Supports Intel Turbo Boost Technology, Advanced V8 + 2 Power Phase Design; Support Hyper-Threading Technology, Chipset: Intel P55, Memory: 4x 240pin DDR3-2600+(OC)/2133(OC)/1866(OC)/1600/1333/1066 DIMMs,

non-ECC, un-buffered, Dual Channel, Up to 16GB, Slots: 3x PCI-Express x16 Slots

(Support ATI Quad/3-Way/CrossFireX Technology; Support nVidia Quad SLI/SLI;
Support PCI-Express 2.0); 1x PCI-Express 2.0 slot(2.5 GT/s); 3x PCI Slots, IDE/SATA: 1x ATA-133 Channel; 6x SATA2 Ports, 1x eSATA Port, Support RAID 0, 1, 5, 10, Audio: Realtek ALC890 7.1-Channel Windows Vista Premium Level HD Audio CODEC, supports DAC with 110dB dynamic range & Premium Blu-ray audio, LAN: Realtek RTL8111DL PCI-Express x1 Gigabit Ethernet Controller, Ports: 14x USB 2.0 Ports (7 rear, 6 by headers, one by Powered eSATAII/USB Connector); 2x IEEE 1394 Ports (1 rear, 1 by headers); 2x PS/2 Ports; 1x RJ45 LAN Port; 1x Coaxial SPDIF Out; 1x Optical SPDIF Out; Audio I/O Jacks, Power Connector: 1x 24pin Main Power, 1x 8pin CPU Power, Form Factor: ATX, 12 x 9.6 inch / 30.5 x 24.4 cm

And you're probably right about not needing 32GB of RAM, but it will be nice to know the system's limitations.

Thank you, AZNSHINOBI.
--Ken

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January 26, 2011 3:39:31 AM

That is NOT the correct board. For the SandyBridge CPU that you are opting for (and I totally agree with the advice you've been given) then you will need the ASRock P65 1155 Extreme4. Note that the difference vs. the board you have listed, which specifies P55 1156 (this is a previous version of the extreme series and will not work with your build). Be sure you buy the P65 1155 Extreme4.

I also pose the question to AZNSHINOBI why everyone seems to recommend the ASRock Extreme4 instead of the ASUS P8P65 Pro?
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January 26, 2011 4:01:32 AM

Badgj, just for your future reference. It is P67 not P65. I'm surprised you remember the name of the Asus board but you got the P67 wrong.

The Extreme4 is better in many ways than one.
1st. It's cheaper
2nd. Same qualities in some cases. One being it also has 3 PCI 2.1 slots for 8x/8x/4x
3rd. Asrock is basically a department of Asus (it actually is)
4th. Good OC's, up to 5.1ghz w/ BIOS update (same as ASUS P8P65 Pro)

They don't sell it at Amazon.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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January 26, 2011 5:51:21 AM

Hi there, BADGJ, thanks for responding to my post.

I'll compare the three boards listed in more detail. Per Newegg prices that I've looked at so far, there is negligible difference in price between the P67 and the P55--$156 vs. $153,

So far, I haven't been able to locate a site that sells the P8P65, even the ASUS (U.S.) site! I guess I'll have to search for an ASUS board that supports the i5 LGA 1156, or something like that.

Meanwhile, back on the ranch, it occurred to me that shouldn't I consider a SATA III SSD, vs. a SATA II? The Asrock P55 Extreme 4 board supports SATA III. So instead of: OCZ Vertex 2, 120GB SATA II = $230, why not go with, for example, a Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) - $264?

Thank you guys. I super appreciate your posts, your expertise, and your patience. By the time we're done here, I already know I'm gonna have a killer machine!

--Ken
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January 26, 2011 8:08:59 PM

As I wrote in my post, Badgj got the numbers wrong.
He mixed up the P65 with P67 the asus board he posted doesn't exist. You want a P67 board Ken. P55 is for the older LGA 1156 socket. The socket you want is LGA 1155.

Anyway the reason is because the crucial isn't very much faster than the Sata II SSDs. If you want to get a Sata 3 SSD wait for the Sandforce 2000 controllers. There faster. They boast 480 reads so yeahhh. SF controllers are the best
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January 26, 2011 9:57:58 PM

kenkyle said:
Hi there, BADGJ, thanks for responding to my post.

I'll compare the three boards listed in more detail. Per Newegg prices that I've looked at so far, there is negligible difference in price between the P67 and the P55--$156 vs. $153,

So far, I haven't been able to locate a site that sells the P8P65, even the ASUS (U.S.) site! I guess I'll have to search for an ASUS board that supports the i5 LGA 1156, or something like that.

