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LGA 1366 , LGA 1155 Invest in one now or wait for LGA 2011

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May 4, 2011 10:19:24 AM

I'm currently debating on whether to buy a new pc, and not afriad of investing money into it. But I'm wondering on whether it would be worth investing in LGA 1366 or LGA 1155 with LGA 2011 aproaching or would it just be a failed investment that i will later regret.
Mostly just want high end pc for gaming , but at same time I kinda want to go abit overboard with core componets to build a pc i'm proud of, with high quality and preformance CPU & Motherboard, GPU, Cooling, RAM, and SSD that will hopefully not outdate as soon as I get it.

More about : lga 1366 lga 1155 invest wait lga 2011

a b à CPUs
May 4, 2011 10:22:13 AM

depends on your needs and how long you want to wait.
According to most sources we are looking at a q3 2011 or q4 release of lga 2011.
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May 4, 2011 12:22:19 PM

Personally, I am content to run 1155 paired with p67. Did not care for another 6+months of waiting on a chipset that does not really offer anything overly spectacular. At least not that I have seen.
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a b à CPUs
May 4, 2011 3:25:52 PM

With gaming the primary object, see no real advantage of waiting for Ivybridge - dough quad channel Ram is going to give gaming a big boost, nor the 20% gain in CPU proccessing power.

I think you would be very happy with a SB I5-2500K (could go with the I7-2600K for an extra $100, but no gain for gaming at least for the next couple of years).

Would skip the P67 MB. The Z68 MBs should be out in the next 2 ->3 weeks. Noticed that Australia was listing the UD4,5,7 Gigibyte MBs - No pricing so think it was for advanced orders. Several advantages of Z68 over P67. Do not know what premium over the P67's. The UD7 offers x8,x8,x8,x8 as an option for the X16 slots., But hearing the price tab of around $400 - ouch. Have other reasons for avoiding the P67 MBs that are currently on the market channel.
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a b à CPUs
May 4, 2011 3:46:09 PM

If you wait for the LGA2011, there will be something else to wait for around the corner from that. See what I'm saying? Get something now.

You just have to accept the fact that something better will emerge every year or two and be happy if you can run your favorite games at full tilt details for around 3 years. If you get an 1155 board with a 2600K you'll get great gaming as well as maximize multi-purpose performance.

People will argue you don't need HT for gaming. Well, with the 2600k, you have the option to turn it off, but you can't turn more threads on on a 2500k for things other than gaming (ie audio or video production).

Additionally, BFBC2 will use 8 threads if you have 8 available. Not all games are as advanced with offloading processing tasks to other threads, but aside from being a great game, this is one example of a game that will utilize more threads. Anyone running with 12 threads out there who have seen it using more?
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May 4, 2011 4:15:35 PM

ubercake said:
If you wait for the LGA2011, there will be something else to wait for around the corner from that. See what I'm saying? Get something now.

You just have to accept the fact that something better will emerge every year or two and be happy if you can run your favorite games at full tilt details for around 3 years. If you get an 1155 board with a 2600K you'll get great gaming as well as maximize multi-purpose performance.

People will argue you don't need HT for gaming. Well, with the 2600k, you have the option to turn it off, but you can't turn more threads on on a 2500k for things other than gaming (ie audio or video production).

Additionally, BFBC2 will use 8 threads if you have 8 available. Not all games are as advanced with offloading processing tasks to other threads, but aside from being a great game, this is one example of a game that will utilize more threads. Anyone running with 12 threads out there who have seen it using more?


What he said. There is no need to wait! I'm building a MONSTER 2600k build in the next few weeks. There is no point in waiting, something else is indeed ALWAYS around the corner. Sandybridge is definitely worth it. The 2600k is basically the best CPU out there right now. Buy it and enjoy it.
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a b à CPUs
May 4, 2011 4:32:45 PM

I think with P68 and the ability to use the EUs for encoding, there's really no reason to wait. If you absolutely want more PCIe bandwidth you can just get one of the $350 NF200 equipped mobos, but honestly even 8x/8x is pretty good, especially if you plan to push high resolutions.
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May 9, 2011 8:00:19 AM

Best answer selected by kaboose.
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May 11, 2011 10:42:31 PM

RetiredChief said:
With gaming the primary object, see no real advantage of waiting for Ivybridge - dough quad channel Ram is going to give gaming a big boost, nor the 20% gain in CPU proccessing power.


It's my understanding that Ivy Bridge is the Tick (die shrink) of Sandy Bridge, which is unrelated to LGA 2011. I could be wrong.

Yes, something better will always come out, but the point in waiting isn't to get the "best ever"; it's to maximize ROI for both new and *existing* systems. For example, I could replace my Q9550 with a 2600k today, but unless I'm experiencing a slowdown now for gaming (and I'm not) or programming (not exactly a CPU-limited task), then there will be no benefit in upgrading right now.

On the other hand, if I wait for LGA 2011, not only might there be software like BF3 to take advantage of it (and truly punish my existing system), the LGA 2011-based CPU will likely last longer in terms of both usability in its at-purchase state and (barring another immediate socket change) upgradeability with future CPUs.

At the same time, I think it's very unlikely that LGA 1155 will ever see >4 cores.
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a c 162 à CPUs
May 12, 2011 5:02:02 PM

This topic has been closed by SAINT19
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