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Am i able to sli gtx 560's on this mobo?

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December 31, 2011 6:59:04 PM

its an AMD so....

Motherboard: [CrossFireX] GigaByte GA-970A-D3 AMD 970 Socket AM3+ ATX Mainboard w/ On/Off Charge, 7.1 Audio, GbLAN, USB3.0, SATA-III RAID, 2 Gen2 PCIe X16, 3 PCIe X1 & 2 PCI

also my cpu is the fx-8120 @3.1 ghz

to do this, what do i need? i presume i will need a new power supply/ cooling? please help i have a limited time before i have to make my decision....

More about : sli gtx 560 mobo

December 31, 2011 8:17:22 PM

You could but not very well. The second PCIe slot is only x4 instead of x16. The x4 will bottleneck a 560, how much, I'm not completely sure. Someone more knowledgeable would be able to tell you. It is recommended to have at least PCIe x8 slots for a modern graphics card.

I'm assuming this is a prebuilt computer here. You will most likely need to upgrade the power supply, and it would be recommended to add a case fan or two to help with cooling.

Edit: If found a link to an article showing a GTX 480 (more powerful than a 560) using x4, x8, and x16 slots. The bottleneck might be not too bad. Wait for confirmation before jumping on it though.

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GTX_480_PCI-E...
December 31, 2011 9:32:56 PM

what does all this x4 x8 and x16 slots mean? and what is bottlenecking? i am new to all this, no need to be rude though, everyone had to learn sometime right?
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January 1, 2012 12:38:30 AM

Ok here we go.

A PCIe 2.0 (or Gen2) slot is where your graphics card will plug into. x4, x8, and x16 all have the same physical dimensions. What the x4 and x16 represent in PCIe slots is the number of lanes that data can pass through. Therefore the more lanes the more data can be transferred per second. Lets say a GTX 560 when running full out uses as much data as 9 lanes (just made up that amount). If it is in a x4 (4 lane) slot it can only work at about 44% efficiency.

Bottlenecking is when a component is held back from working at 100% by some other component. In this case it is the graphics card being bottlenecked by the number of lanes in the PCIe slot.

Note that your motherboard has one x16 slot, meaning any of the current graphics cards will run just fine with no bottleneck due to the number of lanes.
January 1, 2012 1:50:00 AM

you, my friend, are most helpful. would it be smarter to just buy one gpu that is better than the 560 then? or would a more powerful gpu be "bottlenecked"?
January 1, 2012 2:21:55 AM

A more powerful GPU would not be bottlenecked since you have one PCIe x16 slot. If you are looking in the same price range the GTX 570 or a HD 6970 are around $350. If your monitor has a resolution of 1680x1020 or less you could probably run almost all games on ultra with a GTX 560TI or HD 6950 (1 GB video ram is all you need for these two). This gets you down to the $200-$250 range.

Edit: Also the HD 7000 series will start coming out within a month. The 7970 actually came out on the 22nd of December. If you are not in a hurry, I would look around to see if you can find it for around the same price as the HD 6970, or wait for a price drop on a 6970. You could also wait around for the 7950 if you would like, when it comes out I am not quite sure.
a c 195 V Motherboard
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January 1, 2012 2:52:14 AM

The "x" number represents the number of PCI lanes.....x8 x8 (8 lanes for each of the 2 card) is generally considered the minimum for today's GFX cards......x16 x16 offers marginal improvement ..... x4 not good.

You can however use this....two 560's on one PCB will work on ya x16 slot

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It will be about 35% faster than a single 580
a c 206 V Motherboard
a b À AMD
January 1, 2012 3:46:38 AM

Any motherboard that supports NVIDIA's SLI technology will include an SLI bridge connector in the motherboard package.

The GA-970A-D3 doesn't support NVIDIA SLI technology so that's why there is no SLI bridge connector included with your motherboard.

You can use a single NVIDIA graphics card that has dual-GPUs.
January 1, 2012 1:02:36 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
The "x" number represents the number of PCI lanes.....x8 x8 (8 lanes for each of the 2 card) is generally considered the minimum for today's GFX cards......x16 x16 offers marginal improvement ..... x4 not good.

