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Batch Enhancer

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Anonymous
January 31, 2005 7:40:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In my line of work, I often take dozens of photos for record purposes.

What's a good (preferably free!) software I can use to adjust brightness,
contract, sharpness of a whole batch of photos?

Thanks.

More about : batch enhancer

Anonymous
January 31, 2005 7:40:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eugel Yeo wrote:
> In my line of work, I often take dozens of photos for record purposes.
>
> What's a good (preferably free!) software I can use to adjust
> brightness, contract, sharpness of a whole batch of photos?

Try the One-step Photo Fix function in Paint Shop Pro 9. The program has
a batch mode and can run scripts.

http://www.jasc.com/en/products/?

Cheers,
David
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 7:40:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Irfanview--free at www.irfanview.com

Paul B.
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Anonymous
January 31, 2005 7:40:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eugel Yeo wrote:
>
> In my line of work, I often take dozens of photos for record purposes.
>
> What's a good (preferably free!) software I can use to adjust brightness,
> contract, sharpness of a whole batch of photos?

photobatch.
http://www.prismaticsoftware.com/

very valuable tool.


>
> Thanks.
January 31, 2005 7:40:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Look at DCE auto-enhance
Eugel Yeo wrote:
> In my line of work, I often take dozens of photos for record
purposes.
>
> What's a good (preferably free!) software I can use to adjust
brightness,
> contract, sharpness of a whole batch of photos?
>
> Thanks.
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 10:02:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>>>> In my line of work, I often take dozens of photos for record purposes.
>>>>> What's a good (preferably free!) software I can use to adjust
>>>>> brightness, contract, sharpness of a whole batch of photos?

I've tried a few different auto-fix batch-processing programs, and have been
either disappointed or horrified by some of the results. If you can
download free programs (e.g,, Ifranview) or trials that others have
recommended, definitely give them a shot. About a year ago I bought a
Roxio photo-editor that batch processes a variety of high-powerd and
multiple fixes simulatenously, and I don't use it at all--the pics look
horrendous. I tried JASC in a free online trial, but didn't find it workable
for the fixes I like (I find a BlackPoint/WhitePoint fix essential).

I take hundreds of photos at a time, and I am really happy with two
programs, that I am applying to literally thousands of archived photos just
now. Why I am happy is that whereas the previous autofixes I've tried made
pictures look from dubious to grotesque, the functions in these two new
software acquisitions (particularly the MS ones) are super clean and
natural--the pics just look much BETTER, not overprocessed or hoary. I
adjust them this way:

I run all pics initally through the "levels" enhancement of Microsoft's
Digital Image Pro 10 (which I bought as part of a Digital Image Suite 10
package for about $40 after rebates--though I don't use the album function);
this adjusts black point and white point, and makes the pictures look much
less washed out. It would also be possible to run them (separately) through
a batch contrast enhancement, a batch exposure enhancement, and a batch
color correction. The problem with the program is that despite my 1gb of
RAM and widely expanded virtual memory cache, I still can only reliably
process 75 pics at a time without getting a memory error, so every now and
then I go back to the computer where they are running and click through
saving and running the next auto-batched series.

AFTER running the levels fix in the MS program, I then run BOTH the
levels-enhanced pics AND the original unenhanced pics through the PhotoViz
1.1, that I paid $30 for after a free trial (I'm ashamed to say, I learned
about it through a spam message on this newsgroup--but I'm glad I did). In
this program, I run both sets simultaneously through the Contrast fix
(selected in the advanced menu) with a Saturation setting of 9 (as opposed
to the default setting of 10)--this also includes a sharpening fix, which I
let run at the default setting. One nice thing about this program is it can
process an endless number of pics in a folder, and the other night I ran
over 6000 photos through it (that took about 10 hours overnight).

Then I compare all 3 resulting pics and the one original in quick succession
in Compupic--deleting all but the most favorable. Sometimes none of them
will do: the VizPro contrast can blanch-out faces, and sometimes the MS
program will come up with a ghastly green cast on the occasional rare
photo--and for these photos I just use Compupic and change the black and
white point manually on the original pic, and keep that one (this doesn't
take long).

Other things that are phenomenal about the MS program is that if you take a
bunch of pics you want to fix in other ways, you can run them through the
program and manually apply these features fairly quickly: the
"straightening" function (you pick two points that should be straight, and
the program straightens them to fit that line, and then autocrops the photo
to maximize the resulting rectangle); and the variety of touch-up functions
that allow you to wipe away lines, blemishes, and entire objects with a few
mouse clicks; you can also INCREASE the contrast or other functions simply
by clicking on that fix multiple times manually. This is a SUPER program
for people who want to run batches and get superb quality--or who want to
blaze through edits fairly quickly.

But do see what you can get for free first!

If I had only one program, I would go with the MS Digital Image Pro, and if
I only had a limited number of photos, I would just run them through
manually, and click on each one till they looked right--it is really
convenient, fast, and good (particularly for those who don't want to learn
Photoshop!).
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 12:43:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>>photobatch.
> http://www.prismaticsoftware.com/
> very valuable tool.

