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Computer wont boot with aftermarket cooler

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May 7, 2011 4:50:37 PM

Hi I Have an Asus M4A79XTD EVO mobo and a Phenom II X4 965 BE (140W version), and I'm trying to get an aftermarket cooler on it. The stock cooler averages well over 65 on load, so I bought a Core Contact Freezer for it. The CCF worked well for a couple of weeks, then I started getting random crashes and reboots. It got to the point that the computer wouldn't boot at all, just power the fans up and wouldn't POST. If I reseated the CPU and popped the stock cooler back on, the computer would work fine, just too hot. I had an Old Scythe Kama Angle lying around and tried to install it. The computer wont boot with it installed either. Both of these coolers use the stock AMD mounting bracket, so there's no back-plate to cause shorts or anything. I have no idea why this is happening, and I'm not sure what the course of action should be. I was told on another forum to break down and buy a corsair h50 so I wouldn't have a big, top-heavy cooler putting stress on my mobo, but I'd have to buy a new case if I did that because My 120mm exhaust fan grill is too close to my PSU to fit the radiator. If I'm going to spend so much money on that, I'd like to make sure there isn't some other problem with my mobo or processor first....
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May 7, 2011 5:55:47 PM

You could always try laying your PC on its side to change the strain on your motherboard to see if this is the cause and not something else.
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May 7, 2011 8:52:42 PM

I have done this. with the CCF it worked temporarily when the computer was horizontal. then I tried to orient the computer vertically again while it was running and it froze, shut down and refused to boot. I can't it to boot in any position without the stock cooler now.
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May 7, 2011 8:54:53 PM

your aftermarket cooler might not be detected by the mobo.Thats my take.Also you could look at other hardware.
Why not use the stock cooler for a little while longer see if it still hangs.
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May 7, 2011 9:04:24 PM

running the processor over 60c consistently wont ruin it?
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May 7, 2011 9:11:59 PM

what??
Stock coolers arent that bad.Idle should be around 28~39 depending on your room temps.
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Best solution

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May 7, 2011 9:15:50 PM

60-70 is totally fine, by the way. That's around the temperature I'd expect with just about any cooler. It doesn't get dangerous even into the 100s. If you're not crashing with the stock cooler, just stick with it.
Incidentally, it seems like you've got problems more inherent than your cooler. No cooler should have an effect on your machine besides the temperature. It may be your motherboard.
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May 7, 2011 9:16:44 PM

My stock cooler, with a 92mm case fan blowing directly into it, idles around 48c....playing games I usually gets well into the 60s...
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May 7, 2011 9:17:05 PM

kajabla said:
60-70 is totally fine, by the way. That's around the temperature I'd expect with just about any cooler. It doesn't get dangerous even into the 100s. If you're not crashing with the stock cooler, just stick with it.
Incidentally, it seems like you've got problems more inherent than your cooler. No cooler should have an effect on your machine besides the temperature. It may be your motherboard.

I really disagree with your opinion.
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May 7, 2011 9:19:22 PM

dopaminefix said:
My stock cooler, with a 92mm case fan blowing directly into it, idles around 48c....playing games I usually gets well into the 60s...

Sounds ok.Playing games can take some heat.
But even for playing games i go for 44~52c in my system with stock cooler.A bit too high for you.
What is your room temps.
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May 7, 2011 9:20:56 PM

Hmm....I was worried it was the motherboard. I guess I could get the same one and that way I don't have to worry about windows and the drivers...
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May 7, 2011 9:22:10 PM

room temps are normal...we have AC
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May 7, 2011 9:24:54 PM

dopaminefix said:
Hmm....I was worried it was the motherboard. I guess I could get the same one and that way I don't have to worry about windows and the drivers...

It could be the mobo.
My thought was that it was another problem other than your aftermarket hsf.
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May 7, 2011 9:52:14 PM

I think I'll just keep using it as is and see how the motherboard acts....thanks everyone
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May 7, 2011 9:52:38 PM

Best answer selected by dopaminefix.
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May 8, 2011 12:44:12 AM

I have to say that I, too, am at odds with the Best Answer here.

