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Is it time for me to buy a new PC?

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January 30, 2011 12:43:04 PM

I bought a Dell Dimension 9200 (also known as an XPS 410 I guess) back in Dec of 2006. Here are some of the specs:

Processor, 6400, 2.13, 2M, Core Duo-conroe, Burn 2
Card, Graphics, 128, 7300, Low Encryption, MRMGA10
Hard Drive, 250G, S2, 7.2K, 3.5 WD-HAWK
3 GIGs of Memory

I've got Windows 7 running on this machine after upgrading this winter and while it runs pretty good, it takes some time to start up (I've disabled just about every startup program that I don't need) and there are times when certain programs run a little slow (compared to running the same program on my wife's Lenovo X201 laptop with a mobile Core i7).

I don't know a ton about processors so I was curious how the conroe chip compares to the stuff today, would I notice a significant difference between that chip and the newer intel chips?

Appreciate any advice. Thx!!

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January 30, 2011 2:37:08 PM

Yes, there is a significant difference between a Core 2 Duo E6400 and a new low end Core i3 2100. The mobile Core i7 is also faster. i3 2100 is about twice as fast as an E6400. So zipping something or transcoding video would take half as much time.
If you really did perform a Windows 7 upgrade that's part of the problem. A clean install would have better startup time but you would have to figure out how to backup your data and move it to the new install.
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January 30, 2011 5:28:16 PM

UniqueName said:
Yes, there is a significant difference between a Core 2 Duo E6400 and a new low end Core i3 2100. The mobile Core i7 is also faster. i3 2100 is about twice as fast as an E6400. So zipping something or transcoding video would take half as much time.
If you really did perform a Windows 7 upgrade that's part of the problem. A clean install would have better startup time but you would have to figure out how to backup your data and move it to the new install.

Reinstalling sounds like too much of a pain. Thanks for the info about the processor. Perhaps I'll start looking for a cheaper desktop in the near future.
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January 30, 2011 6:49:09 PM

You might want to build your own like me. I have a XPS 410,I gave my daughter.Still works just barley plays wow. I have been pricing out a build my own and prebuilt with the same parts.You will pay $200 or more for the building of that prebuilt.

Good luck.
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January 30, 2011 7:22:30 PM

therightstuff said:
You might want to build your own like me. I have a XPS 410,I gave my daughter.Still works just barley plays wow. I have been pricing out a build my own and prebuilt with the same parts.You will pay $200 or more for the building of that prebuilt.

Good luck.

I've thought about building my own but I am not sure it is the best route for me. There is a lot I'd have to learn before I started so I didn't mess something up. I know building your own can be cheaper but if you are patient I think you can find a good deal now and again that makes a pre-built very competitive with building your own.
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January 30, 2011 7:26:44 PM

Best answer selected by bp_.
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January 30, 2011 7:28:04 PM

The quality of those deals doesn't compare to the build of your own. Which is why prebuilts usually are slow and obsolete within 3 years, where-as one you build yourself usually lasts much longer. Nevermind the fact that you can easily upgrade your own because it uses standardized components, rather than the proprietary crap the can't be upgraded outside of the OEM components, which are usually marked up, or just hard to find.
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