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Sandy Bridge Owners; Immediate Return, or waiting?

Last response: in Systems
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Those of you with Sandy Bridge platform procs/mobos, are you keeping them for now?

Total: 0 vote

  • Keeping and Running until it exhibits a problem
  • 0 %
  • Keeping and Running 6GBps SATA until replacement available
  • 0 %
  • Immediate returning to seller, waiting for replacement.
  • 0 %
  • Immediate returning to manufacturer, waiting for replacement
  • 0 %
  • Returning to manufacturer for refund, waiting for new choices.
  • 0 %
  • Starting to buy AMD parts (rage quit)
  • 0 %
February 2, 2011 8:33:39 PM

As someone who just started getting their Sandy Bridge parts in the mail, I'm curious what other owners are planning to do, now that the very serious SATA II issue on the controller chipset has been identified.
February 2, 2011 8:48:53 PM

I just got my ASRock P67Extreme4 and it doesn't seem like it's really going to trouble me that much in the end. For now I'm going to use the SATAIII ports and continue building and then when some issue comes up or there's a very reasonable replacement policy I'll consider if it's worth it for me to go through with sending it back.
February 2, 2011 9:23:50 PM

Personally that's the route I'm going to take. Got an ASUS P8P67 Deluxe with 4 SATA II ports. Worst case, I can snake some cables around for an extra 2 (e)SATA ports. They're still 3GBps and they're a separate controller chipset.
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February 2, 2011 9:30:42 PM

Yeah, same plan here. We've got the parts ordered and they've shipped, so we're just gonna build and replace the motherboard in April when the fixed ones come out. It might be a bit of a hassle, but oh well.
February 2, 2011 9:36:29 PM

The thing that would most bother me however, is having my machine built and running, and potentially having to replace it later, with a multiple-day downtime while the parts are cross-shipping.

Let's just say I really skimped on my couch laptop (stock inspiron 1525).
February 2, 2011 9:56:44 PM

Yeah, that's gonna suck. But friend needs his pc up now and the exchange should last into next quarter when he'll be off of school, so hopefully the downtime won't be that harmful.
February 2, 2011 9:57:50 PM

What other choice do you have other than keeping them for now?? The B3 chipsets won't be out till April, so if you send your board in now, your down till April, that would be dumb.
February 3, 2011 12:34:07 AM

Ive got all my sandy bridge parts together and running a 24 hr. water test and be firing it up tomorrow. I'll run the system until Asus has a new MB ready for me.
February 4, 2011 5:07:48 AM

So I shouldn't regret ordering my parts on amazon?
February 4, 2011 2:23:14 PM

Mine's finally up and running (with a nice SSD); seems pretty good, although the 2nd controller for SATA's being a bit finicky. This thing runs quiet and cool.
February 4, 2011 2:53:43 PM

I'm actually building out my rig tonight... Asus P8P67pro with the i5 2500k.

I currently only have a WD Black 7200 and an optical drive... so I am fine for now. In april when I can replace the board I'm going to pick up a new SSD, hook that up to the new board either in the marvell or working Sata II ports (or put the HDD on the Marvell/Sata II and the SSD on the intel SATA III), and re-install windows. It will be like a new upgrade for a new machine... should be pretty fun :) 

But, in the mean time using the Intel/Marvell SATA ports with the option to use the eSATA with some cable routing is not the end of the world. I just hate to have to scrape off that thermal paste from my CPU heatsink and drive 45min to NCIX for a replacement... kinda sucks but not that big of a deal really.
February 4, 2011 2:53:51 PM

I'll be returning mine on during the last week of March hoping that I won't be left without my rig for too long
right now it's running awesomely
February 4, 2011 3:07:50 PM

I'm hoping that since I bought mine in store at NCIX I can just call ahead, walk in with the broken board and walk out with the fixed.... however I'm skeptical.

Damn these P67 boards and their slight flaw... yet otherwise awesome performance.
February 4, 2011 4:10:53 PM

On my p8p67 deluxe, all of the SATA II ports are Intel. I have 4x Intel Sata II 3GBps, 2x Intel SATA III 6GBps, and 2x Marvell SATA III 6GBps.