According to AMD, the TjMax for the 965 BE 140W version is 62 degrees C. Temps over that are hotter than your processor was designed for and you risk damaging it. I'm not saying that it would die on you the moment you go over 62 and it would likely run stable at or around 70, but those temps are not good for the long-term lifespan of your CPU. Generally, if you breach the TjMax you computer will shut itself off to avert damage the CPU. Different processors have their own TjMax, there is no standard, but for your CPU, you want temps around 50-58 (max!) under heavy loads like gaming or encoding. Any higher and you are risking physical damage and are shortening your CPU's lifespan. If you ever got your CPU into the 100's, you couldn't expect to have it for too much longer. In fact, I'm sure your computer would shut down before your CPU got close to 100 degrees C. A video card's GPU, for example, can take much higher temps and can get into the 70s and 80s and such just fine, but not a CPU. If you're running over the TjMax at load with your current CPU cooler, I'd recommend getting a new one that can facilitate much lower temps as soon as you can. So, that's my Spiel.

http://products.amd.com/en-us/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=...
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May 8, 2011 1:01:50 AM

I did. that's the problem...I've tried two different large, tower-heatpipe type coolers and the computer wont POST with either one installed
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May 8, 2011 3:13:06 AM

Oh, now I've found that rating. Huh. I guess I was going on my experience with both Intel chips and graphics cards, both of which can get very hot. Sorry about the incorrect assumption.
However, a couple of degrees over shouldn't hurt. If the lifespan of the processor is shortened, it won't matter, and here's why: the chip will be long obsolete before it "wears out." If the lifespan is shortened to, say, ten years (which is not unreasonable; think of all the ancient dells puttering along at speeds we now consider slow), you'll still have long upgraded. When have you ever heard of an old computer actually ceasing to work, dying of old age? It seems like you keep relatively on top of the gaming curve, so you'll be done with this thing before aging becomes a problem.
If the heat really becomes dangerous to the processor, which I guess 90c or perhaps even 70c will do (sorry again) then it will shut itself down. The worst that can happen is that you get a couple of bluescreens and are forced to deal with it by getting a new mobo or cooler. It does seem to me like the motherboard would be the problem.
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May 8, 2011 3:18:35 AM

agabougi said:
I have to say that I, too, am at odds with the Best Answer here.

According to AMD, the TjMax for the 965 BE 140W version is 62 degrees C. Temps over that are hotter than your processor was designed for and you risk damaging it. I'm not saying that it would die on you the moment you go over 62 and it would likely run stable at or around 70, but those temps are not good for the long-term lifespan of your CPU. Generally, if you breach the TjMax you computer will shut itself off to avert damage the CPU. Different processors have their own TjMax, there is no standard, but for your CPU, you want temps around 50-58 (max!) under heavy loads like gaming or encoding. Any higher and you are risking physical damage and are shortening your CPU's lifespan. If you ever got your CPU into the 100's, you couldn't expect to have it for too much longer. In fact, I'm sure your computer would shut down before your CPU got close to 100 degrees C. A video card's GPU, for example, can take much higher temps and can get into the 70s and 80s and such just fine, but not a CPU. If you're running over the TjMax at load with your current CPU cooler, I'd recommend getting a new one that can facilitate much lower temps as soon as you can. So, that's my Spiel.

http://products.amd.com/en-us/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=...

TJmax is when a specific temperature has reached it prepares to undervolt and underclock itself.Such that when AMD cpus has reached 62 degrees it lessens its vcore so that it cools down.
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May 8, 2011 3:27:48 AM

kajabla said:
Oh, now I've found that rating. Huh. I guess I was going on my experience with both Intel chips and graphics cards, both of which can get very hot. Sorry about the incorrect assumption.
However, a couple of degrees over shouldn't hurt. If the lifespan of the processor is shortened, it won't matter, and here's why: the chip will be long obsolete before it "wears out." If the lifespan is shortened to, say, ten years (which is not unreasonable; think of all the ancient dells puttering along at speeds we now consider slow), you'll still have long upgraded. When have you ever heard of an old computer actually ceasing to work, dying of old age? It seems like you keep relatively on top of the gaming curve, so you'll be done with this thing before aging becomes a problem.
If the heat really becomes dangerous to the processor, which I guess 90c or perhaps even 70c will do (sorry again) then it will shut itself down. The worst that can happen is that you get a couple of bluescreens and are forced to deal with it by getting a new mobo or cooler. It does seem to me like the motherboard would be the problem.

My intel i7 2600k oc to 4.5ghz doesnt even reach 53at load.
Please check your cooling devices and equipment.
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May 8, 2011 3:31:06 AM

I didn't say *do*, I said *can*. My gtx 460 doesn't hit 60c, but can get into the 90s without damage.
Intel's 2600k ceiling is 72.6 tcase, which I believe would be several (5-10) degrees hotter translated into a max tJ.
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May 8, 2011 3:33:08 AM

And also, dopamine:
If you haven't yet, BACK UP YOUR DATA! Regardless of what's wrong with your computer or how to fix it, or if the problem will manifest itself in the loss of your data (this kind of thing probably won't) you really don't want to have to start from scratch if the worst happens.
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