Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Core i5 1155 - heat concerns

Last response: in CPUs
Share
May 2, 2011 6:39:08 AM

Hi folks, I'm just trying to get a sense from other 1155 owners on what temps look like.

I basically just built a small profile office computer that I might do some low end gaming on.

Lian-Li Mini ITX case
Asus P8H67 I Extreme Mini ITX Mobo
500gb 6.0sata
i5 2500 3.3ghz 1155 processor
8gb 1333 ram

Basically, I'm just using the onboard video on the 1155 processor. Stock cooler, and no overclocking.

I'm idling around 45c, which sounds hot to begin with. Playing games of almost any kind or putting the processor under heavy load seems to push the temps to about 95 to 97c. That seems really high, but I don't have any experience with these yet.

I thought maybe it was just a bad connection with the heatsink, so I removed it, cleaned off the paste and reapplied artic silver. No change - same temps.

The case is pretty small, but ventilation is good I think. The PSU fan sits above the CPU cooler. Both of which has full vents on 2 sides and partial vent on the top.

Is this really high? I'm not even sure what I can do about it. Would getting a discrete low profile video card possibly bring temps down since the cpu isn't using it any more?
May 2, 2011 7:35:14 AM

First, yes that's really high. You don't want to go past 80C on them and they auto declock at 99C to prevent damage.

Do you have a good amount of exhaust for your system? Seems like you have air flow inside but no way to get the heat out.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b à CPUs
May 2, 2011 7:44:59 AM

I would say its a bit high.But it overall depends also on your room temperature.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 2, 2011 7:56:30 AM

I'd check your fan. Even in a small case, that's a very high temperature for the CPU, especially if it's not OCd. It sounds like the heat isn't getting out of the CPU heatsink.
m
0
l
May 2, 2011 8:08:03 AM

I thought I had good exhaust - I can feel air flowing out of the case. And the psu is dumping the air that comes off the CPU out the back. I originally has the psu fan facing away from the CPU but it didn't seem to make a temp difference.

The case I'm using is this one:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Would changing to this case make the difference?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It certainly would have more flow with the front fan...

And yes that is the motherboard referenced above 
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 2, 2011 8:15:16 AM

Apologies - I meant the fan on the CPU heatsink. With CPU temps that high, the heatsink itself will be heating up through conduction, but it seems to me that there's no convection taking the heat from the heatsink. You have a stock cooler though, so you may need to test this by swapping the whole thing for an aftermarket heatsink / fan.
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 2, 2011 1:02:59 PM

I'd suggest that you ensure that the pushpins for the stock cooler are fully engaged, i.e. the lips are gripping on the underside of the mobo. This was a common installation fault on the 775's and hasn't changed I believe. This would cause the exact error that you are seeing.

m
0
l
May 3, 2011 6:26:10 AM

13th Monkey I think you solved it. I opened the back and looked with a flashlight even though the pins FELT secure. I grabbed both ends and just forced that sucker down and I can see that it definitely was not completely in place.

So I'm now idling at about 38 to 41c, under heavy load it topped out at 79c. That sounds like a pretty reasonable temperature considering I have no case fans, the stock cooler and it's in a cramped area. I think to get it lower I'd have to either install some kind of fan or get another heatsink.
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 3, 2011 8:40:05 AM

they can run a lot cooler than that, you may have inconsistent thermal compound underneath the fan now as a result of it lifting. But with no other fans, thats probably ok, its certainly safe enough however.
m
0
l
May 3, 2011 2:13:51 PM

I had the same problem on an i3 2100 build that you are having.

When I was done with the installation and fired my PC up, it would idle and 40d and then quickly continue to rise up to about 90d and then I would turn it off in fear of it going higher. When I opened the case back up I realized the stock heatsink wasn't attached properly.

After making 100% sure the pins were in fact secure this time, I loaded it back up and it was reaching about 47d idle. After leaving it running for a few hours the temperatures continued to drop and now I idle at around 25d. I'm not an expert on thermal compound, but I suppose it just took awhile to cure and spread properly in between the CPU and heatsink (note I used the stock cooler with the pre-applied paste to the cooler.

If your temps continue to be high, I might suggest taking the heatsink off of the CPU, cleaning both surfaces, and re-applying some new thermal paste. As 13thmonkey mentions, in between the lifting off it may not have a good spread on the CPU and might be causing your high temps.
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 3, 2011 3:06:05 PM

JordoR said:
I had the same problem on an i3 2100 build that you are having.

When I was done with the installation and fired my PC up, it would idle and 40d and then quickly continue to rise up to about 90d and then I would turn it off in fear of it going higher. When I opened the case back up I realized the stock heatsink wasn't attached properly.

After making 100% sure the pins were in fact secure this time, I loaded it back up and it was reaching about 47d idle. After leaving it running for a few hours the temperatures continued to drop and now I idle at around 25d. I'm not an expert on thermal compound, but I suppose it just took awhile to cure and spread properly in between the CPU and heatsink (note I used the stock cooler with the pre-applied paste to the cooler.

