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Wedding Photography

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Anonymous
February 2, 2005 3:23:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
(or point to any sites which can).

Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.

He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
setting and lighting should be fairly good..

Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
area of Ireland.....any recommendations?

More about : wedding photography

February 2, 2005 3:23:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi John!

I'm an amateur and I did 2 weddings. It's not an easy task.
Some pointers:
1- Use an external flash - It's more powerful and you can direct it.
2- Get necessary permissions from the "officiant(s)" so as not to disturb
the ceremony.
3- Your lenses will have to work in conjunction with the flash / ambient
light. For instance, it would be useless to use a 200mm lens...
4- If there's an "official" photographer, don't get in the way.
5- Go to the pace of the ceremony before hand and shoot some photos to get
an idea of light, placement, etc.

This is almost basic but it's coming off as I write. You might say it shows
;-)

Marcel


"John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in message
news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
> (or point to any sites which can).
>
> Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
>
> He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
> setting and lighting should be fairly good..
>
> Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the
Cavan
> area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
>
>
February 2, 2005 3:23:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
>
> He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
> setting and lighting should be fairly good..

The more people who stand next to the professional wedding photographer
shooting snap shots, the worse your overall outcome will be. People get
confused and don't know where to look (for the formal shots, that is).

For the ceremony itself, cameras tend to be a distraction -- the fewer
the better.

Ask him if he can shoot the reception, the rehearsal, and the
preparations, instead. There will be tremendous photo opportunities at
these other occasions, and his record can provide fantastic memories.

To pick a photographer, ask freinds who have married for
recommendations, talk to them, and look at their portfoios.

Bob
Related resources
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 4:39:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 12:23:46 -0000, "John Ortt"
<JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:

>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
>Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
>(or point to any sites which can).

Pay someone?

>Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.

Errrr.... most lenses would suffice, except I doubt he'll have much
use for macro or 1000mm. (Unless you don't invite him of course, in
which case 1000mm would be a good choice). Normal stuff, a 80-300 zoom
is useful for candid snaps of guests at a distance, 120mm for bride &
groom portraits, 28mm for the group shots. External flash of course.

Give him the camera at least a month before the event, so he has a
slim chance of learning how to use it.

>He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
>setting and lighting should be fairly good..

Pros can get annoyed if they are being ghosted by another
photographer. It's a threat to possible sales of the photos they are
taking. I've heard they even own a share of the copyright if they
staged/lit a particular scene.

You may not mind annoying the pro, but a photographer who is being
hassled in this way is not 100% concentrating on what he is doing. If
it were me, I'd want 100% from him.

Make sure Dad is subtle - eg. definitely no tripod.

>Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
>area of Ireland.....any recommendations?

--
Owamanga!
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 5:58:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is
> keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a
> wedding (or point to any sites which can).
>
> Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
>
> He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
> setting and lighting should be fairly good..
>
> Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the
> Cavan area of Ireland.....any recommendations?

I am glad you will be using a professional.

I suggest that if he is not familiar with the camera now, he needs to
spend some time getting friendly with it. Have him take photos as Sunday
dinner or anytime the family is together. Don't wait for a special
occasion. Go over the result with him and between the two of you figure out
what may have been done better. By the time of the wedding the camera
should be a tool he is comfortable with and is no longer thinking about how
to use the camera.

Second at the wedding, tell him not to stand next to the professional.
The professional is likely to get better photographs from there anyway.
Look for what the professional will not get, like a picture of the
professional taking pictures.

You father will know the people much better than the professional. He
should use that information. For example if uncle Pat and aunt Beth are
dancing together, the professional will think nothing of it, but your father
will know they have not even spoken to each other since the event 25 years
ago at the Cliffs hotel at Yough. He can get the photos of the children and
special family friends that the professional will not have on his list of
standard photographs.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 7:00:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
> (or point to any sites which can).

Be sure you know the camera you intend to use and its quirks inside out
well before the event. You can get astonishingly good informal images
with modern point and shoot digicams in the right hands. The trick is to
know how to use your equipment rather than in having the best gear.
>
> Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.

A mild wide angle to mid zoom lens should suffice.
>
> He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
> setting and lighting should be fairly good..

Be sure to stay out of the pro's way. I use an inconspicuous camera when
I am present as a wedding guest to avoid upsetting them.

Most don't mind as long as you stay well off their sight line. And if
one does just take pictures of your friends and wedding guests instead.
It is only fair to let the pro set up any formal poses of the couple in
peace and quiet.
>
> Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
> area of Ireland.....any recommendations?

