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[Solved]New Build - Motherboard lights up, fans spin but will not boot

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January 26, 2011 4:47:52 PM

[Solved]
So after getting some feeback from all of you (specifically clarkjd thanks!) i went to Microcenter and had them run some tests on my motherboard, processor and ram. The tests were good and they were able to get it to POST. So then i tried a different PSU the store provided and viola then systemed booted no problem.

I then exchanged my Antec TruePower 650 Supply for a new one, and the system still wouldn't post. So for whatever reason the TruPower PSU just doesn't play nice with the DP67BG motherboard. I then picked up a Corsair GS600 PSU and everything worked perfect. I went home setup everything and now my system is running as smooth as butter. Thanks to you all.


I'm a first time computer builder and recently put my computer together. When i press the power button the system will not boot. The motherboard lights up and the fans spin but i hear no beeps. There is a LCD screen on the motherboard that reads "00" and does not change. My optical drive has power and open and closes, and i believe my HDD is spinning.

This is a new system so i have not changed the BIOS or anything (the system has never booted). I troubled shooted with my local Microcenter and came to the conclusion that maybe it was a defective part. So i went out and got a replacement processor, motherboard, and graphics cards. Once i received the replacement parts i assembled the computer again, and i have the exact same problem. Below is my system specs:

Intel i7 - 2600 processor
Intel DP67BG Motherboard
4 sticks of Ballistix 2GB DDR3-1600 1.65 Volts -----Total of 8gb of RAM
NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450 Graphics Card
Stock CPU cooler came with the processor
Antec TruePower TP-650 650W Power Supply
Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s
Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC064MAG-1G1 SATA 6.0Gb/s
Antec Three Hundred Case
LG Blu-ray Burner WH10LS30

Things I've Tried to Fix the problem

1. I've had the PSU tested and it was confirmed as working.
2. I'ved tried 1 stick of ram, and no sticks of ram and i still get no beeps
3. I'ved tried booting with just the processor, heatsink fan, and power plugged in, and still no beeps
4. I've replaced the processor, motherboard and graphics card still wont boot
5. Took my computer in to Microcenter and had them troubleshoot with me
5. I've come to Tom's Hardware forum to hopefully get some help :D 

Any information will be greatly appreciated Thanks in advance. I can also provide links to all of my system components if need be. i just wanted to keep this thread as short as possible.
January 26, 2011 5:23:00 PM

youngbreed said:

Things I've Tried to Fix the problem

1. I've had the PSU tested and it was confirmed as working.
2. I'ved tried 1 stick of ram, and no sticks of ram and i still get no beeps
3. I'ved tried booting with just the processor, heatsink fan, and power plugged in, and still no beeps
4. I've replaced the processor, motherboard and graphics card still wont boot
5. Took my computer in to Microcenter and had them troubleshoot with me
5. I've come to Tom's Hardware forum to hopefully get some help :D 

Any information will be greatly appreciated Thanks in advance. I can also provide links to all of my system components if need be. i just wanted to keep this thread as short as possible.


Have you checked to make sure that the CPU power (4-pin connector near the CPU) is plugged in? That's kinda what this sounds like (CPU wouldn't be powered, so it wouldn't be doing anything, which means that the POST wouldn't progress, which would cause the LCD to stay at 00 and no beeping...)
a b B Homebuilt system
January 26, 2011 5:28:09 PM

I would double check all connections, specifically, the cpu aux power connections from PSU to mb, and, the cpu fan (MB to heat sink fan), both of which will require connections before the MB/CPU will work....

(Just because your PSU 'tests good' does not mean it has enough power to drive a full system; you shold be able to fully remove the gpu, and perhaps have the mb beep a code repeatedly that it cant find a video adapter...)
Related resources
January 26, 2011 6:07:24 PM

killersquirel11 said:
Have you checked to make sure that the CPU power (4-pin connector near the CPU) is plugged in? That's kinda what this sounds like (CPU wouldn't be powered, so it wouldn't be doing anything, which means that the POST wouldn't progress, which would cause the LCD to stay at 00 and no beeping...)