If your temps continue to be high, I might suggest taking the heatsink off of the CPU, cleaning both surfaces, and re-applying some new thermal paste. As 13thmonkey mentions, in between the lifting off it may not have a good spread on the CPU and might be causing your high temps.


Thanks for that, I see that they are still using the pushpins then? all the innovative power in the world and they haven't resolved that?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2011 3:19:21 PM

yes, i confirm his experience is that when i used the stock hsf i would still get an idle 40c and 55c for gaming.
What a useless HSF.
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 3, 2011 3:44:00 PM

ghnader hsmithot said:
yes, i confirm his experience is that when i used the stock hsf i would still get an idle 40c and 55c for gaming.
What a useless HSF.


What exactly is wrong with that, the cpu is good for 80C+ so what is the problem? And i doubt you have perfect air temps in case as you have not mentioned them.

The issue i'm talking about it how difficult it is to fit them so that you have good contact, the board normally starts to bend and scare people before its good enough.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2011 3:53:40 PM

13thmonkey said:
What exactly is wrong with that, the cpu is good for 80C+ so what is the problem? And i doubt you have perfect air temps in case as you have not mentioned them.

The issue i'm talking about it how difficult it is to fit them so that you have good contact, the board normally starts to bend and scare people before its good enough.

Ask the other members for your opinion before you attack me and ask them this.
Is the 80c good?
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 3, 2011 4:01:16 PM

What I mean is it can cope with 80C, so why should a stock HSF deliver a lot better than that (if it does you'll pay for it), yours delivers 55C when gaming, so again what makes this a 'useless' HSF?

I remember the days when a highly specialised HSF was required to get anything to overclock at all, and now the stock allows for a 20% boost.

There is nothing wrong with the stock cooler if it is fitted properly for a good 90%+ of users. In this case the OP has no air circulation in the case and so the temps he is getting are great.

And I won't ask other members for my opinion, my opinion is mine, in this case it is backed up by about 15 years of building PC's and assisting people in fixing them in real life and in the forum.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2011 4:06:57 PM

13thmonkey said:
What I mean is it can cope with 80C, so why should a stock HSF deliver a lot better than that (if it does you'll pay for it), yours delivers 55C when gaming, so again what makes this a 'useless' HSF?

I remember the days when a highly specialised HSF was required to get anything to overclock at all, and now the stock allows for a 20% boost.

There is nothing wrong with the stock cooler if it is fitted properly for a good 90%+ of users. In this case the OP has no air circulation in the case and so the temps he is getting are great.

And I won't ask other members for my opinion, my opinion is mine, in this case it is backed up by about 15 years of building PC's and assisting people in fixing them in real life and in the forum.

Sorry.
m
0
l
May 3, 2011 4:44:28 PM

The method I used to apply the compound was the pea-sized dab in the middle and then spread it evenly across with a business card, so I don't think there's an issue in coverage. However there COULD be some bubbles in it when the heat sink kicked up when I was re-pushing the pins, but there's no real way to find out unless I re-do the whole thing again.

But I can confirm some of what the other poster said that I looked at it again about an hour later and it was idling at 33-34c so it definitely went down from the original 40ish and possibly settling into the compound is what did it.

I'm fairly happy with mid to high 70c for load. 90 to 100c was just unacceptable and would have burned the processor out likely. If I really wanted lower temps I'd just go ahead and buy an aftermarket heatsink to make it a little more quiet even.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2011 4:46:15 PM

Actually with those temps i dont think you need to do anything else.Hope you enjoy your cpu.
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 3, 2011 6:10:13 PM

ghnader hsmithot said:
Actually with those temps i dont think you need to do anything else.Hope you enjoy your cpu.


+1 Agree completely, glad idle's down, you ned some airflow in the case to get much better really.
m
0
l
May 3, 2011 6:35:39 PM

Thanks for all the help guys - eased my frustration to know that it was that easy heh.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2011 6:43:08 PM

13thmonkey said:
What exactly is wrong with that, the cpu is good for 80C+ so what is the problem?


The CPU might be capable of operating at that temperature, but I wouldn't say it is desirable. What is wrong with that, is that you'd shorten the life of your component.
m
0
l
a c 80 à CPUs
May 3, 2011 7:57:16 PM

But he wasn't running at 80, he was peaking at 55. so why is that a crap cooler.
m
0
l
May 12, 2011 5:09:54 PM

I'd just like to update this thread. With about a week of use, playing intense games I'm peaking at about 65c. I don't understand what goes into "breaking" in the thermal gel possibly? I can't think of what changes after a week or two of the processor running, but the temps are far cooler than they were when I started.
m
0
l
May 12, 2011 5:21:32 PM

Essentially the thermal compound won't reach it's maximum potential until it has been heated/cooled several times. Unfortunately until it reaches that potential you will be seeing higher temps than the final outcome.

I was doing a bit of reading this morning and apparently it's caused by the thickness of the compound (I believe the suspension fluid in particular). Some thermal compounds will take longer than others to settle in based on the thickness.

Here is some further information on it if you are interested:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=150&Itemid=62&limit=1&limitstart=12
m
0
l
!