Meanwhile, back on the ranch, it occurred to me that shouldn't I consider a SATA III SSD, vs. a SATA II? The Asrock P55 Extreme 4 board supports SATA III. So instead of: OCZ Vertex 2, 120GB SATA II = $230, why not go with, for example, a Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) - $264?

Thank you guys. I super appreciate your posts, your expertise, and your patience. By the time we're done here, I already know I'm gonna have a killer machine!

--Ken


Hey Ken, sorry for the mixup. As aznshinobi said, in my previous post, the P65 should be replaced with P67. I realized that I was typing P67 wrong about 2 hours later while I was out running errands. Thankfully it looks like nobody got hurt as a result of the mixup though! ;0) Anyways, sorry for the mixup. If you look for the ASUS P8P67 PRO you'll turn up some results.
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January 27, 2011 2:51:16 AM

Since this is for Adobe Premiere CS 5, you'll want to check out some guidance on the hard drive setup:

Adobe Premiere Generic Guideline for Disk Setup

Your config with only 2 disks is not recommended. The recommendation seems to be 3 disks minimum due to the way Premiere handles source video, project files, caching, exports, etc. I know you mentioned you have the MyBook drives but those are likely only good for storage and backup, not active editing. I'm not an expert, only someone who has been doing some research for a build of my own. I found the link above very helpful.

Also, for video editing in Premiere 5, you don't need a great video card. I believe any series 400 and above will get you the benefits of Premiere's "Mercury engine" which uses NVIDIA's CUDA. I've read that the NVIDIA 450 GTS cards are good, low cost cards (< $150) that fit this requirement.

As others have already suggested, you want the latest Sandy Bridge chipset. You'll benefit from the 2600K processor with a P67 motherboard. Premiere and other video/image editing apps will make use of the 2600K over the 2500K. I'll leave it to others to give their opinion about the exact boards to use. Everyone seems to have their favorite vendor based on past experiences.

The one big knock against the Sandy Bridge chipset from the video editing crowd is that it's not a good fit if you're going to put a decent RAID card in the box. This isn't an issue for me, as I'm just getting started with the whole video editing thing, but I know those who shoot and edit videos professionally need hardware RAIDs and Sandy Bridge isn't the best fit due to the limited PCI 2.1 slots running at 16x. It doesn't sound like this will be an issue for you either though.





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January 27, 2011 3:07:51 AM

^ That's what I thought as well, but the list on Premiere gave me thoughts otherwise =P So Look around and maybe you'll find some evidence for other Cuda Support.
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January 28, 2011 7:21:31 PM

aznshinobi said:
^ That's what I thought as well, but the list on Premiere gave me thoughts otherwise =P So Look around and maybe you'll find some evidence for other Cuda Support.



It's not on the official support list, but supposedly any 400 and higher card (with CUDA) with 1 GB of RAM will work:

http://blog.krama.tv/hacking-adobe-premiere-cs5-to-enab...
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January 28, 2011 7:30:19 PM

Ahhh I see.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/the-sandy-bridge-rev...

You may want to read through that. Even though Premiere offers Cuda support it doesn't mean it gives better quality pic. SB pure doing its job gives the better quality video than Cuda helping. Look at the review at the bottom. IT says when Cuda is used to transcode it gave a worse quality picture than pure i5/i7 2500K/2600K transcoding.
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January 28, 2011 9:26:17 PM

aznshinobi said:
Ahhh I see.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/the-sandy-bridge-rev...

You may want to read through that. Even though Premiere offers Cuda support it doesn't mean it gives better quality pic. SB pure doing its job gives the better quality video than Cuda helping. Look at the review at the bottom. IT says when Cuda is used to transcode it gave a worse quality picture than pure i5/i7 2500K/2600K transcoding.


Yep, read that. Good article. That's just talking about transcoding, not about the other operations that Adobe's Mercury engine speeds up with a CUDA enabled GPU like previews and rendering effects and transitions in real time (or closer to it).

Plus, QuickSync isn't available on P67 boards, so you have to pick your poison. Go without QuickSync (on P67) and get overclocking of a 2500/2600k processor and discrete GPU, or get QuickSync (on H67) and lose overclocking and a discrete GPU. I still can't believe this is the choice Intel has left us with. I would've thought the P67 chipset would include QuickSync and discrete GPU. That would seem the logical thing to do, but maybe it's a legit limitation of the architecture? Not sure.
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January 28, 2011 9:59:33 PM

I understand quicksync isn't availble for p67's I'm just using that article to explain that Cuda isn't always good for editing/transcoding.
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!