Intel Core i7 2920XM Extreme

I just bought an Asus Laptop with Intel Core i7 2920XM Extreme Series Processor. I just received it yesterday. I installed CPU-Z to recognize the processor, but I received that information from CPU-Z (Intel Core i7 2920XM Extreme (ES) after I started it.

The processor model and the step information like the below.

Family 6
Model A
Step 6
Revision D1

Is it the Engineering Sample or OEM / Retail?

What is the differences between them because Windows 7 rates this processor with 7.4 from 7.9 even it is the fastest processor of the market. Can you give me some idea about that processor? Should I return that laptop for the processor replacement? Thanks
40 answers Last reply
More about intel core 2920xm extreme
  1. Its far from the fastest processor on the market, the i7 990X and its Xeon counterparts hold that title, and WEI is far from a good way of judging system performance, its scores change as newer faster parts come out so its not a solid benchmark score.

    Your laptop will NOT contain an engineering sample CPU, those are in limited supply and are preproduction units that may not perform exactly like the retail units so they are never put in regular machines, your laptop will have an OEM version in it.
  2. Time to get on the phone with whomever you bought it from for some answers. If in fact they did install a ES chip in your laptop by mistake I would return it. I don't think Intel would even warranty that chip and there is no telling how hard that cpu has been hammered in testing!
    As far as the WEI rating of 7.4 I don't know what to make of that! You'd think it would rate 7.9 but oh well.
    They should pay shipping both ways too!
  3. 7.4 WEI is incredibly good for a laptop CPU. Remember, there is a sizable difference between best laptop CPU on the market, and best desktop one. Since my i7 2600K desktop chip gets a 7.6 at stock, I'd say your ranking is pretty dead on, high even

    Btw, not even any desktop chip scores a 7.9 (at least on stock speeds)
  4. hunter315 said:
    Its far from the fastest processor on the market, the i7 990X and its Xeon counterparts hold that title, and WEI is far from a good way of judging system performance, its scores change as newer faster parts come out so its not a solid benchmark score.

    Your laptop will NOT contain an engineering sample CPU, those are in limited supply and are preproduction units that may not perform exactly like the retail units so they are never put in regular machines, your laptop will have an OEM version in it.



    CPU-Z says it is (ES) I would wish that they could not have installed an (ES) chip, but CPU-Z says it is ES.

    Do you have any idea about the below steps and info of processor

    The processor model and the step information like the below.

    Family 6
    Model A
    Step 6
    Revision D1

    How many percent performance difference can have between (ES) and OEM / RETAIL processor?
  5. bearclaw99 said:
    7.4 WEI is incredibly good for a laptop CPU. Remember, there is a sizable difference between best laptop CPU on the market, and best desktop one. Since my i7 2600K desktop chip gets a 7.6 at stock, I'd say your ranking is pretty dead on, high even

    Btw, not even any desktop chip scores a 7.9 (at least on stock speeds)



    wrong wrong wrong!!!
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-2920xm-core-i7-980x-sandy-bridge,2851-4.html
    read and restate previous post because it is not a sizable difference. the 2920xm beats the 980x in gaming and and very competitive in other areas and beating the 980x in single threaded programs.

    also my 2630qm scores a 7.4
  6. I also realized another strange thing on the intel's web site. It says on their web site 2920XM Extreme processor supports up to 8GB memory, but my laptop has 16GB
  7. CBrunnem, beating the 980X in single core apps is absolutely meaningless. So does my i7 2600K, but WEI does not measure single core speed, it measures speed across all available threads. Even the higher end Core i3s will beat a 980x on single core

    The i5 2500K desktop CPU gets about a 7.5 on WEI. The 2920XM, while an excellent processor, is not as good as the i5 2500K all around

    Either way, WEI is a crappy benchmark anyways, and less reliable than many others. Download CPUZ and check the specifics of the CPU, see if it says ES. Run some valid benchmarks on it like Cinebench 11.5, SiSandra, or 3DMark
  8. Do you guys have any idea about the below steps and info of processor

    The processor model and the step information like the below.

    Family 6
    Model A
    Step 6
    Revision D1

    How many percent performance difference can have between (ES) and OEM / RETAIL processor?
  9. It's pretty much definitely not an ES, so I wouldn't worry about it.
  10. It should be ES because if it were not CPU-Z would not say it as ES
  11. Its a Sandy Bridge extreme version.When are the desktop counter parts actually going to come out would be interesting.
  12. Tomshardware has a test at the below link for that processor versus to i7 980x

    They used 1.56 version of CPU-Z. It says the below information for the processor.

