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Will my CPU bottleneck these graphics cards?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 3, 2010 12:48:27 AM

Will my Core i7 930 @ 2.8 GHz (stock) bottleneck Two Radeon HD 5870's in crossfire?

How much performance loss will this bottleneck cause?
a c 217 U Graphics card
December 3, 2010 1:17:26 AM

Is this just a boast post? Your CPU is near the fastest you can get.

If you play at a low resolution, the CPU will hold up the GPU's, but it won't matter as you'll have well over your monitors refresh rate and wouldn't be able see a difference. Monitors aren't capible of displaying more FPS than their refresh rate.

At high resolutions (think 2560x1600 or eyefinity setups) the GPU's will hold back your CPU.

In a few situations, you will find OCing your CPU to 3.5 Ghz, or a little more may give you more FPS.
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a c 189 U Graphics card
December 3, 2010 2:01:57 AM

OC your CPU just a little bit (3.0GHz or more) then you'll set up, any dual cards setup won't hold back your CPU.
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December 3, 2010 2:39:04 AM

We will find out how much of a bottleneck i7 930 is after Sandy Bridge's release. The difference between these CPU's is your answer.

Right now as far as gaming's concerned, any i7 cpu will give you nearly the same performance clock for clock.
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December 3, 2010 4:48:30 PM

bystander said:
Is this just a boast post? Your CPU is near the fastest you can get.

If you play at a low resolution, the CPU will hold up the GPU's, but it won't matter as you'll have well over your monitors refresh rate and wouldn't be able see a difference. Monitors aren't capible of displaying more FPS than their refresh rate.

At high resolutions (think 2560x1600 or eyefinity setups) the GPU's will hold back your CPU.

In a few situations, you will find OCing your CPU to 3.5 Ghz, or a little more may give you more FPS.


Two HD 5870's shouldn't have any problems running games at 1920x1080 with no AA (AA isn't necessary at high-res).

Even Crysis at that resolution gives about 40-50 fps.

As far as bottlenecks go, the higher resolution you play at, the more load goes onto your GPU. Sometimes with relatively slow processors, higher resolutions may actually result in more performance.
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a b U Graphics card
December 3, 2010 5:14:12 PM

Why do people keep saying that AA is not needed at high res, it is never the case. Some games benefit more than others with AA but resolution does not eliminate jaggies.

Also, I find that whole cpu/gpu load thing does not make sense. Computers execute the instructions as they are told to. I cannot see why the 1's and 0's that pass into an out of a cpu would change with gpu load. Game settings perhaps but not the utilisation of the gpu.
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December 3, 2010 5:24:44 PM

ambam said:
Will my Core i7 930 @ 2.8 GHz (stock) bottleneck Two Radeon HD 5870's in crossfire?

How much performance loss will this bottleneck cause?


No way dude, at least I wont think so. in about a year or two from now prooly when newer gpu's and games are released. 930 can handle about anything now, and two 5870's is enough power to max out anything.....(maybe not crysis) But your good dude i got one 5870 and it handles well.
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a c 217 U Graphics card
December 3, 2010 7:33:35 PM

ambam said:
Two HD 5870's shouldn't have any problems running games at 1920x1080 with no AA (AA isn't necessary at high-res).

Even Crysis at that resolution gives about 40-50 fps.

As far as bottlenecks go, the higher resolution you play at, the more load goes onto your GPU. Sometimes with relatively slow processors, higher resolutions may actually result in more performance.


I'm a little confused by this follow up. You quoted me, but your post has almost no relavence to what I wrote.

You are also quite mistaken by your last point. Putting more stress on the GPU by upping the resolution does not increase FPS.
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a b U Graphics card
December 3, 2010 7:57:06 PM

Some people seem to be of the mind that putting more load on one of the components takes load off the other or so it seems to me, hence why people think that loading a gpu will lessen the load on the cpu and allow higher fps in exchange. Doesn't make sense to me but that is how I understand the thinking.
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December 3, 2010 8:07:26 PM

I asked a similar question a while back, and I've learned the answer here for the most part is NO.

Your cpu should be able to oc to ATLEAST 3.2ghz on the stock cooler (indeed, I've seen alot of people say that reaching 3.5 on i7 is dead easy), and that should keep you chugging along nicely

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a c 217 U Graphics card
December 3, 2010 8:42:27 PM

strangestranger said:
Some people seem to be of the mind that putting more load on one of the components takes load off the other or so it seems to me, hence why people think that loading a gpu will lessen the load on the cpu and allow higher fps in exchange. Doesn't make sense to me but that is how I understand the thinking.


The part that isn't understood is that loading the GPU more does not take load off the CPU, unless the GPU is bottlenecking the system, which would obviously mean the FPS had to go down to take load off the CPU.
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December 4, 2010 12:12:22 AM

Ev1lryu said:
I asked a similar question a while back, and I've learned the answer here for the most part is NO.

Your cpu should be able to oc to ATLEAST 3.2ghz on the stock cooler (indeed, I've seen alot of people say that reaching 3.5 on i7 is dead easy), and that should keep you chugging along nicely


I've got a ZALMAN CNPS9900 aftermarket CPU cooler.

It's not the best, but it's infinitely better than the stock Intel cooler.
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