I have checked both the 4-pin connector and the 24-pin connector and both are plugged in correctly. Still a no go. Motherboard lights up LCD on motherboard reads 00 and no beeps. Thanks for the advice though
January 26, 2011 6:10:49 PM

mdd1963 said:
I would double check all connections, specifically, the cpu aux power connections from PSU to mb, and, the cpu fan (MB to heat sink fan), both of which will require connections before the MB/CPU will work....

(Just because your PSU 'tests good' does not mean it has enough power to drive a full system; you shold be able to fully remove the gpu, and perhaps have the mb beep a code repeatedly that it cant find a video adapter...)


I'm not aware of how to test the PSU but when i took it in to Microcenter they ran some test with a little device and said everything seemed fine. Also it is a 650W PSU so it should be more then enough power for my setup. I've tried booting without the GPU and still no beeps or error number on the Motherboard LCD. I thought it was a defective motherboard the first time this happened but since then it's been replaced and still the same issue. Thanks for you advice though
a b B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
January 26, 2011 6:18:37 PM

youngbreed said:
I'm not aware of how to test the PSU but when i took it in to Microcenter they ran some test with a little device and said everything seemed fine. Also it is a 650W PSU so it should be more then enough power for my setup. I've tried booting without the GPU and still no beeps or error number on the Motherboard LCD. I thought it was a defective motherboard the first time this happened but since then it's been replaced and still the same issue. Thanks for you advice though

I once had a Antec NEOpower 480 PSU that passed the same kind of check, but it turned out that one of it's 12 volt rails was bad, and it didn'tput out enough power on the single good rail to power my PC. Since the PSU checker doesn't put any kind of load on the PSU, all it really tells you is if the PSU is totally dead or not. :pt1cable:  YMMV
January 26, 2011 6:41:29 PM

clarkjd said:
I once had a Antec NEOpower 480 PSU that passed the same kind of check, but it turned out that one of it's 12 volt rails was bad, and it didn'tput out enough power on the single good rail to power my PC. Since the PSU checker doesn't put any kind of load on the PSU, all it really tells you is if the PSU is totally dead or not. :pt1cable:  YMMV


That actually makes a lot of sense. What kind of test did you do to figure out one of the 12 volt rails were bad? And do you think my fans would still spin and the motherboard would light up if this is the case? I would think the motherboard wouldn't light up at all if it didn't have enough power
a b B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
January 26, 2011 6:49:39 PM

youngbreed said:
That actually makes a lot of sense. What kind of test did you do to figure out one of the 12 volt rails were bad? And do you think my fans would still spin and the motherboard would light up if this is the case? I would think the motherboard wouldn't light up at all if it didn't have enough power


I ended up replacing the neopower with a different PSU. I actually RMA'd EVERYTHING(Mobo, Ram, Graphics card, CPU)
in that build before replacing the PSU based on the results of my infallible Power supply tester! :pfff: 

The motherboard doesn't know how much power you will need to power everything(Video card, HDD, ODD, Fans, ETC)
It will just know if you have the correct voltages available. :bounce: 
January 26, 2011 8:05:58 PM

clarkjd said:
I ended up replacing the neopower with a different PSU. I actually RMA'd EVERYTHING(Mobo, Ram, Graphics card, CPU)
in that build before replacing the PSU based on the results of my infallible Power supply tester! :pfff: 

The motherboard doesn't know how much power you will need to power everything(Video card, HDD, ODD, Fans, ETC)
It will just know if you have the correct voltages available. :bounce: 


I wish i had another power supply that i could use to test. Hopefully microcenter has one that i can use. I can RMA my power supply but i bought it from newegg and i would have to wait for them to ship it to me and at this point i would rather not wait any longer then i have to. Thanks for the advice i'm starting to think i have a defective power supply especially since i've replaced the motherboard, GPU, and the CPU
January 27, 2011 3:08:16 PM

clarkjd said:
I ended up replacing the neopower with a different PSU. I actually RMA'd EVERYTHING(Mobo, Ram, Graphics card, CPU)
in that build before replacing the PSU based on the results of my infallible Power supply tester! :pfff: 

The motherboard doesn't know how much power you will need to power everything(Video card, HDD, ODD, Fans, ETC)
It will just know if you have the correct voltages available. :bounce: 


Dude you are the man. I went to microcenter and had them run a test on the motherboard, processor, and ram to see if it would post and it worked. So then i used one of there power supplies and viola the damn thing booted no problem.

