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Ram drives as boot drives?

Last response: in Memory
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January 8, 2012 4:47:58 AM

Memory is dirt cheap these days and looking to become even cheaper. An 8gig stick can be bought off newegg for 50$.
With that in mind, I'd like to just hear the general considerations and opinions of the enthusiast community on ram drives and their practicality now and in the future as os storage.

More about : ram drives boot drives

a b } Memory
January 8, 2012 5:11:23 AM

Ram drives? Do you mean thumb drives?
a b } Memory
January 8, 2012 5:35:37 AM

I'm pretty sure he means a ram drive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAM_disk

There are several issue with using one for an OS. Remember that nothing stays in memory when the computer is off. And ram doesn't have a battery option. You could just leave your computer on all the time, but thats another issue. That is you need an OS already installed inorder to use these software programs. I'm not sure how to dual boot in this manor as every time you reboot to load the ram drive OS, you'll lose it again.

Gigabyte did come out with that PCI based ram drive. But not all boards support booting from PCI. And they only developed one with SATAI/DDR support so the speeds are slow compared to modern SSDs. As an OS drive its not currently a good idea.
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a b } Memory
January 8, 2012 11:33:27 PM

4745454b said:
I'm pretty sure he means a ram drive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAM_disk

There are several issue with using one for an OS. Remember that nothing stays in memory when the computer is off. And ram doesn't have a battery option. You could just leave your computer on all the time, but thats another issue. That is you need an OS already installed inorder to use these software programs. I'm not sure how to dual boot in this manor as every time you reboot to load the ram drive OS, you'll lose it again.

Gigabyte did come out with that PCI based ram drive. But not all boards support booting from PCI. And they only developed one with SATAI/DDR support so the speeds are slow compared to modern SSDs. As an OS drive its not currently a good idea.


Cool, thanks for the clarification.
Yeah, as far as I know the SSD boot drive/mechanical data drive is still the best option for desktop users. The fastest available for consumers I believe would be a revo drive solution, but those are quite out of reach for most of us. If someone were to give me one for my next build, however...
a b } Memory
January 9, 2012 3:47:55 AM

A ram disk is great if you need that kind of speed. But I'd imagine as a boot disk it would be difficult. Not impossible mind you as there are boards out there that can boot from a PCI/PCIe slot. But then you'll need something like Gigabytes idrive thing.
!