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Usb 3.0 flash drives and readyboost

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May 13, 2011 6:44:40 AM

Does anyone know if ReadyBoost is going to be useful in a HP Pavlion laptop running 64 bit Win7? I've maxed out the dv7's RAM at 8GB and have a Kingston 128GB SSDNow V Series SSD where the OS and most of the programs reside. I now have a 32 GB USB 3.0 Adata flash drive and wonder if the drive can be used with ReadyBoost to any great advantage. From what I read the drive would need to be formatted as exFAT or NTFS to create a large enough file, 12-16 GB. To quote Wikipedia, "If the system drive is a solid state disk (SSD), ReadyBoost is disabled since it would have little or no effect; this restriction has been removed in Windows 7."
Thoughts?
May 13, 2011 9:14:15 AM

Why would you be using readyboost if you got 8Gb of internal memory?
Is your memory maxed out ?
Maybe consider unloading resident programs witch you don't use on a daily basis.
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May 13, 2011 11:33:06 AM

Yep! readyboost is useless in Win7 if you have 4GB of ram or more.
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May 13, 2011 7:45:44 PM

Thanks for the responses. The pavilion dv7 has a max of 8 GB of RAM. I was reading the article about SSD caching with the Intel Z68 chipset which is what gave me this idea.
On the other end of the spectrum, I've read others advocating setting the pagefile to zero if you have a SSD but most seem to indicate the number of read/write cycles to the SSD is trivial at best and not to worry about it. We'll all be using a "Bridge to Nowhere" processor (Nowhere = "the Cloud") by the time the SSD dies. All apologies to the Talking Heads. No apologies to Intel.
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May 14, 2011 4:15:22 AM

Also, I've heard readyboost is next to useless even with 4gb or less.
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November 4, 2013 12:22:23 PM

Readyboost is useful even if you have 64GB of memory but most consumer mobos today top out at 8 or 16GB with a rare few at 32, but add (4) 32GB Usb 3.0 flash drives... you now have 128GB of extra space to cache data.. leave your PC running long enough, and pretty much everything will be loaded from cache :)  The reason being is any Sata 3 or SATA3 performs less than a USB 3.0 high speed thumb drive. Ram is faster, but, as I stated above, it's limited, and even IF your mobo allowed 64GB of RAM, it's EXPENSIVE :) 

The only time I could see RB being useless would be if ALL your HDDs were LARGE SATA 3 or SATAe (10Gpbs) drives... which they aren't unless your RICH... (and I don't think SSDs that big are around yet). The reason being is Sata 3 and SATAe SSD are equal or greater in speed than thumb drives. In this case, ready boost is useless. In fact, it will slow you down. To replace RB, you need LOTS of RAM and HIGH capacity, HIGH speed SSDs.. this is why if the system drive is a SSD, the Readyboost system is DISABLE because there's no point

I have 16TB of space on my computer and they are high RPM Sata3 drives. I have 8GB of ram, and that's the MAX my PC can have. So I stick in 2 32GB USB 3.0 thumb drives for 64GB extra cache.. after about 30-60 mins Superfetch, and me using it, pretty much have every program and every game cached on devices faster than my hard drives. Once everything is cached, my programs and games load about 2-3Xs faster
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