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AMD Bulldozer

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  • Bulldozer
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April 26, 2011 5:21:18 AM

Im thinking about building a new gaming rig in a months time. Is it worth waiting till June for the new amd processor or should i just go for the sandy bridge i5 2500k. What is the price expected for the amd bulldozers?

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April 26, 2011 5:26:38 AM

You will not be disappointed with a 2500k. It is a great CPU. Although, if you can wait, I would. The new BD should compete with SB and be about the same price, just cheaper motherboards. If I were you I would wait. The price is expected to be about the same as the SB. Same price for the 8-core AMD as the i7, 6-core and 15, and 4-core and i3.
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April 26, 2011 5:29:33 AM

i would wait if the 6 core one is priced about same as the i5. and perform same too. :) 
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April 26, 2011 12:03:42 PM

I get bored when someone post about bulldozer then have nothing to say about it..
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April 26, 2011 12:26:04 PM

I to was hoping for more info on bulldozer but anyway is it worth waiting? You will only find out when its released, so i,d say its worth waiting if you can but as already stated you will not be unhappy if you get a 2500K (unless bulldozer is half the price which is unlikely) also if you wait the new Sandy bridge chipset should be around about the same time ish. So that could be worth the wait anyway.
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April 26, 2011 12:59:35 PM

If it was my decision (or if I could change my decision) I would wait for AMD's bulldozer.

I purchased my i7 2600 and even though I'm extremely happy with it, I feel like I made a bit of a mistake by not waiting.
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April 26, 2011 1:51:00 PM

ghnader hsmithot said:
I get bored when someone post about bulldozer then have nothing to say about it..


Just for you ... :lol: 




And I suspect there is a significant level of manufacturer/tester/propagandist **spec-obs** here (specification obfuscation) to go too crazy about ...



but I suppose you may draw the conclusion that AMD Turbo2 might kick things up a notch. Won't mean much if you plan to disable T-2 and power-gating while OC'ing the snot out of a chip, but sets some interesting potential 'ranges' gained from powering down modules

but all this pretty much follows AND SOP in easing tech into the mainstream in a prior gen (making 'guinea-pig' beta-testers out of customers :lol:  ) before refining and moving it to the next gen.





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April 26, 2011 2:02:10 PM

Wisecracker said:
Just for you ... :lol: 

http://i716.photobucket.com/albums/ww165/Back_at_the_Ranch/AMD%20Overlords/Spec/asr.jpg


And I suspect there is a significant level of manufacturer/tester/propagandist **spec-obs** here (specification obfuscation) to go too crazy about ...

http://i716.photobucket.com/albums/ww165/Back_at_the_Ranch/AMD%20Overlords/Spec/2j5nbc.jpg

but I suppose you may draw the conclusion that AMD Turbo2 might kick things up a notch. Won't mean much if you plan to disable T-2 and power-gating while OC'ing the snot out of a chip, but sets some interesting potential 'ranges' gained from powering down modules

but all this pretty much follows AND SOP in easing tech into the mainstream in a prior gen (making 'guinea-pig' beta-testers out of customers :lol:  ) before refining and moving it to the next gen.

romantic arent we?
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April 26, 2011 4:20:28 PM

Wisecracker said:
Just for you ... :lol: 

http://i716.photobucket.com/albums/ww165/Back_at_the_Ranch/AMD%20Overlords/Spec/asr.jpg


And I suspect there is a significant level of manufacturer/tester/propagandist **spec-obs** here (specification obfuscation) to go too crazy about ...

http://i716.photobucket.com/albums/ww165/Back_at_the_Ranch/AMD%20Overlords/Spec/2j5nbc.jpg

but I suppose you may draw the conclusion that AMD Turbo2 might kick things up a notch. Won't mean much if you plan to disable T-2 and power-gating while OC'ing the snot out of a chip, but sets some interesting potential 'ranges' gained from powering down modules

but all this pretty much follows AND SOP in easing tech into the mainstream in a prior gen (making 'guinea-pig' beta-testers out of customers :lol:  ) before refining and moving it to the next gen.

I don't get the first graph, what does it mean?
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April 26, 2011 4:43:43 PM

Hard to say.

Intel has provided graphs which look like the "AM3+" graph on the left for years in its electrical loadline specs. Basically, it illustrates the expected actual voltage level specs (typ=typical, min, and max) provided at the chip at various draw currents (which are roughly correlated to speed, but can vary with the transistor properties in any given die) compared to the voltage (VDD_VID) the chip self-reports as its nominal voltage during boot.