You can however use this....two 560's on one PCB will work on ya x16 slot

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It will be about 35% faster than a single 580


so what exactly is two 560's on one PCB? and i just wanna ask where the 35% comes from, is there like some way to calculate it? and would the "two 560's on one PCB (? lol) be bottlenecked?

like i said im very new to all this, but thank you.
January 1, 2012 1:03:39 PM

ko888 said:
Any motherboard that supports NVIDIA's SLI technology will include an SLI bridge connector in the motherboard package.

The GA-970A-D3 doesn't support NVIDIA SLI technology so that's why there is no SLI bridge connector included with your motherboard.

You can use a single NVIDIA graphics card that has dual-GPUs.

is that what JackNaylorPE suggested?
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January 1, 2012 5:17:06 PM

llllllllllll said:
is that what JackNaylorPE suggested?

Yes the EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 2Win is an example of such a card. It's not an NVIDIA designed card.

There is also the NVIDIA designed GeForce GTX 590.
January 1, 2012 5:31:52 PM

ko888 said:
Yes the EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 2Win is an example of such a card. It's not an NVIDIA designed card.

There is also the NVIDIA designed GeForce GTX 590.


is it bad that its not nvidia designed?
a c 206 V Motherboard
a b À AMD
January 1, 2012 5:37:32 PM

llllllllllll said:
is it bad that its not nvidia designed?

No. It just means that there is only a single source for that model (i.e. EVGA).

An NVIDIA designed card is available through more than one card manufacturer.
January 1, 2012 5:46:40 PM

ko888 said:
No. It just means that there is only a single source for that model (i.e. EVGA).

An NVIDIA designed card is available through more than one card manufacturer.


oh i see, so do you think that if i were to get the two 560 ti's on one "PCB" (?) it would run well on my computer? I have the fx 8120 @ 3.1 GHz, i know its not the best for games. i was looking to be able to max most games, especially skyrim.

and power supply/ cooling... what would be needed for that card?
i have 600W now,
and Asetek 510LC Liquid Cooling System 120MM Radiator & Fan (Enhanced Cooling Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA)
with an extra 120mm case fan
a c 206 V Motherboard
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January 1, 2012 7:22:23 PM

llllllllllll said:
oh i see, so do you think that if i were to get the two 560 ti's on one "PCB" (?) it would run well on my computer? I have the fx 8120 @ 3.1 GHz, i know its not the best for games. i was looking to be able to max most games, especially skyrim.

and power supply/ cooling... what would be needed for that card?
i have 600W now,
and Asetek 510LC Liquid Cooling System 120MM Radiator & Fan (Enhanced Cooling Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA)
with an extra 120mm case fan

Skyrim is much more CPU-bound than GPU-bound.

The EVGA 02G-P3-1569-KR GeForce GTX 560 Ti 2Win (dual GPU) is a very long card, it's 11.5 inches (i.e. 29.2cm) in length. If your computer case can handle graphics cards of that length then you shouldn't have any problem installing it.

For a system using a single EVGA 02G-P3-1569-KR GeForce GTX 560 Ti 2Win graphics card EVGA specifies a minimum of a 700 Watt or greater power supply that has a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 50 Amps or greater and that has at least two 8-pin PCI Express power connectors or four available 6-pin PCI Express power connectors.
a c 206 V Motherboard
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January 1, 2012 10:34:47 PM

llllllllllll said:
how's this? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

and if i was looking to max skyrim would i have to overclock my cpu? also i still dont really understand the concept of bottlenecking... is it a lack of cpu power to handle the gpu? im so confused.

A CPU-bound application/game is one that would benefit from an increase in CPU processing power because the CPU is limiting the system's performance. Overclocking the CPU or replacing it with a more powerful one will result in a performance boost (i.e. increase in frame rate (FPS)) but increasing the graphics processing power doesn't have any benefit or very little benefit.

A GPU-bound application/game is one that would benefit from an increase in GPU processing power because the GPU is limiting the system's performance. This just means that a more powerful graphics card gives a boost in performance but increasing the CPU processing power won't.
January 1, 2012 11:07:17 PM

that makes sense, thanks, do you know any sites that provide guides to overclocking for beginners so i dont screw something up?
!