Ask around locally to see some of their portfolios.

Regards,
Marin Brown
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 8:20:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks for all the advice so far people, this is just the sort of thing we
were wanting

One thing I should have made clear is that my dad is reasonably familiar
with the 300D as we bought it just after they were released in the UK (Dec
2003).

He has always been a keen amateur photographer (film) and I fell in love
with my V1 digital Ixus about 5 years ago (which I might add is still going
strong and has taken some amazing photos).

I decided I wanted to evolve onto SLR's after a Safari Trip using my Ixus
which was severely disappointing due to it's lack of zoom.
In the end I had to hold my binoculars to one eye and the camera to the
other binocular lens to try and get a shot of a lion :) 

I vowed to get a digital SLR as soon as they were affordable and when my dad
found out he decided to go halves on it with me.
It has been an ideal solution....I get used to a more mature camera and my
dad goes digital.

We have used it mainly for outings and family gatherings so far...it is very
rare that we are both going somewhere interesting at the same time so we
have found sharing it to be very convienient.

We bought the 18-50 (I think) standard canon lens as an optional extra which
I think equates to about a 28-80 focal lenth in film cameras (please correct
me if I've got that one wrong).
we also have a 30-80 (50-120 ish?) which I bought off Ebay which might be
good for some facial closeups but not as much use as the other lens
Based on the coments so far I think this lens should be OK
I have also fitted the original lens with a hoya daylight filter, would
anybody recomend any different filters?

We have had great success with the night-time portrait mode in bars and
clubs on the family parties as the colours are lovely and rich and the
blurring where people move can produce some excellent results.
I also find outdoor shots on the standard point and shoot mode to be
excellent....but not as good as the pros
Neither of us have experimented with the true manual settings though....

I think my dad just wants to play with the camera at the wedding to try and
get some candid shots and other shots which the photographer might not have
been present at.
I also wanted him to get a couple of the group scenes aswell (just incase
the worst case scenario happens and the photographers film doesn't turn out
etc etc)

.........but as everybody has pointed out I would quite understand him
getting a bit peeved if he felt crowded.


Thanks once again and please feel free to leave any further advice if you
think it could help.

John
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 8:20:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
> Thanks for all the advice so far people, this is just the sort of
> thing we were wanting
>

<snip>

>
> I think my dad just wants to play with the camera at the wedding to
> try and get some candid shots and other shots which the photographer
> might not have been present at.
> I also wanted him to get a couple of the group scenes aswell (just
> incase the worst case scenario happens and the photographers film
> doesn't turn out etc etc)
>
> ........but as everybody has pointed out I would quite understand him
> getting a bit peeved if he felt crowded.
>
>
> Thanks once again and please feel free to leave any further advice if
> you think it could help.
>

Aha! Why does it have to be "him" getting peeved?

Wasn't there a woman from the Auld Sod here in the recent past, and
principally interested in doing weddings? It'd be quite a coincidence if
she were from the same area, but ...

How to find her?


--
Frank ess

PS: My daughter and granddaughter spent some time on the Dingle (?!)
Peninsula at New Year's. They said it was marvelous.
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 9:11:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
> (or point to any sites which can).
>
> Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
>
> He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
> setting and lighting should be fairly good..
>
> Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
> area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
>
>

Another respondent has suggested he concentrate on the 'informal' shots
which nobody else will. Don't forget your dad will be in some of the
formal shots too.

Also think about buying a disposable cameras with flash to put on each
table at the reception - you will then get the really fun shots of the
other guests in an informal setting like the toddlers and grannies.

Good luck.

Phil
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 3:09:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
> Thanks for all the advice so far people, this is just the sort of
> thing we were wanting
>
....

> I also wanted him to get a couple of the group scenes aswell (just
> incase the worst case scenario happens and the photographers film
> doesn't turn out etc etc)
>

And it does happen. I once worked for a large department store. The
general managers daughter was being married so he called on the store
portrait studio to do the job. They sent on of their regulars to do the
job. It was his second wedding of the day. He had tipped a few too many at
the first wedding and the entire second wedding was shoot on the same roll
of film. I was manager of the photo retail sales and photo processing
department. I ended up collecting all the pictures all the guest had taken
and ended up with a nice album. Years later she married my cousin.

....