Unless you're talking about the eSATA port(s) on the back? At any rate, be sure, before you lose data on your SATA II ports.
February 4, 2011 4:14:00 PM

I wish my poll itself wasn't a fail. I was curious to see what the distribution was, but for some reason couldn't get it to let people vote.
February 5, 2011 8:17:43 PM

dLou said:
So I shouldn't regret ordering my parts on amazon?

No way, My asus board is up and running. I bought the P8P67 deluxe. It's got 4 of the 6Gbs ports. Everthing else I've read about the board says its the best out there.
February 5, 2011 9:45:32 PM

odienpooke said:
No way, My asus board is up and running. I bought the P8P67 deluxe. It's got 4 of the 6Gbs ports. Everthing else I've read about the board says its the best out there.


Out of curiosity, are you getting crazy stop errors too? I'm trying to narrow down if I have faulty hardware (board, cpu, SSD, graphics card), or just bad drivers somewhere.

I'm getting many different stop errors and having difficulty narrowing down a cause.
February 6, 2011 4:56:36 PM

aardwolf said:
Out of curiosity, are you getting crazy stop errors too? I'm trying to narrow down if I have faulty hardware (board, cpu, SSD, graphics card), or just bad drivers somewhere.

I'm getting many different stop errors and having difficulty narrowing down a cause.



Yes , mine keeps restarting and the led on back of board gives me a code 59. Which has something to do with the CPU micro-code. trying to update bios now. Must say Cryis is looking better than ever.
February 6, 2011 7:00:24 PM

My board looks like it has a bad DIMM slot 0. Finally got it stable after lots and lots of memtest-86 runs. (Test 5 especially flaked out)

I'll have to give crysis another shot now -- it was unplayable due to all of the crashes before (and it starts out in the night level; not great for the visuals compared to later in the game).
February 7, 2011 12:27:55 AM

Just quit cryis, everything looks so dam good. Explosions look real. After flashing BIOS most of the bugs are gone. How dimms you running? I've read that the best is to run only 2. I'm running only slots 2 & 4.
February 7, 2011 2:26:25 AM

I'm keeping mine. Only using the two SATA III ports.
February 7, 2011 10:01:19 PM

I'm running (I know it's a bad idea) 3 DIMMS... slots 1,2,3 (slot 0 is empty; I have to determine if the slot is dusty, bad, or I have a bad DIMM -- memcheck test 5 goes NUTS when I use slot 0).
February 8, 2011 8:06:12 PM

aardwolf said:
I'm running (I know it's a bad idea) 3 DIMMS... slots 1,2,3 (slot 0 is empty; I have to determine if the slot is dusty, bad, or I have a bad DIMM -- memcheck test 5 goes NUTS when I use slot 0).






Have you tried swapping dimms from slot to slot? That would at least rule out a bad dimm. Still having some trouble with Cryis, it won't let me set the resolution any higher than 1024x 768,the options panel just locks up. I have a 1080P monitor,so ant\ything less is a waste of time.
February 8, 2011 10:05:58 PM

odienpooke said:
Have you tried swapping dimms from slot to slot? That would at least rule out a bad dimm. Still having some trouble with Cryis, it won't let me set the resolution any higher than 1024x 768,the options panel just locks up. I have a 1080P monitor,so ant\ything less is a waste of time.


Short answer, yes. But I'm not totally convinced it's not dust as I managed to have issues with the other slots as well. I was hasty the first few swaps, but I started a systemic approach (and wrote down what chips I used in what slots!) and got it up to 3 slots and 3 chips used (12GB). My system's been stable for 2 days now, but some time I'll bite the bullet and finish the diagnostic job with air can in hand and try a working chip in that dimm 0 slot.
February 8, 2011 11:12:15 PM

I know just your talking about, you try everything, and still it doesn't seem like anything works 100% like its suppose to. I'm going to let the dust settle andtry again. Keep me informed.
February 11, 2011 11:29:49 AM

Over the past 2 days, I've finished the methodical approach. I've air-can-cleaned the DIMM slot several times, moved ram around, re-seated the motherboard & replaced all of the standoffs, with numerous memcheck run in-between.

