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12Tb NAS Server

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April 26, 2011 6:25:56 PM

Building a rack mount NAS Server. Here are the specs:

CPU: AMD Anthlon x2 3.0Ghz Regor - $60.99
MOBO: ASRock A770DE ATX - $53.99
RAM: 2Gb G Skill DDR3 1333 - $19
CASE: NORCO RPC-250 Black 2U - $77
PSU: OCZ ModXStream Pro OCZ500MXSP 500W 80 Plus rated - $64.99
HDDs: 6x WD Caviar Green WD20EARS 2TB - $479

NAS Total - $277
Total - $757

I'm going to run Ubuntu 11.04 with XBMC for media content push and MythTV for DVR capturing over HD Homerun Network box.

What I'm storing:

1 HD movies/tv library - 5Tb
2 Music library - 1Tb
3 Data backup from workstation* - 6Tb hot swappable
A - Project Files
B - Encoded Video files
C - Raw HD video files
D - Raw audio files
E - Music (self created)
Ubuntu - 25Gb partition.

Ok questions:
Is there a cheaper, reliable brand, PSU that can take up to 6x SATA HDDs? It needs to be 80 Plus cert. This NAS will be on 24/7/365 and it's important to me it's a green computer.
What RAID config should I use for my backing up files (Number 3 in my list)? I want to have these hot swap drives, because when they fill up, I plan on storing the drives and replacing with fresh drives.
What RAID config should I use for my HD Videos and Music (Number 1-2 in my list)? I would like to pool these together and I don't plan on backing them up.
*What is the best method for backing up my workstation? I plan on running a backup utility daily at 3AM to back up only my Project data for my video and audio editing, which is on a 600Gb pool. I won't be making any duplicates of files, just updating changes of backups and new created files. Should I run this utility to an USB 3.0 External HDD and dump it to my NAS when it fills up or should I run the utility over my 10/1000 network to the NAS directly?

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April 27, 2011 5:41:33 PM

saint19 said:
PSUs:

1- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
2- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'd go with RAID 5 for 1 ,2 and 3, but if you can't, then RADI 5 in 3 and RAID 1 in 1 and 2.

Regarding the backup, why not both?


Good call on RAID 5 for 3. RAID 5 will pool all the data correct?
Does RAID 1 pool all the data together or does it eliminate 1 drive's space? If it pools it, (2x 2Tb=4Tb pool) I will def go with RAID 1 for 1 and 2.

As for backing up, I don't need my data to be in 3 locations, just 2 (computer and NAS drive). What I was asking was which method is faster: backing up to external drive and dumping it to the NAS or just backing up over my LAN to the NAS?
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April 27, 2011 6:31:41 PM

captvash said:
Good call on RAID 5 for 3. RAID 5 will pool all the data correct?
Does RAID 1 pool all the data together or does it eliminate 1 drive's space? If it pools it, (2x 2Tb=4Tb pool) I will def go with RAID 1 for 1 and 2.

As for backing up, I don't need my data to be in 3 locations, just 2 (computer and NAS drive). What I was asking was which method is faster: backing up to external drive and dumping it to the NAS or just backing up over my LAN to the NAS?


The total size of RAID 5 depends of the number of disk that you want use and the size of it.

For RAID 1, if you have two drives you only see one since it's a mirror in the 2nd drive, so, 2x2TB = 2TB RAID 1.

How fast is your LAN?
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April 27, 2011 7:59:41 PM

saint19 said:
The total size of RAID 5 depends of the number of disk that you want use and the size of it.

For RAID 1, if you have two drives you only see one since it's a mirror in the 2nd drive, so, 2x2TB = 2TB RAID 1.

How fast is your LAN?


Then I'll prob do RAID 0 for 1-2. Since I dont really care if i have data loss there.

Does RAID 5 have any mirroring? If not, I def wanna pursue that.

My LAN is 10/1000
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April 27, 2011 8:07:47 PM

Just to clarify...you do realize that if one of the disks falls out of RAID 0, you cannot access that array until you rebuild it - what were you going to put on those disks? Is there any reason you'd need the performance of RAID 0?
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April 27, 2011 8:13:57 PM

captvash said:
Then I'll prob do RAID 0 for 1-2. Since I dont really care if i have data loss there.

Does RAID 5 have any mirroring? If not, I def wanna pursue that.

My LAN is 10/1000


Not exactly mirroring, RAID 5 works with parity that's the data distribution in all the disk members of the RAID array. In this case, if you have a faulty drive you can replace it and re-build the array with zero data loss.

The backup can be do it over LAN.
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April 28, 2011 1:52:04 PM

I was just reading the initial thread again...

You want to have part of it sectioned off to back up data, correct? Then you want to be able to swap out these drives to store them, right?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but if the backup section is done in a RAID 5 config, you can't hot swap just one drive and have a way to retain that data, right? I'd think you'd have to have it said up in a different fashion to make that work.
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April 28, 2011 3:17:18 PM

huron said:
Just to clarify...you do realize that if one of the disks falls out of RAID 0, you cannot access that array until you rebuild it - what were you going to put on those disks? Is there any reason you'd need the performance of RAID 0?


Good point Huron. I think I'll just keep those drives separated. 1 drive for movies, and 1 drive for music/tv/and ubuntu.

I do want 3 drives to be separated for RAID5 which will only be for backing up. Are you saying that the data is stored randomly over those 3 drives and I wouldn't be able to remove a drive and have all the information together?
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April 28, 2011 6:16:00 PM

The way that RAID 5 works in your config (3 disks) is it will write data to disk1, disk2, then parity information to disk3. The next write will go to disk2, disk3, and parity to disk1. The next write would go disk3, disk1, and parity to disk2. Etc, etc, etc.

That's my basic understanding...so you couldn't pull a disk out and have the "backup" You could lose a disk and rebuild it, based on the parity information contained in the other disks.

You could still have a RAID volume set up for backup, then export it to a single hotswap disk that isn't a part of the RAID. You could rotate those hotswap volumes monthly, etc (hopefully keeping one off-site or in something fire-proof/water-proof).

Just an idea.
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