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Windows is shutting down during games!

Last response: in Systems
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February 6, 2011 4:25:11 PM

Hello, I have just bought a new PC:

Asus P7P55D

Corsair 8GB (2x4096MB) 1600MHz XMS3

Intel Core i5 760, 2.8GHz

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 560 Ti OC 1GB

Corsair VX 550W

Windows 7.

The thing is that after playing about 5-10 minutes in any game, the computer shuts off. I have checked the temperature, and the cpu and gpu seems to be around 50 C (checked this after one time playing Starcraft 2 with max graphics, no lag at all).
I tried switch the graphics card to an ATI 5850 and it still does not work. I have updated the motherboard, BIOS, graphic card and Windows. I tried to shut of the function that automatically restarts the system if there is a failure, and it still restarts, does not give me a message, bluescreen or anything like that.

One more thing... When the computer starts up again and ask me if I want to start the system in safe mode, and still starts it in normal mode, it shuts off directly when windows has loaded. So I first need to load in safe mode, and then Im able to restart and use it in normal mode.

The games doesnt lag anything at all, isnt that an indicator that the temperature is fine?

What more can I do to fix my problem...?

Edit: The only games Ive tried so far is Mass Effect 2 and Starcraft 2

More about : windows shutting games

February 6, 2011 4:53:37 PM

1. Since ya just bought "it", (rather than bought the individual components), it's under warranty .... let whomever build it solve ya problem.

2. If you built it ....

a) what does event viewer say ?

b) what happens when ya run OCCT GPU / CPU tests ?

c) does it pass an overnight run of memtest ?

3. Is this the restart procedure you turned off ?
http://pcsupport.about.com/od/windows7/ht/automatic-res...




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February 6, 2011 5:22:24 PM

I have a feeling its the PSU, Nvidia are power Hungry cards.
From articles i have read the gtx 560 consumes 350-400W, so thats like 80% of the output.
Assuming the PSU has 80% efficiency, ur GPU has just eaten it all. So just change your PSu, i suggest 650-700W
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February 6, 2011 5:47:48 PM

Does the Windows Event log show anything?
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February 6, 2011 5:57:21 PM

Well, I have now checked my event viewer, and the event ID is 41, which seem to be hard tracking down.
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February 6, 2011 6:03:33 PM

Is that all it says? 41?
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February 6, 2011 6:10:37 PM

Microsoft defines the error as:

Log Name: System
Source: Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power
Event ID: 41
Level: Critical
Description:
The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly.


I would be looking at hardware, especially the power supply. My first knee-jerk would be to say the PSU does not have enough watts. have to look at the build. Some component could be going way over-watt. The highest power user is usually the graphics card. Do you have any way to eliminate that by swapping?

Of course this is a purchased system. Probably should let the manufacturer/seller diagnose and repair.
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February 6, 2011 6:12:44 PM

loukur said:
Is that all it says? 41?

It says a lot of things, but that is the only critical error... if you wondered more specifically what event ID 41 says, it is:

"The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly."
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February 6, 2011 6:29:04 PM

Isnt there a more secure way knowing my PSU is too weak? I mean,,, I tried running 3dmark 11, and it didn't shut down, shouldn't the power supply be extra important in that case? Or maybe its more complicated than that..
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February 6, 2011 6:30:08 PM

The text you found is just the definition of event id 41.

Your PSU is 550 watts, and 80% of that is 440. I did a swag add up of your parts and got 401 watts. That would be a rough estimate of 39 watts left over. Overclocking that CPU could raise its power needs by 38 watts. Also, the graphics card will draw more power as you play games.

Are you overclocking? Since you are watching temp a lot, I am guessing you are. I don't think you have enough PSU for overclocking.
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February 6, 2011 6:40:39 PM

loukur said:
The text you found is just the definition of event id 41.

Your PSU is 550 watts, and 80% of that is 440. I did a swag add up of your parts and got 401 watts. That would be a rough estimate of 39 watts left over. Overclocking that CPU could raise its power needs by 38 watts. Also, the graphics card will draw more power as you play games.