So then i exchanged the Antec TruePower supply i had for a new one and the damn thing still wouldn't boot. So for whatever reason the TruePower 650W PSU just doesn't play nice with the DP67BG motherboard. So i picked up a Corsair GS600 PSU and i was in business. I went home set everything up and my PC is as smooth as butter. Thanks for all your help and everyone else who commented on this post. :D  :D  :D  :D  :bounce:  :bounce: 
March 23, 2011 2:43:39 AM

I just went through this exercise with a DP67BG MB, in an antec 100 case and Antec TP-750 PSU.
The PSU was finally swapped for another brand and it fired up just fine.
Like most of us, I had no way to really test the PSU.
I finaly went to NewEgg, and bought a CoolMax PSU tester PS-228 for about $40.00, and afterwards I tested the original TP-750.
Guess what, it had most of the voltages low. outside of the normal range, so I was refered by NewEgg to Antec, due to more than 31 days passing sine I bought it.
Since the TP-750 has a five year warranty, I passed the same information to Antec, and was issued any RMA to return it.
You can bet that I will make a point to test the new TP-750, before it is put into anything, and if good, it will be a standby if one should ever be needed in the future.
Now that I have the PS-228, I also tested several other old PSUs that I had from old computers, and it is the best $40.00 I ever spent, and had I known about it sooner, I would have bought one a long time ago.
The DP67BG is faster than any computer I have ever had before. It scores a 7.8 on Win 7 performance test, and a 1080, and about 42 FPS on the Unigine Heaven DX 11 Video Benchmark test.
Only thing, recently I seem to be losing files and programs, and Win 7 is asking to install up-dates that I know were already intalled?
Not sure whether the Defective Sandy Bridge chip set could be causing the lose of data or not, but I am getting leary of using it until I receive and install the new MB, that is supposed to come sometime in April or later?
March 23, 2011 12:33:03 PM

Old Paul said:

Only thing, recently I seem to be losing files and programs, and Win 7 is asking to install up-dates that I know were already intalled?
Not sure whether the Defective Sandy Bridge chip set could be causing the lose of data or not, but I am getting leary of using it until I receive and install the new MB, that is supposed to come sometime in April or later?


AFAIK all that the SB defect does is degrade the speed of SATA II over time. I'd look at the hard drive as the most likely culprit for lost programs etc ("chkdsk c: /r /f", also try "sfc /scannow". You could also download a program to connect with the S.M.A.R.T. interface of the HDD, and testing the RAM with a program like Memtest86+ could also come in handy). It could also be that you've managed to get a virus already, you might want to run a scan like malwarebytes to check that.
a b B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
March 23, 2011 12:45:52 PM

Old Paul said:
I just went through this exercise with a DP67BG MB, in an antec 100 case and Antec TP-750 PSU.
The PSU was finally swapped for another brand and it fired up just fine.
Like most of us, I had no way to really test the PSU.
I finaly went to NewEgg, and bought a CoolMax PSU tester PS-228 for about $40.00, and afterwards I tested the original TP-750.
Guess what, it had most of the voltages low. outside of the normal range, so I was refered by NewEgg to Antec, due to more than 31 days passing sine I bought it.
Since the TP-750 has a five year warranty, I passed the same information to Antec, and was issued any RMA to return it.
You can bet that I will make a point to test the new TP-750, before it is put into anything, and if good, it will be a standby if one should ever be needed in the future.
Now that I have the PS-228, I also tested several other old PSUs that I had from old computers, and it is the best $40.00 I ever spent, and had I known about it sooner, I would have bought one a long time ago.
The DP67BG is faster than any computer I have ever had before. It scores a 7.8 on Win 7 performance test, and a 1080, and about 42 FPS on the Unigine Heaven DX 11 Video Benchmark test.
Only thing, recently I seem to be losing files and programs, and Win 7 is asking to install up-dates that I know were already intalled?
Not sure whether the Defective Sandy Bridge chip set could be causing the lose of data or not, but I am getting leary of using it until I receive and install the new MB, that is supposed to come sometime in April or later?

