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PC Upgrade "Whoopsies"... what were yours?

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February 2, 2011 5:21:44 PM

I'm set to recieve my parts either today or (because of "bad weather") tomorrow. Since I'll be reusing some major components, I won't be able to have the new and old hardware powered up simultaneously.

I don't have RAID set up, and I do have a USB SATA dock to get info off of the old drives if need be.

My question is -- what are those things that you forget to migrate over from an old pc?

I have:

* Outlook PST files
* Saved Games
* Media files (photos/vids/documents)
* Gather list of installed programs; get installers ready
* Get media for windows install ready
* Windows updates

Are there ways to migrate the following easily without re-downloading everything? (lousy comcast 250gb/month cap)
* Steam Games
* ITunes Library

More about : upgrade whoopsies

February 2, 2011 5:56:55 PM

For Steam make a copy of your steamapps file and move to your new hdd.
That way you won't have to re-install all your games .
Don't know about i-tunes though.
February 2, 2011 6:05:17 PM

davcon said:
For Steam make a copy of your steamapps file and move to your new hdd.
That way you won't have to re-install all your games .
Don't know about i-tunes though.


Thanks; that'll be a huge help. I imagine I should make sure the drive letters are the same for that to work.
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February 2, 2011 6:07:10 PM

Can you boot from usb on the new Mobo?
if so, once you've installed on the new set up, put the old drive on usb and boot into that windows, copy whatever you need from it onto your new drive, as long as you move them to exactly the same named folder path I.E. [User/my documents/my music], you shouldn't have any issues.
Moto
February 2, 2011 6:11:45 PM

Any DRM will need to be backed up and moved also.

If you will be installing a memory card reader, do not connect it until after Windows is installed, otherwise all of its drive letters will be assigned first, and you'll end up with your boot drive being I: or some such.

I would NOT boot from the old drive into Windows; that will send its Windows into a driver purge and binge frenzy, which may not end up with a drive that will be stable on either mobo. Hooking up the old drive is a great idea, but just don't boot from it.

Don't forget your IE (or other browser) Favorites, .ini files, and other configuration settings.

February 2, 2011 6:13:50 PM

Motopsychojdn; thanks for the reply, but I've got two issues with that approach:

Yes, I'd be able to boot from USB; however I'm not sure if Windows itself would be able to -- it will be a different mobo and processor (old: asus formula maximus/q6600, new: asusP8P67 Deluxe/i7-2600k). The other issue is that the new hard drive won't be big enough to store the data (it's an 120gb SSD for a boot C:\ drive vs. my old 1TB boot drive which was overkill for that purpose).
February 2, 2011 6:15:25 PM

Onus said:
Any DRM will need to be backed up and moved also.

If you will be installing a memory card reader, do not connect it until after Windows is installed, otherwise all of its drive letters will be assigned first, and you'll end up with your boot drive being I: or some such.

I would NOT boot from the old drive into Windows; that will send its Windows into a driver purge and binge frenzy, which may not end up with a drive that will be stable on either mobo. Hooking up the old drive is a great idea, but just don't boot from it.

Don't forget your IE (or other browser) Favorites, .ini files, and other configuration settings.


Great call on the browser favorites.. that wasn't on my list! I'm looking around for product keys for apps now (from before I started using KeePass for all of that).
February 2, 2011 7:45:56 PM

Do remember to shift your controllers out of IDE mode in the BIOS before you install OS on new PC. That one usually gets me once a year >.<
February 2, 2011 8:02:48 PM

banthracis said:
Do remember to shift your controllers out of IDE mode in the BIOS before you install OS on new PC. That one usually gets me once a year >.<


Another good one; I've been burned by that.

I'm going to have a fun time figuring out the gotchas of SSD and the difference of the BIOS replacement... what was it called again? UEFI?
February 3, 2011 3:17:05 AM

SSD can be treated as a normal SATA drive nothing really special there. You should disable indexing, prefetch and superfetch for them though.

Buncha other stuff you can do to save space on them as well. Junctioning, moving virtual memory off them, disabling hibernation, etc.

UEFI is essentially a graphical UI bios. No other major changes from user experience end.

Also, you have a SB mobo you're still gonna use o.O
February 3, 2011 1:12:47 PM

In above guide,

Step 3 is a bad idea. You can reduce the space, but don't disable it or you may end up regretting it big time.

Step 11 large system cache should be enabled not disabled for max performance. I'm not sure the authors reasoning for that suggestion. I suppose he could be trying to minimize read/writes on your SSD, but honestly that really isn't an issue.

Rest is very good though.
February 3, 2011 1:17:01 PM

I'm still torn on Step 3. I have a windows home server running nightly backups, but still it would be nice to have a belt-and-suspenders approach with system restore. I understand the reasoning (sys restore is a big performance hit before installations, and adds to the disk writes).

Thanks for the advice on step 11. I would have thought the reasoning would have been before TRIM, but that article's dated this past December.
!