    Intel Core i7 2920XM CPU @ 2.50 (does not have any info as ES like mine has)
    Model A Step 7
    Revision D2

    Which is the above model of my processor (it looks like)
  13. hmetin said:
    It should be ES because if it were not CPU-Z would not say it as ES


    If someone knocked on your door and told you to run because aliens were coming, would you grab your stuff and run or assume they are crazy?

    Dumb analogy, but the point behind it is to look at the situation logically. It's much much much (I could keep going) more likely that CPU-Z is reporting incorrectly than it is that you got an engineering sample CPU. Don't worry about it, and if you must, try a few different programs to check what it's telling you.
  14. Yargnit said:
    If someone knocked on your door and told you to run because aliens were coming, would you grab your stuff and run or assume they are crazy?

    Dumb analogy, but the point behind it is to look at the situation logically. It's much much much (I could keep going) more likely that CPU-Z is reporting incorrectly than it is that you got an engineering sample CPU. Don't worry about it, and if you must, try a few different programs to check what it's telling you.



    I have used another program to watch its temperature, but it shows it is ES series too. the tool version is CORE TEMP 0.99.8
  15. bearclaw99 said:
    CBrunnem, beating the 980X in single core apps is absolutely meaningless. So does my i7 2600K, but WEI does not measure single core speed, it measures speed across all available threads. Even the higher end Core i3s will beat a 980x on single core

    The i5 2500K desktop CPU gets about a 7.5 on WEI. The 2920XM, while an excellent processor, is not as good as the i5 2500K all around

    Either way, WEI is a crappy benchmark anyways, and less reliable than many others. Download CPUZ and check the specifics of the CPU, see if it says ES. Run some valid benchmarks on it like Cinebench 11.5, SiSandra, or 3DMark


    how is beating the 980x in half the games meaningless? thats damn impressive for a laptop cpu.
  16. cbrunnem said:
    how is beating the 980x in half the games meaningless? thats damn impressive for a laptop cpu.



    It beats like this, 980x series has 6x2=12 cores. This processor still has 4x8 cores. If you look at the all test results on tomshardware


    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-2920xm-core-i7-980x-sandy-bridge,2851-10.html

    you can look at the above results.
  17. hmetin said:
    It beats like this, 980x series has 6x2=12 cores. This processor still has 4x8 cores. If you look at the all test results on tomshardware


    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-2920xm-core-i7-980x-sandy-bridge,2851-10.html

    you can look at the above results.


    not quite sure what you point is but the 2920xm is a competitive gaming cpu to any cpu out there. it might not be the most cost effective but it is still very strong and i dont care how it does it because facts are facts.
  18. cbrunnem said:
    not quite sure what you point is but the 2920xm is a competitive gaming cpu to any cpu out there. it might not be the most cost effective but it is still very strong and i dont care how it does it because facts are facts.



    Also I did not open that topic to discuss the performance difference between 980x ans 2920xm. I opened it to learn differences between 2920XM (OEM / TRAY / RETAIL) and Engineering Sample (ES)

    Also confirm if my processor is ES or NOT
  19. 1) Your CPU is not ES
    2) It's slower than a number of desktop CPUs, including the i7-990x, i7-2600k, and i5-2500k. The fact that at stock clocks, it beats the 990x on a few single threaded cases doesn't really matter.
  20. cjl said:
    1) Your CPU is not ES
    2) It's slower than a number of desktop CPUs, including the i7-990x, i7-2600k, and i5-2500k. The fact that at stock clocks, it beats the 990x on a few single threaded cases doesn't really matter.

    +100000000000000000000
  21. ghnader hsmithot said:
    +100000000000000000000



    dont believe crysis is a single threaded game and it beats the 980x by 3 fps.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-2920xm-core-i7-980x-sandy-bridge,2851-8.html

    dont get me wrong i am not saying the the 2920xm is the superior cpu it just derserves much more credit then anyone is giving it.
  22. Its a great cpu however we are talking about an extreme version of Sandy Bridge architecture.Wait later in the year for 2011 socket then we can see the extreme version of desktop computing.
    Not sure when it will come out probably this year probably next but we might see the extreme version some time later.
    Gud day to you sir.
  23. cbrunnem said:
    dont believe crysis is a single threaded game and it beats the 980x by 3 fps.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-2920xm-core-i7-980x-sandy-bridge,2851-8.html

    dont get me wrong i am not saying the the 2920xm is the superior cpu it just derserves much more credit then anyone is giving it.

    It deserves a huge amount of credit - I've long maintained that mobile is where Sandy truly shines. Mobile sandy bridge impresses the heck out of me, and I am amazed every time I see it tested.