You know what finally fixed it? Setting all of the UEFI settings back to auto for voltage & timings. I'm now suspecting some strange voltage fluctuation that occurs during the use of the PC, due to the automated real-time overclocking that the motherboard's trying to do.

Lesson learned: don't even LOOK at the overclocking settings until 100% of your parts are stable! I was not at all expecting this to be a 'software' issue.

(FYI, I've got a very clean Thermaltake Toughpower 1200W that I trust enough to eliminate that from the issue -- it'd been running for at least a year perfectly fine)
February 11, 2011 4:35:15 PM

To answer the original post: I am continuing to use my ASUS P8P67 Pro until April when the revised chipset is supposed to be distributed. I received an email from Micro Center saying they "stand behind every customer who purchased a system or a motherboard from us that features this chipset", so I assume I will be able to exchange it with little hassle when it becomes available. Right now I am running two hard drives off the SATA III ports and one ODD from SATA II, however, I probably wouldn't be terribly concerned with running HDD's off of the SATA II since the issue reportedly effects less than 10% of boards and is supposed to take up to three years to become a serious issue.

As a side note - hopefully by April ASUS will have fixed the issue where some P8P67's incorrectly identify the memory frequency on cold boot.
February 11, 2011 9:34:46 PM

aardwolf said:
Over the past 2 days, I've finished the methodical approach. I've air-can-cleaned the DIMM slot several times, moved ram around, re-seated the motherboard & replaced all of the standoffs, with numerous memcheck run in-between.

You know what finally fixed it? Setting all of the UEFI settings back to auto for voltage & timings. I'm now suspecting some strange voltage fluctuation that occurs during the use of the PC, due to the automated real-time overclocking that the motherboard's trying to do.

Lesson learned: don't even LOOK at the overclocking settings until 100% of your parts are stable! I was not at all expecting this to be a 'software' issue.

(FYI, I've got a very clean Thermaltake Toughpower 1200W that I trust enough to eliminate that from the issue -- it'd been running for at least a year perfectly fine)



Thanks for the update, I'll keep my eye on the UEFI. Right now I'm doing a clean install of windows. Computer too glichy on startup. Talk later.
February 13, 2011 4:22:23 PM

ArcSec said:


As a side note - hopefully by April ASUS will have fixed the issue where some P8P67's incorrectly identify the memory frequency on cold boot.


That's pretty interesting. I wonder if that was what was causing my RAM failure issues... Is that even with the "MEM OK!" check button on the board?
February 14, 2011 11:07:24 PM

What would happen with me is that on the first cold boot the computer would power up (fans spin, some of the LED's on the board will light) but it does not do anything else. On second boot (or third try) the system would boot up, but when I went into BIOS/UEFI it indicated the incorrect memory frequency, usually at 1066 or sometimes 1333 MHz, on this RAM:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

which is rated at 1600 MHz. I would then either manually set the frequency or switch to XMP profile (either method worked) and reboot and check again. Usually it would take a couple of tries for the system to correctly identify the frequency on boot. I discovered that the most common fix for this problem was to shut down the computer, take out the CMOS battery, and set the CMOS jumper to the clear position for a bit, reset the jumper, install the battery, and boot up.

I should clarify the system would still work with the RAM underclocked it just bothered me that I bought the 1600 RAM and it was being underutilized, and to answer your question it was with the MEM OK button on the board.
February 15, 2011 10:56:37 PM

Now that the RAM's stable, it's not bad. However, I think it's going to take a few firmware revisions before the automated overclocking (is that ever a good idea?) is anywhere near stable. I may try to freeze the RAM settings, and just let the proc go with the TPM, however I think that the automated settings require you to let it handle everything in tandem.

That being said, having the proc have 8 cores at 3.4GHz is no small upgrade from my Q6600 (although I do also have a GTX580 and a big speed bump up for the ram as well, from 1333 to 1600mhz, so I can't attribute all the speed gain to the SB architecture.

Now that it's stable, I'm happy enough to say the upgrade was worth it.
February 18, 2011 11:38:27 PM

My old computer was a Q 6600 also. Had it overclocked to 3.2ghz. When I turned off my new rig last night, everything was great. Turned it on today it wouldn't get past POST. MB gave me a code 59. So I used system restore to get rid of the last windows update. Fingers crossed.
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