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Flash if shooting macro?

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Anonymous
January 30, 2005 9:25:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with a
macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well without flash
or even use external flash but on an extension cord?

Jimmy

More about : flash shooting macro

Anonymous
January 30, 2005 9:25:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jimmy Smith" <nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote in message
news:Z_dLd.8198$gS5.7891@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with
> a
> macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well without flash
> or even use external flash but on an extension cord?
>
> Jimmy
>
>
Here's a couple of shots done with a 20D, Tamron 90mm f2.8 Macro and two
monolights, 350w/s each, at a 45 deg. angle from the subject:

http://www.shutterspeedway.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?user...

A ringlight might have illuminated the inside of the wheel well a little
better.

http://www.shutterspeedway.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?user...

Again, a ringlight may have done a better job of lighting the upper part of
the wheel, but, overall, more than acceptable results, IMHO.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
January 31, 2005 2:35:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 18:25:21 -0500, "Jimmy Smith"
<nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote:

>Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with a
>macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well without flash
>or even use external flash but on an extension cord?
>
>Jimmy
>


I am satisfied with the ones using an off-camera flash, on an extent
ion cord, as you call it.


--
Charles

Does not play well with others.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 3:11:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jimmy Smith wrote:
> Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos
> with a macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well
> without flash or even use external flash but on an extension cord?
>
> Jimmy

Of course not. It is just easier to get "good" lighting with one.
Usually the best lighting is done using other methods. Ring lights are a
favorite of medical photographers because it is easy, quick and consistent.
Since they are big consumers of that market, equipment is made fro them.
For art or advertising work, I suggest working without a ring light most of
the time.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 4:16:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 18:25:21 -0500, "Jimmy Smith"
<nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote:

>Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos

I use bright incandescent light for most of my macro "stuff".

Personally, I think a ring flash produces terrible light for making
macro photographs. Oh, don't get me wrong, ring flash has its
place... that place being in any situation where you simply want to
document something small. eg. Taking a pic of a wart on a toad's bum
for a high school science book.

..
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 8:29:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jimmy Smith <nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote:
: Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with a
: macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well without flash
: or even use external flash but on an extension cord?

: Jimmy

The big problem with camera mounted (or built in flashes) is the tendancy
to cast shadows from the lens, your hand, etc onto the subject. So you
either need a ring or a flash placed away from the camera. One
disadvantage of a ring flash in Macro is, since all the light comes from
directly around the lens, there is no light/dark shading which tends to
make for "flattened" images. The better choice would be a flash to one
side (about 45 deg) of the object and a fill flash to the other 45 to keep
the shadows from being too dark. I have also seen a device in a catalog
called a cloud dome. It is a frosted plastic dome which you place the
subject under and attach the camera to a hole in the top. Then one or two
flashes are placed around the dome to illuminate the subject without being
too intense (which at close ranges can cause highlight problems without
some type of diffuser).

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 11:59:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jimmy Smith" <nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote in message
news:Z_dLd.8198$gS5.7891@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with
a
> macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)?

A ring flash gives flat, featureless lighting with minimal shadow, important
for some macro applications but a little too flat for most. Some ring
flashes get around this by having a setting where you just use half the
flash in order to get a little more shadow.

Many photographers get perfectly good results with an on-camera flash. The
built-in flash on most cameras usually sits too low to be useful, but the
typical external flash sits up high enough that it can shoot over the lens
for just about any shot. You reduce shadows if necessary by using
appropriately placed reflectors.
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 9:09:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

IF the sun is on your side .. its fine to not use flash.
I am a fan of natural ambient light , so if you ask me to have ring flash
illuminating my object is personally don't really like it .

You really have to consider what object you are shooting.

I shot items from jewelleries to small bugs ... and my approach to each and
one of them are different.

=bob=


"Jimmy Smith" <nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote in message
news:Z_dLd.8198$gS5.7891@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with
> a
> macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well without flash
> or even use external flash but on an extension cord?
>
> Jimmy
>
>
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 9:35:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

If you use flash you can shoot with a small aperture, the flash is your
shutter (1/10.000sec.).
I just bought the canon ef 100mm 2.8 macro usm lens and i love it.
These are my first testshots: http://members.lycos.nl/eddysign/Macro/
Made with only one flash with a flashtrigger and a softbox .

Have fun
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 12:43:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Using an on camera flash with a macro lens is not the way to go. Ideally,
the flash should be on the same plane as the macro lens.. An off camera
flash will do the job nicely


\

"[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote in message
news:41fdd9d1$0$23776$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
> IF the sun is on your side .. its fine to not use flash.
> I am a fan of natural ambient light , so if you ask me to have ring flash
> illuminating my object is personally don't really like it .
>
> You really have to consider what object you are shooting.
>
> I shot items from jewelleries to small bugs ... and my approach to each
> and one of them are different.
>
> =bob=
>
>
> "Jimmy Smith" <nospam@pleaseno.more> wrote in message
> news:Z_dLd.8198$gS5.7891@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
>> Is it really necessary to use a ring flash to take good macro photos with
>> a
>> macro lens (ie Canon 100mm Macro f/2.8)? Or can you do well without
>> flash
>> or even use external flash but on an extension cord?
>>
>> Jimmy
>>
>>
>
>
February 1, 2005 12:43:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bernard Saper wrote:
> Using an on camera flash with a macro lens is not the way to go. Ideally,
> the flash should be on the same plane as the macro lens.. An off camera
> flash will do the job nicely
>

I never did a lot of macro photography, but I did some with a Nikkor
60mm AF Micro. I used a PC cord to put the flash where I wanted it.
Sometimes it worked better than others.

Most of my successful shots were done with available light.

In photography books where they show examples of photos shot with ring
lights, I don't care for the way they turn out. Very flat lighting. Good
for medical documentation, perhaps.

Bob
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 12:43:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

bob wrote:
> Bernard Saper wrote:
>> Using an on camera flash with a macro lens is not the way to go.
>> Ideally, the flash should be on the same plane as the macro lens.. An
>> off camera flash will do the job nicely
>>
>
> I never did a lot of macro photography, but I did some with a Nikkor
> 60mm AF Micro. I used a PC cord to put the flash where I wanted it.
> Sometimes it worked better than others.
>
> Most of my successful shots were done with available light.
>
> In photography books where they show examples of photos shot with ring
> lights, I don't care for the way they turn out. Very flat lighting.
> Good for medical documentation, perhaps.
>
> Bob

Back in the day I spent a bit of energy on a macro-flash setup, and not
much money. It worked well, with some trials and a lot of luck. I found
the twenty-year-old bracket, and made a few photos of it today, learning
a couple other lessons _en passant_. See four views at:

http://www.fototime.com/inv/D56F405F8D8FCAC

You can imagine how versatile the bracket was, getting the flash into
many macro positions, or up and away from the lens for anti-redeye
purposes.

Light adjustment for macro work could be accomplished by adjusting the
strobe, different strobes, diffusers of various thicknesses and styles,
bounce, and so forth.


--
Frank ess
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 11:19:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Edwin Bont" <nospam@wanadoo.nl> wrote in message
news:41fe6c65$0$26221$18b6e80@news.wanadoo.nl...
> If you use flash you can shoot with a small aperture, the flash is your
> shutter (1/10.000sec.).
> I just bought the canon ef 100mm 2.8 macro usm lens and i love it.
> These are my first testshots: http://members.lycos.nl/eddysign/Macro/
> Made with only one flash with a flashtrigger and a softbox .

Edwin,

Great pictures. If I may ask, which camera did you use for these pix?

Jimmy


>
> Have fun
>
>
!