    That having been said, that test really doesn't show a whole lot. Crysis definitely does not use more than a couple of threads, and a 5% difference at low resolutions in a laptop doesn't really tell you anything useful about true performance.
  24. I think I found an information regarding the processor. The current and the actual stepping and revision information like the below

    Model A
    Stepping 7
    Revision D2

    It is looks like one model higher than my version.
  25. I think no one has any knowledge regarding my question right?
  26. Plenty of people have told you that your processor isn't ES, you just don't want to believe them.
  27. Hmetin,
    First of all, it would be unheard of for a major computer manufacturer to sell an ES or engineering sample of a processor in a laptop. Since a ES processor would have been released over 4 months ago the manufacturer and then a laptop would be made with that processor and then returned because it had a “B2” then remade with a “B3” stepping board and then for you to pick it up does seem to be a little bit of a far shot to me. I would guess that CPU-Z hasn’t been updated with information on the release of this processor http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=52237&processor=i7-2920XM&spec-codes=SR02E. Btw this processor does support up to 16GB of RAM. The way that you can be sure is to open up the laptop and remove the heatsink and on it will be an sSpec# for this processor if it is a release processor it would be SR02E.

    Christian Wood
    Intel Enthusiast Team
  28. IntelEnthusiast said:
    Hmetin,
    First of all, it would be unheard of for a major computer manufacturer to sell an ES or engineering sample of a processor in a laptop. Since a ES processor would have been released over 4 months ago the manufacturer and then a laptop would be made with that processor and then returned because it had a “B2” then remade with a “B3” stepping board and then for you to pick it up does seem to be a little bit of a far shot to me. I would guess that CPU-Z hasn’t been updated with information on the release of this processor http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=52237&processor=i7-2920XM&spec-codes=SR02E. Btw this processor does support up to 16GB of RAM. The way that you can be sure is to open up the laptop and remove the heatsink and on it will be an sSpec# for this processor if it is a release processor it would be SR02E.

    Christian Wood
    Intel Enthusiast Team



    Hi Mr. Wood,

    I would like to say thank you for your respond. However, I will have very simple question for you

    Could you please look the below link from Tom'swardware.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-2920xm-core-i7-980x-sandy-bridge,2851.html

    If you look at it carefully, you can see that CPU-Z version is 1.56 in that article and it shows the specifications or the processor is;

    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2920XM CPU @ 2.50Ghz. and it is stepping A7 and Revision D2. Which proofs that 1.56 version recognizes the processor on right way. ( I also tried 1.56 version CPU-Z and received the same information as 1.57.1 provided.)

    My CPU-Z version is 1.57.1 which is 2 version higher than whichever has been by Tom'shardware during the test in this article, and it gives that information as its specification Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2920XM CPU @ 2.50Ghz (ES)

    This article has been published at Feb. 09, 2011. If we think that Tom'shardware bought or received it from intel in middle of the January and spent 2 weeks to test it, and published with the A7 stepping and D2 revision it at Feb. 09, 2011, how can my processor be A6 D1 3 months after than that article?

    Another question is; This processor has been officially released by Intel at Jan. 05, 2011. Please correct me if I am wrong until here.

    Are you telling me that, Intel first released Stepping A6 and Revision D1 at Jan.05, 2011 and they immediately revised it from A6, D1 to A7,D2 the revision and the stepping in 15 days after they released it? I do not believe that and nobody will believe that.

    What is your explanation under this circumstances?
  29. cjl said:
    Plenty of people have told you that your processor isn't ES, you just don't want to believe them.



    My previous respond is also for you!
  30. IntelEnthusiast said:
    Hmetin,
    First of all, it would be unheard of for a major computer manufacturer to sell an ES or engineering sample of a processor in a laptop.



    For this information, I can technically say; I do not care if they are a major brand or not. I only care what I have in my hand and paid over $3000 for what?
  31. hmetin said:
    For this information, I can technically say; I do not care if they are a major brand or not. I only care what I have in my hand and paid over $3000 for what?


    he works for intel directly. he would know. if its that big of a deal then how come you havent called the manufacturer and got this taken care of.
  32. cbrunnem said:
    he works for intel directly. he would know. if its that big of a deal then how come you havent called the manufacturer and got this taken care of.

    Sorry mate.Most of the guys here dont like mobile technology.Cuz we cant upgrade it.Sorry for being harsh.
  33. cbrunnem said:
    he works for intel directly. he would know. if its that big of a deal then how come you havent called the manufacturer and got this taken care of.