Are you overclocking? Since you are watching temp a lot, I am guessing you are. I don't think you have enough PSU for overclocking.

No, I am not overclocking.
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February 6, 2011 7:02:47 PM

Make sure all of your drivers are updated. I have had alot of trouble with the realtek audio drivers lately so I dont even use them, I use the drivers Win7 installs.

Your PSU should be more the enough to run your setup, the PSU could still be faulty, it happens I dont care what psu brand it is. If you can get your hands on another psu try that.
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February 7, 2011 11:22:51 AM

I have now been running the program memtest over night. I used 3 copies of the program, where I in two programs tested 2gb, and 1gb in the last one. In the morning the computer had a bluescreen and now I dont know if this really is the error. Can I check it somewhere? I checked in event viewer and I got a memory dump file, maybe that is the only relevant information I need... Should I post the .dmp file?

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February 7, 2011 1:17:41 PM

The BSOD will usually point to a device. The first 2 characters of the Hex code are the most important. What was the BSOD code (32 bytes if I recall.)
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February 7, 2011 1:27:27 PM

Not sure what you mean by 3 copies of memtest.
Memtest is run off a bootable USB or CD or floppy, not in windows.

If the PC is BSODing during memtest then you've got a hardware issue. As stated already, go get another PSU and try that.

In addition, run memtest and watch it. If you're getting errors in it then RAM is likely cause for your issues.

Also, since this is prebuilt why aren't you just talking with the company?
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February 7, 2011 2:13:43 PM

loukur said:
The BSOD will usually point to a device. The first 2 characters of the Hex code are the most important. What was the BSOD code (32 bytes if I recall.)

I dont know exactly where I can find the BSOD code, if you mean the information I got from the actual BSOD, I didnt note it down (stupid of me maybe), but I found this however in the event viewer:

"The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck. The bugcheck was: 0x000000a0 (0x000000000000000b, 0x000000017fe8a000, 0x0000000000000003, 0x000000004bdbd000). A dump was saved in: C:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP. Report Id: 020711-23961-01."

Is that what you mean?
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February 7, 2011 2:16:57 PM

banthracis said:
Not sure what you mean by 3 copies of memtest.
Memtest is run off a bootable USB or CD or floppy, not in windows.

If the PC is BSODing during memtest then you've got a hardware issue. As stated already, go get another PSU and try that.

In addition, run memtest and watch it. If you're getting errors in it then RAM is likely cause for your issues.

Also, since this is prebuilt why aren't you just talking with the company?

You are right, it wasnt memtest86 which everyone seem to be talking about, it was a test that ran inside the OS.

Its not prebuilt, I built it myself... Im not in the wrong part of the forum or anything, am I?
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February 7, 2011 2:32:08 PM

No, you're in right section, you just never answered Jack's question as to whether you meant you build it yourself or it was bought.

Go try running memtest86 http://www.memtest.org/ and see what happens.

Also make sure RAM timings and voltage are set in BIOS to manf specs.
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February 7, 2011 2:32:16 PM

rwoz said:
I dont know exactly where I can find the BSOD code, if you mean the information I got from the actual BSOD, I didnt note it down (stupid of me maybe), but I found this however in the event viewer:

"The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck. The bugcheck was: 0x000000a0 (0x000000000000000b, 0x000000017fe8a000, 0x0000000000000003, 0x000000004bdbd000). A dump was saved in: C:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP. Report Id: 020711-23961-01."

Is that what you mean?



Yes, that's what I meant. That error is pointing at a device or driver. Need to decode a bit further, but Bug Check 0xA means: IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL. Microsoft "If you have received a blue screen error, or stop code, the computer has shut down abruptly to protect itself from data loss. A hardware device, its driver, or related software might have caused this error" Great, so it's something broke in the computer. Wow, I never would have guessed.

