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Digital rec for film holdout

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Anonymous
January 31, 2005 10:00:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've been a devotee of the Olympus 35mm system since the late 1970s, and
have a not insubstantial investment in bodies, lenses, motor drives, and
other Olypus paraphernaila. I do my own B&W darkroom work, and my color
work isn't generally time sensoitive, so sending slides to a lab isn't a
big inconvenience. I primarily shoot landscapes and other "fine art"
subjects, although I also occasionally shoot sports on a freelance basis.

So film has served me well.

That said, I've reached the point where he temptation is just too great
to give digital a serious shot. The images my wife and my friends bring
me from their consumer digitals and modern printing do seem to make
digital a viable option for me.

So I'm looking for a professional quality digital body.

My first consideration is that my investment in Olympus, and 25+ years of
using Olympus equipment. If I opted for the E-1, I can get an adaptor
that will let me use my existing lenses in manual focus mode. This could
be a major issue with focal lenths I only use for special projects - i.e.
it'd be great if I didn't have to replace my 300/2.8, my macro lenses, or
my fisheyes.

But I'm willing to go to another brand if there are substantial
advantages.

What I want:

1) Professional line with wide range of accessories and lenses available
2) Rugged and reasonably weatherproof (should be able to withstand light
rain, heat amd cold, and minor shocks)
3) Multiple exposure & focus modes, including full manual
4) Good low light performance (need not be extreme, but at least
comparable to ASA 800 film)
5) Fast performance for street shooting, sports, and nature shots
6) Bright viewfinder with adjustable diopter for 40 yr old eyes.

I'm willing to spend between $1000-2000 initially, but expect that amount
to cover body, extra memory card, and either primes or a fast zoom lens
to cover a range equivalent to 24-100 on a 35mm.
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 10:00:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 31 Jan 2005 19:00:31 GMT, Barry Bean <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote:

snipped
>
>What I want:
>
>1) Professional line with wide range of accessories and lenses available
>2) Rugged and reasonably weatherproof (should be able to withstand light
>rain, heat amd cold, and minor shocks)
>3) Multiple exposure & focus modes, including full manual
>4) Good low light performance (need not be extreme, but at least
>comparable to ASA 800 film)
>5) Fast performance for street shooting, sports, and nature shots
>6) Bright viewfinder with adjustable diopter for 40 yr old eyes.
>
>I'm willing to spend between $1000-2000 initially, but expect that amount
>to cover body, extra memory card, and either primes or a fast zoom lens
>to cover a range equivalent to 24-100 on a 35mm.

I went through this process for several months and am going with a
Canon 20D equipped with the EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Wide Angle
Zoom. The memory cards will take you some over you 2k number but
worth it.
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Anonymous
January 31, 2005 10:28:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Xns95EF845E7C988eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17>,
Barry Bean <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote:

>What I want:
>
>1) Professional line with wide range of accessories and lenses available

You may want to look elsewhere than Olympus for that then. The native lens
range for their DSLRs is a little on the small size.

>2) Rugged and reasonably weatherproof (should be able to withstand light
>rain, heat amd cold, and minor shocks)

Most DSLRs should serve you well in this regard, as long as your definition
of "light" isn't dramatically differemt to mine. I took a "consumer" DSLR
(old EOS D30) into a rainforest and it was fine, for example.

>3) Multiple exposure & focus modes, including full manual

It doesn't really make sense for a DSLR to offer multiple exposure, and none
do. You do this yourself in Photoshop later. They all offer manual focusing.

>4) Good low light performance (need not be extreme, but at least
>comparable to ASA 800 film)

I don't think any of them, with the possible execption of the Sigmas, are as
bad as 800ISO film in low light. This is an area where digital SLRs
demonstrate dramatic superiority over 35mm film.

>5) Fast performance for street shooting, sports, and nature shots

Most of the modern DSLRs should do fine here. Check out the reviews on
www.dpreview.com for comparisons in this area.

>6) Bright viewfinder with adjustable diopter for 40 yr old eyes.

None of them are spectacularly good, unless you go for the really high end
stuff. Probably best to look through a few in shops and see what you're
comfortable with. Obviously, you'll get a brighter image with faster lenses
mounted, and the kit lenses that often accompany these cameras are usually a
bit slow.

>I'm willing to spend between $1000-2000 initially, but expect that amount
>to cover body, extra memory card, and either primes or a fast zoom lens
>to cover a range equivalent to 24-100 on a 35mm.

That's a bit tight, money wise. Perhaps look at the Canon EOS 300D, Nikon
D70, Pentax *ist DS and the Olympus E300.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 10:28:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>3) Multiple exposure & focus modes, including full manual
>
> It doesn't really make sense for a DSLR to offer multiple exposure, and
> none
> do. You do this yourself in Photoshop later. They all offer manual
> focusing.
>

My D70 has bracketing, which I assume would equate to multiple exposure.
You set it to bracket, and then take three shots, or shoot in continuous
mode. I realize from the thread that's not exactly what the poster was
looking for, but it does exist.
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 1:49:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Brown <cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com> wrote in
news:q4d2d2-n16.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org:

> In article <Xns95EF845E7C988eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17>,
> Barry Bean <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote:

>>3) Multiple exposure & focus modes, including full manual
>
> It doesn't really make sense for a DSLR to offer multiple exposure,
> and none do. You do this yourself in Photoshop later. They all offer
> manual focusing.

Please note that when I wrote "multiple exposure and focus modes, including
full manual", I meant that autoexposure should have more than one mode
(i.e. spot, multispot, area, etc), and I should also be able to manualy
set exposure.

But thanks for the other suggestions. I'll check out www.dpreview.com
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 12:29:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Xns95EFAB34C5ADDeatmorecotton@207.14.113.17>,
Barry Bean <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote:
>Chris Brown <cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com> wrote in
>news:q4d2d2-n16.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org:
>
>> In article <Xns95EF845E7C988eatmorecotton@207.14.113.17>,
>> Barry Bean <bbbean@beancotton.com> wrote:
>
>>>3) Multiple exposure & focus modes, including full manual
>>
>> It doesn't really make sense for a DSLR to offer multiple exposure,
>> and none do. You do this yourself in Photoshop later. They all offer
>> manual focusing.
>
>Please note that when I wrote "multiple exposure and focus modes, including
>full manual", I meant that autoexposure should have more than one mode
>(i.e. spot, multispot, area, etc), and I should also be able to manualy
>set exposure.

Ah, I see. Yes, most DSLRs have a variety of metering modes, and support
fully manual exposure.
!