>
> Thanks once again and please feel free to leave any further advice if
> you think it could help.
>
> John

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 7:33:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Joseph Meehan wrote:
> The professional is likely to get better photographs from there
anyway.
> Look for what the professional will not get, like a picture of the
> professional taking pictures.
>

Thats good advice. I shot a couple of weddings and deliberately left
out a lot of what the pro was shooting. Instead, I took the photographs
that meant more to everyone than the standard/conventional wedding
photographs. The result is very pleasing as the bridge/groom/family go
over them and are surprised at all the moments you've caught.

- Siddhartha
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:02:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in message
news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:02:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

RustY© wrote:
> "John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in message
> news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>
>>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
>>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
>
> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
> Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
>
>
Indeed, let him enjoy the ocassion! Hire some bad tempered, obnoxious,
and expensive professional. You will get better pictures, and if you
hate HIM after the ceremony, there is no harm done.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:39:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"RustY©" <No.Mail@All.Thanks> wrote in message
news:wUkMd.20$Zm6.10@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
>
> "John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in message
> news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
> > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father wants
> > to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
> Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.

It wasn't my decision, he wants to do it. I am sure my fiancee will step in
to ensure that the camera is put aside for all the shots he is supposed to
be in (she can be very firm when she wants to), but he thinks he will enjoy
the day more if he is allowed to do some photography.....
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:39:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
> "RustY©" <No.Mail@All.Thanks> wrote in message
> news:wUkMd.20$Zm6.10@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
>
>>"John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in message
>>news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>>
>>>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father wants
>>>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>>
>>Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
>>Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
>
>
> It wasn't my decision, he wants to do it. I am sure my fiancee will step in
> to ensure that the camera is put aside for all the shots he is supposed to
> be in (she can be very firm when she wants to), but he thinks he will enjoy
> the day more if he is allowed to do some photography.....
>
>
Sure, allow him (an anyone else) to take pictures, especially at any
reception/party after the wedding, but reserve the main shots for a pro.
After all, he should be IN many of those shots, and you will regret it
later if he is not.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:40:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<snip>
> > ........but as everybody has pointed out I would quite understand him
> > getting a bit peeved if he felt crowded.
> >
> Aha! Why does it have to be "him" getting peeved?

Sorry, very un-pc :) 
I think my brain was clouded due to all the photographers I have found so
far in the area being male.

>
> Wasn't there a woman from the Auld Sod here in the recent past, and
> principally interested in doing weddings? It'd be quite a coincidence if
> she were from the same area, but ...
>
> How to find her?
>
Lets hope she still reads the NG's..........
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:43:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Another respondent has suggested he concentrate on the 'informal' shots
> which nobody else will. Don't forget your dad will be in some of the
> formal shots too.

I think (hope) that is the direction he is going to take..... :) 

> Also think about buying a disposable cameras with flash to put on each
> table at the reception - you will then get the really fun shots of the
> other guests in an informal setting like the toddlers and grannies.

Yes, I think we will be doing. Some of our friends have done this at their
weddings and for a relatively small outlay they have got some lovely snaps.
(Lots of junk too but a few good ones is well worth the waste).

> Good luck.
>
> Phil
>
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 12:01:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in message
news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
> (or point to any sites which can).
>

The best advice is to conscientiously do things other than what the pro is
doing. Not only does it avoid annoying the pro but there is no point in
duplicating the effort when you would be better using this resource to take
pictures that the pro can't get. I recommend perusing the book "How to
Photograph Your Life" by Nick Kelsh for ideas.

> Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
>

Lens choice and settings are secondary. I would use a good "normal" or
slightly telephoto lens.

> He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
> setting and lighting should be fairly good..

Not necessarily. Most pros concentrate on getting close photos in rather
static situations. The lighting and setting are perfect for the pro, but you
will have a different camera and lens and it will look much different than
the pro's shots. You would be better served to go for open views with more
background, especially if the location is scenic, candids, and pictures with
more movement or from higher angles like balconies. Also, moving the bride
and groom, as well as various guests, outside the wedding can be an
interesting project. Leave the posed shots and family groups for the pro and
ignore these entirely.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 12:05:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> wrote in message
news:ZNqdna7Rit6HgJzfRVn-2g@giganews.com...
> >
>
> Aha! Why does it have to be "him" getting peeved?