That looks like a terrific program--especially for $20. Just one
question--for people who don't know (and don't want to spend months
learning) which parameters for any particular function might be optimal for
running batches (because the program asks you to set your own parameters for
each batch-run fix--out of the blue) is there a resource (e.g., website) you
can recommend that can offer recommended settings for the many adjustments
offered?
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 1:40:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Douglas W. Hoyt wrote:
>
> >>>photobatch.
> > http://www.prismaticsoftware.com/
> > very valuable tool.
>
> That looks like a terrific program--especially for $20. Just one
> question--for people who don't know (and don't want to spend months
> learning) which parameters for any particular function might be optimal for
> running batches (because the program asks you to set your own parameters for
> each batch-run fix--out of the blue) is there a resource (e.g., website) you
> can recommend that can offer recommended settings for the many adjustments
> offered?

I just tried it, experimented a few times,
and found that it could do batch unsharp masking,
and batch gamma adjustment. that alone is worth $20.
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 10:14:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks!
What you go through is definitely more than what I plan to, but the
MS Digital Image Pro sounds pretty enticing.
Cheers.



"Douglas W. Hoyt" <nospamthankyoumam@nada.net> wrote in message
news:tBALd.22239$nA7.9675@fe03.lga...
> >>>>> In my line of work, I often take dozens of photos for record
purposes.
> >>>>> What's a good (preferably free!) software I can use to adjust
> >>>>> brightness, contract, sharpness of a whole batch of photos?
>
> I've tried a few different auto-fix batch-processing programs, and have
been
> either disappointed or horrified by some of the results. If you can
> download free programs (e.g,, Ifranview) or trials that others have
> recommended, definitely give them a shot. About a year ago I bought a
> Roxio photo-editor that batch processes a variety of high-powerd and
> multiple fixes simulatenously, and I don't use it at all--the pics look
> horrendous. I tried JASC in a free online trial, but didn't find it
workable
> for the fixes I like (I find a BlackPoint/WhitePoint fix essential).
>
> I take hundreds of photos at a time, and I am really happy with two
> programs, that I am applying to literally thousands of archived photos
just
> now. Why I am happy is that whereas the previous autofixes I've tried
made
> pictures look from dubious to grotesque, the functions in these two new
> software acquisitions (particularly the MS ones) are super clean and
> natural--the pics just look much BETTER, not overprocessed or hoary. I
> adjust them this way:
>
> I run all pics initally through the "levels" enhancement of Microsoft's
> Digital Image Pro 10 (which I bought as part of a Digital Image Suite 10
> package for about $40 after rebates--though I don't use the album
function);
> this adjusts black point and white point, and makes the pictures look much
> less washed out. It would also be possible to run them (separately)
through
> a batch contrast enhancement, a batch exposure enhancement, and a batch
> color correction. The problem with the program is that despite my 1gb of
> RAM and widely expanded virtual memory cache, I still can only reliably
> process 75 pics at a time without getting a memory error, so every now and
> then I go back to the computer where they are running and click through
> saving and running the next auto-batched series.
>
> AFTER running the levels fix in the MS program, I then run BOTH the
> levels-enhanced pics AND the original unenhanced pics through the PhotoViz
> 1.1, that I paid $30 for after a free trial (I'm ashamed to say, I learned
> about it through a spam message on this newsgroup--but I'm glad I did).
In
> this program, I run both sets simultaneously through the Contrast fix
> (selected in the advanced menu) with a Saturation setting of 9 (as
opposed
> to the default setting of 10)--this also includes a sharpening fix, which
I
> let run at the default setting. One nice thing about this program is it
can
> process an endless number of pics in a folder, and the other night I ran
> over 6000 photos through it (that took about 10 hours overnight).
>
> Then I compare all 3 resulting pics and the one original in quick
succession
> in Compupic--deleting all but the most favorable. Sometimes none of them
> will do: the VizPro contrast can blanch-out faces, and sometimes the MS
> program will come up with a ghastly green cast on the occasional rare
> photo--and for these photos I just use Compupic and change the black and
> white point manually on the original pic, and keep that one (this doesn't
> take long).
>
> Other things that are phenomenal about the MS program is that if you take
a
> bunch of pics you want to fix in other ways, you can run them through the
> program and manually apply these features fairly quickly: the
> "straightening" function (you pick two points that should be straight, and
> the program straightens them to fit that line, and then autocrops the
photo
> to maximize the resulting rectangle); and the variety of touch-up
functions
> that allow you to wipe away lines, blemishes, and entire objects with a
few
> mouse clicks; you can also INCREASE the contrast or other functions
simply
> by clicking on that fix multiple times manually. This is a SUPER program
> for people who want to run batches and get superb quality--or who want to
> blaze through edits fairly quickly.
>
> But do see what you can get for free first!
>
> If I had only one program, I would go with the MS Digital Image Pro, and
if
> I only had a limited number of photos, I would just run them through
> manually, and click on each one till they looked right--it is really
> convenient, fast, and good (particularly for those who don't want to learn
> Photoshop!).
>
>
>
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 10:14:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>>>> What you go through is definitely more than what I plan to, but the MS
>>>>> Digital Image Pro sounds pretty enticing.

It is stunningly easy, and the results are excellent. Though Crownfield's
posting above regarding the $20 PhotoBatch is very intriguing--it not only
does batch corrections, but you can have it run multiple fixes on the same
image in sequence. The easy thing about the MS program is that the
automated batch-processing settings work nicely--but if you just cycle
through your pictures one at a time and do quick fixes "manually" (by
single mouseclicks) you can see each adjustment you chose to add and keep
it if you loke it, go further if you think the picture needs more
enhanceing, or undo any fix if it doesn't improve the picture. Something
like PhotoBatch, though, if you got comfortable learning it and programming
it, would perform multiple functions at one time (though I haven't tried
it).
!