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Quick question about static

Last response: in Systems
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February 2, 2011 2:00:32 AM

Hey,

Im a bit concerned about screwing an expensive component up from a static shock when I build my new computer.. The case and power supply are 100% black painted. So if I plug in an old, unpainted pc and use that to ground myself with an antistatic wrist strap as well as touching it regularly, will that work properly? Because I heard somewhere that your body has to have the exact same charge as the case your actually working with, not something else.


Thanks

More about : quick question static

February 2, 2011 2:28:07 AM

Hi,, Using a secondary object for ground will only work if it too is attached to the original, better yet just make sure that you are on a non static surface anything that is not a carpet or rug will do and keep your paws away from the fingers of any electronics,,[card fingers and the like] ,, AND TAKE YOUR TIME so you can do it right the first time.....:) 
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a b ) Power supply
February 2, 2011 2:39:57 AM

It's true that you have to share a common ground with your computer case. Best thing to do is install the PSU 1st, plug it in and leave the switch in the back turned off. This will ground the case through the PSU, and just attach a static wrist strap to the case, or touch it regularly.
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February 2, 2011 2:51:59 AM

cmcghee358 said:
It's true that you have to share a common ground with your computer case. Best thing to do is install the PSU 1st, plug it in and leave the switch in the back turned off. This will ground the case through the PSU, and just attach a static wrist strap to the case, or touch it regularly.



Yeah but would that still work through the paint? Or could I just put screw randomly somewhere in the case and attach the antistatic wriststrap to that ?
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a b ) Power supply
February 2, 2011 3:08:18 AM

The PSU mount screws ground the PSU to the case through the mount. As far as the strap, it's best to clip it to a non-painted screw or rivet.
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February 2, 2011 3:55:04 AM

Static is a concern, I'm a tech myself. If you don't have a wrist strap, best practice, build on a clean service, preferably wood table, in an area with no carpet. After that, mainly make sure to touch metal unpainted part of the case, when you pick up parts, make sure to handle everything by the edges. NEVER by the pins. Use common sense and you will be fine.
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February 2, 2011 7:36:26 AM

ohiou_grad_06 said:
Static is a concern, I'm a tech myself. If you don't have a wrist strap, best practice, build on a clean service, preferably wood table, in an area with no carpet. After that, mainly make sure to touch metal unpainted part of the case, when you pick up parts, make sure to handle everything by the edges. NEVER by the pins. Use common sense and you will be fine.


There is no unpainted part of this case. Except the inside of the screw holes I guess but surely that's no where near enough surface area for fully discharging myself.. Would the screw thing work?
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a c 104 ) Power supply
February 2, 2011 10:36:08 AM

Yes, if you think about it,
a wristband 'only' has a croc clip securing it, theres not much surface area, but not much is needed to provide a path for the current
Either scratch/sand off a section of paint (thats unseen in use) to use as a grounding point, or connect your wristband to a screw and screw that into the case at the point of your choice
I cobbled a grounding clip for a vacuum cleaner together, check my link, although I may revise the guide having read this, provide details for grounding whilst building/maintaining systems
hope this helps,
Moto
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February 2, 2011 12:06:58 PM

Guess I am just careless. I just touch the case to unleash any static before grabbing any parts. I am yet to have a static issue with all the builds I have done. This even includes moving everything to a new case while sitting on the carpeted floor with the cases also on the floor (admittedly this really was lazy on my part)
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March 26, 2011 4:51:28 PM

asteldian said:
Guess I am just careless. I just touch the case to unleash any static before grabbing any parts. I am yet to have a static issue with all the builds I have done. This even includes moving everything to a new case while sitting on the carpeted floor with the cases also on the floor (admittedly this really was lazy on my part)


So I'm not the only one who has done that...

Really though while many people (especially myself) have built computers in entirely carpeted apartments without a wrist strap, ESD should always be something to keep in the back of your mind. If you can feel a static "zap", that's about 1,500 V. If you hear it, around 6,000 V. If you can see it too, that zap is moving about 8,000 V; while only 10-200 V in the right place will damage a component. So *theoretically* you could ruin a board just by touching it and never even know you did it. How often that actually happens I have no idea.
As a general rule I never set anything aside from the case itself on carpet, and I'll touch a known ground before I handle any components. It's also a good practice to handle any boards and cpus by the edges, and I prefer to wear nitrile gloves to keep destructive oils from my skin off the pcb (which may or may not decrease risk of ESD, I honestly don't know). Wearing a wrist strap is also good practice, and remember that the psu should be plugged in but still switched off to be an effective ground.

I hope this info helps.
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