Personally, I find it far more annoying that the neutral "him" when gender
is unknown is being chased from the English language. All the alternatives
are stilted and awkward and are no less offensive. I especially object to
the attempt at thought control implicit in this effort.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 12:50:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C J Campbell wrote:
> "Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> wrote in message
> news:ZNqdna7Rit6HgJzfRVn-2g@giganews.com...
>>>
>>
>> Aha! Why does it have to be "him" getting peeved?
>
> Personally, I find it far more annoying that the neutral "him" when
> gender is unknown is being chased from the English language. All the
> alternatives are stilted and awkward and are no less offensive. I
> especially object to the attempt at thought control implicit in this
> effort.


Oh, I agree. Most definitely.


As long as we are Off Thread And Ranting To The Gods Of Usenet (Hallowed
be ... ) :

I find it annoying that people find a need to insert "Personally" at the
beginnings of expressions that cannot possibly be otherwise.

I find it even more annoying when ordinary sweats climb up on their high
horses and "find" things, implying some judicial capacity or process
dignifies their Personally Opined blurts.

Personally, I find it most annoying of all and especially object when
tin ears in the population pounce upon an imagined affront they somehow
infer, ignoring obvious signals, and offer an arch whinge to posterity,
thereby immortalizing their plea for recognition as a superior being but
failing to realize its objective.

QED.


--
Frank ess
" ... and the horse you rode in on."
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 1:27:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ron Hunter wrote:
> RustY© wrote:
>> "John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in
>> message news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>>
>>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
>>> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>>
>>
>> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or
>> him. Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
>>
>>
> Indeed, let him enjoy the ocassion! Hire some bad tempered,
> obnoxious, and expensive professional. You will get better pictures,
> and if you hate HIM after the ceremony, there is no harm done.

Ron, read the thread. He is hiring a professional.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 1:30:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

RustY© wrote:
> "John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in
> message news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
>> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or
> him. Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.

I disagree. While it can be overdone, it does not sound like that will
happen here. The father enjoys photography and appears to do well. Telling
him he should not do what he likes and can do well would detract from the
day not add to it. Photography is a part of many people, a part that fits
into events like weddings. To deny that is artificial and would detract from
the event.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 1:57:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Joseph Meehan" <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:n3nMd.1174$XY5.696@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
> RustY© wrote:
>> "John Ortt" <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote in
>> message news:4200c49c$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
>>> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>>
>> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or
>> him. Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
>
> I disagree. While it can be overdone, it does not sound like that will
> happen here. The father enjoys photography and appears to do well.
> Telling him he should not do what he likes and can do well would detract
> from the day not add to it. Photography is a part of many people, a part
> that fits into events like weddings. To deny that is artificial and would
> detract from the event.
>
> --
> Joseph Meehan
>
> 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
>
Some people do not feel very comfortable at such family festivities and my
opinion below is based on personal experience.
Perhaps Dad will feel that he can attend the event and be happy as long as
he can have the camera as an excuse to wander among the other guests,
chatting here and there, and breaking off when required to go take some more
pictures. Let Dad do his thing and be happy to have him share in your
special day. You have the professional photographer there for the official
shots, so nothing is lost as long as Dad does not step on his toes.

Best wishes to you and your fiancé, and of course Dad !

Dennis
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 2:23:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> wrote in message
news:tNednfAZXab--Z_fRVn-jQ@giganews.com...
>
>
> Oh, I agree. Most definitely.
>
>
> As long as we are Off Thread And Ranting To The Gods Of Usenet (Hallowed
> be ... ) :
>
> I find it annoying that people find a need to insert "Personally" at the
> beginnings of expressions that cannot possibly be otherwise.
>
> I find it even more annoying when ordinary sweats climb up on their high
> horses and "find" things, implying some judicial capacity or process
> dignifies their Personally Opined blurts.
>
> Personally, I find it most annoying of all and especially object when
> tin ears in the population pounce upon an imagined affront they somehow
> infer, ignoring obvious signals, and offer an arch whinge to posterity,
> thereby immortalizing their plea for recognition as a superior being but
> failing to realize its objective.
>
> QED.

Personally, LOL.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 3:25:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
> (or point to any sites which can).

I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
experience this is an intolerable intrusion.

Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them to
take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were delighted,
and the results were most worthwhile.

So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
people having fun.

Andrew.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 3:25:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:
> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>
>>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
>>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
>
>>Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
>>(or point to any sites which can).
>
>
> I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
> surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
> quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
> photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
> activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
> as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
> experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>
> Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
> sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them to
> take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were delighted,
> and the results were most worthwhile.
>
> So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
> people having fun.
>
> Andrew.

How refreshing!