The problem with these kind of PSU testers is they only check for the presence or absence of voltages, they can't check for available Amps(I.e. under a load). That is what worked against me with my Neopower 480 PSU. since it had one good +12volt rail, it showed that the +12v was good, even though it wasn't able to put out full amperage on the +12v circuit. :pfff: 
March 23, 2011 1:14:43 PM

killersquirel11 said:
AFAIK all that the SB defect does is degrade the speed of SATA II over time. I'd look at the hard drive as the most likely culprit for lost programs etc ("chkdsk c: /r /f", also try "sfc /scannow". You could also download a program to connect with the S.M.A.R.T. interface of the HDD, and testing the RAM with a program like Memtest86+ could also come in handy). It could also be that you've managed to get a virus already, you might want to run a scan like malwarebytes to check that.


Thanks, I'll check that out, though will probably use SpinRite 6.x, which I've burned onto a CD. The HD is a WD 1 TB, partitioned into two .5 TB drives.
March 23, 2011 1:20:27 PM

clarkjd said:
The problem with these kind of PSU testers is they only check for the presence or absence of voltages, they can't check for available Amps(I.e. under a load). That is what worked against me with my Neopower 480 PSU. since it had one good +12volt rail, it showed that the +12v was good, even though it wasn't able to put out full amperage on the +12v circuit. :pfff: 



Haven't used this testor long enough to know for sure what it will do, but will keep that in mind.
At least now I can tell whether there is or isn't a voltage output from each connector, and if it is high or low, compared to what that voltage output is supposed to be.
That is a start and more than I knew before.
Thanks for the heads up, will keep that in mid too.
March 23, 2011 2:33:40 PM

Old Paul said:
Haven't used this testor long enough to know for sure what it will do, but will keep that in mind.
At least now I can tell whether there is or isn't a voltage output from each connector, and if it is high or low, compared to what that voltage output is supposed to be.
That is a start and more than I knew before.
Thanks for the heads up, will keep that in mid too.


You can also use a software-based hardware monitor, like speedfan or Intel Desktop Utilities which will allow you to monitor the voltages under load, although granted they rely on the hardware on the motherboard being accurate.

Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer using a good ol' multimeter rather than any fancy schmancy PSU tester where you have to rely on the person who engineered the thing being smart enough to do it right.
a b B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
March 23, 2011 2:47:21 PM

killersquirel11 said:
You can also use a software-based hardware monitor, like speedfan or Intel Desktop Utilities which will allow you to monitor the voltages under load, although granted they rely on the hardware on the motherboard being accurate.

Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer using a good ol' multimeter rather than any fancy schmancy PSU tester where you have to rely on the person who engineered the thing being smart enough to do it right.


Even the "good ol' multimeter" has the same problem as the PSU testers in that it can't put the PSU under a load. Just because the PSU shows as having all the required voltages doesn't mean that it can supply enough current to actually power the PC. :bounce: 
March 23, 2011 3:27:59 PM

Thanks, I do use the Intel Desktop Utilities (V. 3.xx), but they seem to work on some of my systems, but not on others?

I'm old fashioned too, but this tester is very handy, and shows all the PSU voltages at once, and wherther they are high (HH) or low (LL), and presents them for easy review.