If I read it correctly, it implies the older AM3 package specs (graph on the right) were a very narrow band with an invariant voltage delivery spec across all current draws, and that the AM3+ devices adopt a new spec method.

Which seems weird to me... current-variant loadlines are not a new concept-- they go back at least as far as the Pentium 3 (as far back as I can find Intel specs for, in other words), and possibly farther. I'm having a hard time believing this is new to Bulldozer.


EDIT: Well, whether it "seems weird to me" or not, it does appear from at least the (publicly available) Phenom II spec sheet that there have been no voltage variances based on current on AM3 sockets thus far. It's possible there have been some shared privately with socket, motherboard, and VRM vendors, but as it is... wild! Hard to believe this could be their first time doing this, but looks real.
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April 26, 2011 4:53:16 PM

Nobody can answer your question. If your ready to buy now, buy. If you want to wait, wait.

Another speculation thread :sarcastic: 
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April 26, 2011 4:53:42 PM

archibael said:
Hard to say.

Intel has provided graphs which look like the "AM3+" graph on the left for years in its electrical loadline specs. Basically, it illustrates the expected actual voltage level specs (typ=typical, min, and max) provided at the chip at various draw currents (which are roughly correlated to speed, but can vary with the transistor properties in any given die) compared to the voltage (VDD_VID) the chip self-reports as its nominal voltage during boot.

If I read it correctly, it implies the older AM3 package specs (graph on the right) were a very narrow band with an invariant voltage delivery spec across all current draws, and that the AM3+ devices adopt a new spec method.

Which seems weird to me... current-variant loadlines are not a new concept-- they go back at least as far as the Pentium 3 (as far back as I can find Intel specs for, in other words), and possibly farther. I'm having a hard time believing this is new to Bulldozer.

Okay, thank you.
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April 26, 2011 4:54:39 PM

geekapproved said:
Nobody can answer your question. If your ready to buy now, buy. If you want to wait, wait.

Another speculation thread :sarcastic: 

Yes. Although, with the speculation that I have seen, you should wait for Bulldozer.
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April 26, 2011 5:14:17 PM

Why sit around and wait for an unproven technology that may or may not (probably not) be as good as what is already out and is a proven winner (sandy bridge)???
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April 26, 2011 5:17:44 PM

majin ssj eric said:
Why sit around and wait for an unproven technology that may or may not (probably not) be as good as what is already out and is a proven winner (sandy bridge)???

"Proven winner"?! Just because you have a 2600k and like it doesn't mean SB is best. BD haven't been released, so you DON'T know. BD is looking pretty impressive, and is supposed to perform like SB with more cores. I would wait for BD and see what it has to offer. it may be better, it may not be. Who knows?
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April 26, 2011 5:25:20 PM

Personally, amd as of recently has seemed to be a better value for gaming. But has come up lacking in the other areas.

Im not expecting to be wow'd by bulldozer like so many others, too many past dissapointments.

But if this machine is mostly for gaming, id also say wait for bulldozer. it may be a better value in atleast the gaming category
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April 26, 2011 5:31:27 PM

oxxfatelostxxo said:
Personally, amd as of recently has seemed to be a better value for gaming. But has come up lacking in the other areas.

Im not expecting to be wow'd by bulldozer like so many others, too many past dissapointments.

But if this machine is mostly for gaming, id also say wait for bulldozer. it may be a better value in atleast the gaming category

Yes, I am on the same page as you. I run an AMD Athlon II X3 440 @ 3.3Ghz and it runs games fine, and that is a $80 chip. I don't think AMD BD WILL be better that SB, but I think it will be close or the same. Both 32nm techs, each offer different amounts of cores for different tasks, and for gaming, a quad will run everything really well. Call me a fan boy, but I don't really see much reason for buying an Intel chip.
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April 26, 2011 5:41:21 PM

taran95 said:
Im thinking about building a new gaming rig in a months time. Is it worth waiting till June for the new amd processor or should i just go for the sandy bridge i5 2500k. What is the price expected for the amd bulldozers?



The one thing about SB is that it has a pretty much useless GPU for real gaming so you have to buy a GPU anyway. And though certain benchmarks show it well ahead of Phenom II X6, gaming at HD is neck and neck. Price out both systems and see which one is cheaper. The differences will only be the CPU and mobo.

I'm personally waiting for Zambezi.


From BSN
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April 26, 2011 6:22:00 PM

No one is going to be using an integrated GPU for serious gaming; its a non-argument.
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