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 5:26:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:
> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
>> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
>> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a
>> wedding (or point to any sites which can).
>
> I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
> surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided
> very quickly that there was no way we were going to have a
> professional photographer present. Photographers dominate the
> post-wedding activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph
> such activities as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and
> groom. In my experience this is an intolerable intrusion.

Not the good ones. The good ones will hardly be noticed. The ones that
try to do as you say, and there are a lot of them, are doing it because they
have another wedding to do in 45 minutes and they have a standard list of
things they have been told to get at each wedding.

The good photographer may offer some suggestions. I have several times.
Often the photographer is the one with the most experience with weddings and
can foresee problems and missed opportunities that those involved may miss.
I have suggested getting doors open or providing a place for the guest to go
at the end of the reception line for example.

When my daughter was married, I got the photographer. It was in out of
town city so I did not know anyone. I did a fair search and I did find just
what I wanted. They did a very nice job. I think I took less than a dozen
pictures, including one of the photographer, :-)

>
> Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
> sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them to
> take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were delighted,
> and the results were most worthwhile.
>
> So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
> people having fun.
>
> Andrew.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 7:23:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:

>Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
>(or point to any sites which can).
[...]
>Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
>area of Ireland.....any recommendations?

It sounds like you're getting married in rural Ireland; I imagine it's
a small church, is that right? Anyway, at our wedding and that of my
sister-in-law, the photog did a shot of all the people who attended
the ceremony, and it worked out very well. We were in a stately home,
so had everyone on the terrace and steps behind the house. The in-laws
were in a small rural church, so for theirs all the guests gathered in
the church-yard and the photog went up the bell tower and got a bit of
an aerial shot, also quite nice. Aside from that, we really wanted him
to focus on 'candid' shots just of all the guests and us, (esp.
including during the ceilidh).

We especially asked for half the shots in black & white, which turned
out great. (It's not just a matter of taking colour out after-the-fact,
of course, because you'll generally compose shots differently for B&W
as for colour).

--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 7:23:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ken Tough <ken@objectech.co.uk> wrote:
> We especially asked for half the shots in black & white, which turned
> out great. (It's not just a matter of taking colour out after-the-fact,
> of course, because you'll generally compose shots differently for B&W
> as for colour).

There was a remark about this in Professional Photographer.
Apparently, some wedding photogs hate it when trendy young couples ask
for B&W -- apparently because they sell far fewer reprints to older
relatives.

Andrew.
February 3, 2005 7:23:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:

> There was a remark about this in Professional Photographer.
> Apparently, some wedding photogs hate it when trendy young couples ask
> for B&W -- apparently because they sell far fewer reprints to older
> relatives.

That's odd when you think about it. The implication is that older people
only care about their relatives if they have garish prints...

Of all the people I know who say, "Oh, I just love B&W," I think every
one of them is older (as in 50 or more).

When we got married, I told the photographer we wanted only B&W. He shot
Plus-X 120. I love our wedding album. Both my parents give me s***
about the "stupid B&W" to this day. We have color snapshots of the
occasion. I find all the clashing colors to be a distraction from the bride.

Bob
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 7:23:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

bob wrote:
> andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:
>
>> There was a remark about this in Professional Photographer.
>> Apparently, some wedding photogs hate it when trendy young couples ask
>> for B&W -- apparently because they sell far fewer reprints to older
>> relatives.
>
>
> That's odd when you think about it. The implication is that older people
> only care about their relatives if they have garish prints...
>
> Of all the people I know who say, "Oh, I just love B&W," I think every
> one of them is older (as in 50 or more).
>
> When we got married, I told the photographer we wanted only B&W. He shot
> Plus-X 120. I love our wedding album. Both my parents give me s***
> about the "stupid B&W" to this day. We have color snapshots of the
> occasion. I find all the clashing colors to be a distraction from the
> bride.
>
> Bob

I am one of those old folks, and I can't imagine ever again taking a B&W
picture, or ever again using film. Neither do I ride horses, drive a
car that requires shifting gears, or use a clock I have multiply in
order to decipher the time. I CAN do all of the above, I just don't
WANT to. Been there, done that, got tired of it.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 8:06:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> When my daughter was married, I got the photographer. It was in out
of
> town city so I did not know anyone. I did a fair search and I did find
just
> what I wanted. They did a very nice job. I think I took less than a
dozen
> pictures, including one of the photographer, :-)

What criteria did you use to determine the photographer?

