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EVGA GTX460: How many connections to the PSU?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 5, 2010 4:18:46 AM

I am awaiting delivery of a Dell Studio XPS 9100 (i7-930 with 9 GB RAM). I have planned all along to swap out the stock card with an EVGA. I need Nvidia for CUDA because I'm a heavy Photoshop user.


I thought that I had researched this fully: I bought an EVGA GeForce GTX460 (1024 MB, GDDR5). It requires a 400W PSU; the 9100 has a 525W PSU, so I assumed I'd be all set.


I just read on the EVGA site this minimum system requirement:

* Two available 6-pin PCI-E power dongles

I haven't received the machine yet, but I have the card and sure enough it has two 6-pin connections. But what I'm confused about is that it also came with two 6-pin to Molex Y-connectors: On one end is the 6-pin and on the other end are two Molexes.

Does this mean that this card requires four connections to the PSU? :o 

I expect to receive the machine on Tuesday and sure hope that this card doesn't turn out to be incompatible with this machine.

Any advice anyone can provide would be most appreciated. And sorry if this is a real novice question: The only cards I've dealt with were GeForce 8600 GTs (nothing as beefy as this). Thanks.

dg
December 5, 2010 4:45:54 AM

The adapter wants two molex connectors to provide the power for one (extra) PCIe power plug.

If your psu has one PCIe power cable, you will use one adapter (and therefore two molex connectors).

If your psu has zero PCIe power cables, you will need four free molex connectors to make two PCIe plugs.
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December 5, 2010 4:51:59 AM

OK--hopefully it'll make sense when I get inside the machine. The other concern I just learned about minutes ago was this MSR:

"Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 24 Amps."

I'm told this is usually printed on the PSU; hopefully it'll be intuitive since I don't know what that means, really.

Thanks.

dg
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December 5, 2010 5:06:53 AM

It means your 12V power must provide a minimum of 24 Amps . . . 12V x 24A = 288W. Dell PSUs are usually well-rated and reliable. A modern 5xx watt psu will power any single vid card PC.

You're right to be alert . . . maybe should have been more so earlier lol . . . but you should be fine.
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December 5, 2010 3:59:36 PM

I googles the Dell 9100 and they can come with some pretty powerful video cards. One option was with an ATI 5970. So you will have 2 six pin connectors. You should be fine. The 460 only requires 2x6 pin connectors...the molex adapters are if you power supply is too old to have the 6 pin connectors. I would also consider using your EVGA step up option within 90 days and upgrading to a gtx580
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December 5, 2010 10:35:15 PM

japps2 said:
I googles the Dell 9100 and they can come with some pretty powerful video cards. One option was with an ATI 5970. So you will have 2 six pin connectors. You should be fine. The 460 only requires 2x6 pin connectors...the molex adapters are if you power supply is too old to have the 6 pin connectors.


Thanks for confirming what I had been led to believe (that the 9100 definitely has sufficient cujones for the gtx460) as well as for answering my question about the two 6-pins connectors. However:

japps2 said:
I would also consider using your EVGA step up option within 90 days and upgrading to a gtx580


I don't think it has quite enough for that, based on this from the gtx580 product page:

Minimum of a 600 Watt power supply. (Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 42 Amps.)

I'd have to swap out the PSU, right?

I question whether it's really worth it for me. I'm a photographer and wanted Nvidia becasue I'm a heavy CS4/Photoshop user. The Nvidia options Dell offered on the 9100 were really anemic (G310?). I don't do any gaming whatsoever. I have nothing against it, I just don't do it. Are those high-end cards primarily for gamers?

Thanks for the tips.

dg
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December 5, 2010 11:26:43 PM

GTX 580 = 452W at the wall, <~400W from the psu. A Dell 520W psu will likely run it and your cpu at max because they are normally well-rated PSUs. But it wouldn't have the reserves we'd like to see.

Anyhow, that's far too powerful a vid card, unless you are gaming at 2560 resolution. Even a 460 is far more than required for just photoshop.
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December 6, 2010 12:13:48 AM

I also do some video editing and expect to be doing more of that in the future, if that makes any difference in the requirements. I do realize that the 460 is more than I need, but I got a great deal on it. What I would have saved going with a lesser card wasn't significant enough to worry about. I had considered having someone do a build for me, but in the end getting a somewhat stripped down 9100 and adding what I want seems like it'll work out fine.

Thanks for your input.

dg
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December 6, 2010 12:20:07 AM

You're welcome - and there's no problem choosing the 460. I love that card. Our job ius simply to let you know its more than you need . . . after that, the choice is yours.

Besides, when you do decide to pick up that special game one day, the 460 will run it well :) 
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December 6, 2010 12:29:33 AM

Quote:
Besides, when you do decide to pick up that special game one day, the 460 will run it well :) 


That's all I'd need: yet another addiction! :pt1cable: 

Thanks.

dg
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December 15, 2010 11:38:33 PM

Best answer selected by dg27.
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a b Î Nvidia
December 16, 2010 6:36:02 AM

This topic has been closed by Maziar
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