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I7 2600k RAM compatibility question

Last response: in CPUs
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May 10, 2011 4:42:34 PM

Hi,

I recently ordered a new MOBO, RAM, and CPU but just read in another forum that you need to also check the CPU specs and verify that the RAM you get is compatible. I thought this was only applicable to motherboards but I guess I learned something new.

The following was purchased:

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor

MEMORY: Kingston HyperX 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model KHX1600C9D3K2/8GX (purchased 16 gigs total)

MOTHERBOARD: ASRock P67 EXTREME4 (B3) LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

The motherboard and RAM are compatible, however, I noticed that this specific processor only shows to be compatible with DDR3 1333 and less. My question is, since I got the DDR3 1600, will the CPU only see it as 1333 or will it not work at all, or even worse, randomly crash all the time? The specs also show that both the CPU and MOBO can handle 32Gb RAM so I should be okay there.

Any help is greatly appreciated.
a b à CPUs
May 10, 2011 4:51:08 PM

it would work.
Heck the i7 would support ddr3 2600.
May 10, 2011 5:02:55 PM

I wonder why Intel listed it with maximum of ddr3 1333.

From Intel's website:

Memory Specifications
Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type) 32 GB
Memory Types DDR3-1066/1333
# of Memory Channels 2
Max Memory Bandwidth 21 GB/s
ECC Memory Supported No

The above is what I'm referring to, however I agree, you would think an i7 could handle 2600.


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May 10, 2011 5:12:43 PM

i know people use their sandy bridge stuff with fast ram. you probably don't need it, though.
a b à CPUs
May 10, 2011 5:15:03 PM

the 2600k would support 1333mt/s OUT OF BOX.
In other words you need to overclock the ram.

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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2011 5:16:15 PM
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In otherwords by default even though you have ddr3 2600.It would still be listed as 1333mt/s.You need to OC that ram to use full potential.
Toms used ddr3 2133
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/sandy-bridge-overcl...
May 10, 2011 5:19:35 PM

kajabla said:
i know people use their sandy bridge stuff with fast ram. you probably don't need it, though.


I was attracted more to the pricing and brand of this RAM and based my final decision to purchase on motherboard compatibility. Kind of average speed for what's out there now, but not too worried about that so much.
May 10, 2011 5:33:13 PM

ghnader hsmithot said:
In otherwords by default even though you have ddr3 2600.It would still be listed as 1333mt/s.You need to OC that ram to use full potential.
Toms used ddr3 2133
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/sandy-bridge-overcl...


Ghnader, it was actually ddr3 1600 however I think I understand what you're saying. Even though it says 1600, it actually needs to be overclocked to 1600 to obtain these speeds? Is that what you mean?

Only reason why I am so concerned about this is that I just ordered it and if someone tells me that it's incompatible I will just RMA and purchase 1333 ram.
May 10, 2011 5:33:16 PM

jmcb1b said:
I wonder why Intel listed it with maximum of ddr3 1333.

From Intel's website:

Memory Specifications
Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type) 32 GB
Memory Types DDR3-1066/1333
# of Memory Channels 2
Max Memory Bandwidth 21 GB/s
ECC Memory Supported No

The above is what I'm referring to, however I agree, you would think an i7 could handle 2600.


There are a number of reasons why they do this. Most reasons can be attributed to it being better for Intel and manufacturers to offer less officially supported and certified options; and when you start getting to the "extreme" levels of performance they hedge their bets, as it were, on what their binning process will yield. They leave it to 3rd parties to push performance and it works well for them.
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May 10, 2011 5:34:27 PM

jmcb1b said:
Ghnader, it was actually ddr3 1600 however I think I understand what you're saying. Even though it says 1600, it actually needs to be overclocked to 1600 to obtain these speeds? Is that what you mean?

Only reason why I am so concerned about this is that I just ordered it and if someone tells me that it's incompatible I will just RMA and purchase 1333 ram.

YES!!
May 10, 2011 6:39:21 PM

I do think that the 1600 speed is worth the price, and makes a difference, but aside from that, it is supporter, but you must 'overclock' the RAM to the rated frequency for it to run at 1600Mhz, this is a simple case of going into your bios and setting the ram frequency to the rated value.
May 10, 2011 6:41:42 PM

Wampbit said:
I do think that the 1600 speed is worth the price, and makes a difference, but aside from that, it is supporter, but you must 'overclock' the RAM to the rated frequency for it to run at 1600Mhz, this is a simple case of going into your bios and setting the ram frequency to the rated value.



Thanks, that is the first thing that I will do when I get this together.
May 11, 2011 12:49:00 PM

Best answer selected by jmcb1b.
a b à CPUs
May 11, 2011 6:59:06 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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