So, guess even this old dog can learn a new trick or two.
March 24, 2011 12:57:36 PM

clarkjd said:
Even the "good ol' multimeter" has the same problem as the PSU testers in that it can't put the PSU under a load. Just because the PSU shows as having all the required voltages doesn't mean that it can supply enough current to actually power the PC. :bounce: 


If you are determined enough, you can test the PSU under load with a multimeter...
March 24, 2011 2:58:38 PM

killersquirel11 said:
AFAIK all that the SB defect does is degrade the speed of SATA II over time. I'd look at the hard drive as the most likely culprit for lost programs etc ("chkdsk c: /r /f", also try "sfc /scannow". You could also download a program to connect with the S.M.A.R.T. interface of the HDD, and testing the RAM with a program like Memtest86+ could also come in handy). It could also be that you've managed to get a virus already, you might want to run a scan like malwarebytes to check that.



I ran Spin-Rite 6.x on the boot partition of the hard drive, and there were no problems, so guress I'll have to look elsewhere.
a b B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
March 24, 2011 3:00:58 PM

killersquirel11 said:
If you are determined enough, you can test the PSU under load with a multimeter...


"determined" would be putting it lightly :D 

Yep, if you are willing to do some what I would call invasive testing(wiring the ammeter into the circuit), you could use the AMPS function of the multimeter to see how may amps are being pulled thru a particular wire..Not something that you would do for just a quick check. :sol: 
March 24, 2011 3:09:58 PM

When I was in the Navy, about 56 years ago, I used to service our Radar units, and I can attest to having "tested" high voltages then I accidently touched something I shouldn't have, and got quite a jolt when the load transfered to the case through my hand and forearm.
Not something that I would reccommend as way to find out what the load carrying ability of a devise is?
Think I'll stick to the tester that I'm using now.
March 24, 2011 4:56:43 PM

clarkjd said:
"determined" would be putting it lightly :D 

Yep, if you are willing to do some what I would call invasive testing(wiring the ammeter into the circuit), you could use the AMPS function of the multimeter to see how may amps are being pulled thru a particular wire..Not something that you would do for just a quick check. :sol: 


Well you never really need to see the amps, just the volts under load. To get that you can generally just insert the probes of the multimeter into the back of the plug while it's plugged into the board and running. As long as you don't touch the probes together while testing the voltages, the motherboard should be safe

And if you really wanted to hack something into the wire, the easiest way to go would be to A) get a sacrificial power supply
B) get a 24 pin extender
C) attach the 24 pin connector from A to the wires from B
D) hook up the PSU tester to A
E) Profit
May 25, 2011 5:48:46 PM

Old Paul said:
I just went through this exercise with a DP67BG MB, in an antec 100 case and Antec TP-750 PSU.
The PSU was finally swapped for another brand and it fired up just fine.
Like most of us, I had no way to really test the PSU.
I finaly went to NewEgg, and bought a CoolMax PSU tester PS-228 for about $40.00, and afterwards I tested the original TP-750.
Guess what, it had most of the voltages low. outside of the normal range, so I was refered by NewEgg to Antec, due to more than 31 days passing sine I bought it.
Since the TP-750 has a five year warranty, I passed the same information to Antec, and was issued any RMA to return it.
You can bet that I will make a point to test the new TP-750, before it is put into anything, and if good, it will be a standby if one should ever be needed in the future.
Now that I have the PS-228, I also tested several other old PSUs that I had from old computers, and it is the best $40.00 I ever spent, and had I known about it sooner, I would have bought one a long time ago.
The DP67BG is faster than any computer I have ever had before. It scores a 7.8 on Win 7 performance test, and a 1080, and about 42 FPS on the Unigine Heaven DX 11 Video Benchmark test.
Only thing, recently I seem to be losing files and programs, and Win 7 is asking to install up-dates that I know were already intalled?
Not sure whether the Defective Sandy Bridge chip set could be causing the lose of data or not, but I am getting leary of using it until I receive and install the new MB, that is supposed to come sometime in April or later?



So you are happy overall with the Intel DP67BG after getting this PSU issue worked out?

I'M really considering going with this Mobo for my new build. Any other flaws or issues so far?

Ive read a bunch of reviews on the Intel DP67BG against other P67 or Z67 boards like Asus Pro, Gigabyte and such and it had some of the best transfer rates, stability, and lowest power usage. Sure it doesnt have the flashy overkill features and hype but I want this thing to go fast and last for years worry free:) 
!