The parameters are supposed to be thus:
Parameter Description
1 Memory referenced
2 IRQL at time of reference
3 0: Read or 1: Write
4 Address which referenced memory

They aren't. Second parameter is not an IRQ. There is no parameter showing 0 or 1 for Read or Write. There is an example of what an 0x0A should look like here http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314063. Your example looks nothing like that. I am not sure how to decode what you have posted. Maybe post your MEMORY.DMP and as much detail from the event view as relatee to the same exact timeframe.




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February 7, 2011 2:53:32 PM

I'm not a big fan of error codes, they often confuse more than they help.

I remember one time I got a "clock interrupt not received error" and CPU associated codes and in the end it turned out it was a software issue with Everest causing BSOD after installing a second GPU.

That one drove me crazy for nearly a week with hardware swaps in of good parts, and swapping our parts into other PC's showing no issues.
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February 7, 2011 2:56:48 PM

banthracis said:
I'm not a big fan of error codes, they often confuse more than they help.

I remember one time I got a "clock interrupt not received error" and CPU associated codes and in the end it turned out it was a software issue with Everest causing BSOD after installing a second GPU.

That one drove me crazy for nearly a week with hardware swaps in of good parts, and swapping our parts into other PC's showing no issues.



Okay, what is your suggestion for diagnosing and repairing?
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February 7, 2011 5:10:19 PM

Depends on the situation really. In the OP's case likely candidates are RAM and PSU. So swapping/testing those is the best first step.

If no boot, then beep codes are very helpful.

Some other general help

Always go through our excellent sticky first if it's a new build or you've made any hardware changes.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...

Memtest can eliminate RAM.
Prime 95 CPU
Furmark GPU

Using safe mode is an easy way to eliminate drivers as an issue though it gets a bit more difficult to diagnose other software issues/conflicts.

The easiest way to eliminate software completely is to have a fully functional OS image somewhere to boot off of and try testing.

Diagnosing Hardware issues outside CPU/GPU/RAm comes down to trial and error really. Swap in either known working parts, or put current parts in a known working PC.
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February 7, 2011 7:54:23 PM

I now remember one thing,,, I dont think my motherboard is making any startup beepsound. Isnt that something bad
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February 7, 2011 8:17:33 PM

Do you have a case speaker installed? Many cases these days don't come with one by default (cheap ass companies =P)
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February 7, 2011 8:28:37 PM

You are right, I actually found something which I think is a speaker, it came with the case. Well, I guess I then only can expect one single beep...
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February 7, 2011 9:06:44 PM

I disagree about error telemetry being misleading. In rare cases that is true. In most cases it points in the right direction.

rwoz, do you plan to post anything more on the windows error you are getting?
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February 7, 2011 9:17:32 PM

If I have anymore questions then yes, I will. I guess some people would be glad if I posted how I solved it, when that happens.
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February 8, 2011 10:54:44 AM

I have now tried something new,,, I did as you said, I looked up the memory timing, and it was wrong. The tRAS digit was set to 24 when it was suppost to be set to 27 according to the website I bought the memory from. It didnt solve my problem, but made it different,,, now instead of just turning off, it completely freeze and I have to manually restart the computer. Does this mean the PSU is clear?

I also saw that the voltage should be 1.65, in bios there were some DRAM voltage setting that were around 1.53 +- 0,01 (something like this, the voltage changed a little all the time), I should change this as well?

btw, I changed my OS to xp pro x64, it was the same problem before I changed the timing.
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February 8, 2011 11:29:48 AM

Set mem timings to defaults why troubleshooting.....

Lst thing you need is overclocked mem issues while probably troubleshooting a PSU issue...
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February 8, 2011 11:45:37 AM

mdd1963 said:
Set mem timings to defaults why troubleshooting.....

Lst thing you need is overclocked mem issues while probably troubleshooting a PSU issue...

Well, what is the default memory settings then? Is it what the manufacturer says it is, or is it the preset values in bios?

I changed the dram voltage to 1.65, now its back to the same old problem again...
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February 8, 2011 1:13:41 PM

The default setting are listed on the RAM package you buy, and on the tech specs (usually) from website you got them from.

Can also look up model number and grab it off manf website.
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