    I have already contacted with the company where sold this laptop me. They said they sometimes use (ES) processor on their laptop, but they cannot know which processor they had used in my laptop. That's why I am trying find out what this processor is
  34. I have just figured it out. This processor is not actually Engineering Sample (ES) It is an Qualification Sample (QS)
  35. hmetin said:
    I have just figured it out. This processor is not actually Engineering Sample (ES) It is an Qualification Sample (QS)



    Intel® Engineering Sample Processors ("Intel ES Processors"), also known as Intel® Qualification Sample Processors, are pre-production processors loaned to Intel's Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), Original Device Manufacturers (ODMs), and Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) to be used in the product design cycle prior to product launch.

    These processors often include additional features that production processors do not include for customer pre-production evaluation and test purposes. The following conditions apply to Intel® ES Processors:

    Intel ES Processors are the sole property of Intel
    Intel ES Processors are Intel Confidential
    Intel ES Processors are provided by Intel under nondisclosure and/or special loan agreement terms with restrictions on the recipient's handling and use
    Intel ES Processors are not for sale or re-sale
    Intel ES Processors may not have passed commercial regulatory requirements
    ES Processors are not covered under Intel warranty and are generally not supported by Intel
    How Do I Identify Intel® ES Processors?

    The easiest way to tell if you have an Intel® ES Processor is to look at the processor topside markings. If you have a 4 or 5 digit Qspec listed like the one pictured below, you have an engineering sample. A production processor will have a 5 digit sSpec, usually beginning with S, such as SLB9L on the topside markings.

    If no ink or laser markings are found, the processor may be an "unmarked" Intel ES Processor. Contact Intel if you are in possession of an unmarked Intel ES Processor.

    The Intel® Processor Identification Utility ( http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/highlights/processors/toolspiu) can also be used to help identify whether a particular processor is an Intel ES processor.

    Once you install and run Processor ID on an Intel ES Processor, the following message will appear in the text box:

    "The following Intel processor appears to be an engineering sample, not a production processor. The utility is designed to support Intel production processors only. Sample processors are not warranted by Intel and are not intended for resale."
  36. spl323 said:
    Intel® Engineering Sample Processors ("Intel ES Processors"), also known as Intel® Qualification Sample Processors, are pre-production processors loaned to Intel's Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), Original Device Manufacturers (ODMs), and Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) to be used in the product design cycle prior to product launch.

    These processors often include additional features that production processors do not include for customer pre-production evaluation and test purposes. The following conditions apply to Intel® ES Processors:

    Intel ES Processors are the sole property of Intel
    Intel ES Processors are Intel Confidential
    Intel ES Processors are provided by Intel under nondisclosure and/or special loan agreement terms with restrictions on the recipient's handling and use
    Intel ES Processors are not for sale or re-sale
    Intel ES Processors may not have passed commercial regulatory requirements
    ES Processors are not covered under Intel warranty and are generally not supported by Intel
    How Do I Identify Intel® ES Processors?

    The easiest way to tell if you have an Intel® ES Processor is to look at the processor topside markings. If you have a 4 or 5 digit Qspec listed like the one pictured below, you have an engineering sample. A production processor will have a 5 digit sSpec, usually beginning with S, such as SLB9L on the topside markings.

    If no ink or laser markings are found, the processor may be an "unmarked" Intel ES Processor. Contact Intel if you are in possession of an unmarked Intel ES Processor.

    The Intel® Processor Identification Utility ( http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/highlights/processors/toolspiu) can also be used to help identify whether a particular processor is an Intel ES processor.

    Once you install and run Processor ID on an Intel ES Processor, the following message will appear in the text box:

    "The following Intel processor appears to be an engineering sample, not a production processor. The utility is designed to support Intel production processors only. Sample processors are not warranted by Intel and are not intended for resale."


    As I posted on previous message, I found out what it was. It was not an ES. It was a QS and all QS processors can be identified by Processor ID Utility of intel.
  37. I also believe that ES series are different than QS series because as you mentioned in your message Intel Processor Identification utility does not recognize ES series processors, but it recognizes QS series processors.
  38. I just stumbled upon this thread through google. I found it helpful since I am considering buying a i7-2720qm ES. To the OP, congrats on figuring out what your processor was. I wonder why the retailer gave you a QS, you should have gotten an OEM/production version. You may want to try notebookreview.com forums. Everyone there is on a laptop, so there are none of these Desktop/laptop arguments.

    Later
  39. Buy these laptop from reliable retailers like newegg, or tigerdirect, some sellers from ebay will use discounted ES models in your PC or laptops, and believe me you can get these ES models at 70% discounted price in China. I am not saying these ES model is bad, but they are not as good as the offical ones, and they don't have any warranty on them. BTW, if you bought a customized laptop from ebay or some unknown webistes, mostly the warranty is voided due to the upgrades.
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