The obvious one is the quality of the photographer's portfolio, but what
additionnal things would you look at?

A specific example my fiancee and I have come accross is a photographer (in
my fiance's home town) who has an outstanding portfolio, but we have heard a
couple of bad stories regarding getting the finished album off him. One
bride had to pester him for a year before eventually getting her album!

I am still considdering using him and giving him a chance to explain the
past events.
Possibly holding back 50% of the money back until we recieve the album....
February 3, 2005 8:06:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:

> What criteria did you use to determine the photographer?
>
> The obvious one is the quality of the photographer's portfolio, but what
> additionnal things would you look at?

Another criteria I used was the personalities of the prospects. I called
up and talked to a number of them on the telephone. I asked them
questions about how they worked and what they did. Litterally a job
interview.

Bob
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 8:14:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ken Tough" <ken@objectech.co.uk> wrote in message
news:55RtCDC4PjACFwmf@objectech.co.uk...
> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>
> >Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
> >(or point to any sites which can).
> [...]
> >Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the
Cavan
> >area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
>
> It sounds like you're getting married in rural Ireland; I imagine it's
> a small church, is that right? Anyway, at our wedding and that of my
> sister-in-law, the photog did a shot of all the people who attended
> the ceremony, and it worked out very well. We were in a stately home,
> so had everyone on the terrace and steps behind the house. The in-laws
> were in a small rural church, so for theirs all the guests gathered in
> the church-yard and the photog went up the bell tower and got a bit of
> an aerial shot, also quite nice. Aside from that, we really wanted him
> to focus on 'candid' shots just of all the guests and us, (esp.
> including during the ceilidh).
>
> We especially asked for half the shots in black & white, which turned
> out great. (It's not just a matter of taking colour out after-the-fact,
> of course, because you'll generally compose shots differently for B&W
> as for colour).
>
> --
> Ken Tough

Some excellent ideas there ken...

You are correct that the wedding is to be in a rural setting and we are
getting married in a small country church.
The only point it differs is the reception for which we have chosen a small
local castle.
In many ways it is more like a large manor house than a castle but it has
been my fiancee's dream to have it there ever since she was a small
girl.......so we are.

I think it could be a lovely contrast though, the very quaint and social
photographs at the church followed by more formal ones around the castle.

Again I like the idea of a mix of B&W as I think an atmospheric B&W shot can
be stunning if properly taken.

Anyway I had better move on to these other messages :) 

Thanks again Ken.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 9:25:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John Ortt wrote:
>> When my daughter was married, I got the photographer. It was in
>> out of town city so I did not know anyone. I did a fair search and
>> I did find just what I wanted. They did a very nice job. I think
>> I took less than a dozen pictures, including one of the
>> photographer, :-)
>
> What criteria did you use to determine the photographer?
>
> The obvious one is the quality of the photographer's portfolio, but
> what additionnal things would you look at?

Not just the quality, but the style. I also looked for evidence that
they considered themselves as recorders of an event, and not that the event
was being put on for their benefit. Once I pined it down to a couple, I
asked some friends of mine from the area to ask around to see if they knew
anyone who had used them. I got reports from both of the ones I was
considering and the reports supported my feelings based on the information I
already had collected.

>
> A specific example my fiancee and I have come accross is a
> photographer (in my fiance's home town) who has an outstanding
> portfolio, but we have heard a couple of bad stories regarding
> getting the finished album off him. One bride had to pester him for
> a year before eventually getting her album!

I agree. As you can see from what I wrote above, I was interested in
exactly that same type of thing. I know it happens I also know that it is
not all that unusual for a whole wedding to be lost due to photographer
failure. In this case they both passed that part of the test.

>
> I am still considdering using him and giving him a chance to explain
> the past events.

I believe that is wise, but I would hope he had a very good story and I
would check it out.

> Possibly holding back 50% of the money back until we recieve the
> album....

Maybe, I did not have a problem as it was their policy to only collect
about 30% ahead of time as I recall. This is something of a local thing
some high some low.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 12:19:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <T0uMd.14754$i42.6211@fe1.columbus.rr.com>,
"Joseph Meehan" <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote:

> > Possibly holding back 50% of the money back until we recieve the
> > album....
>
> Maybe, I did not have a problem as it was their policy to only collect
> about 30% ahead of time as I recall. This is something of a local thing
> some high some low.

That's really incredible only 30% makes you wonder how they stay
afloat.

I take 50 up front and 50 when the customer gets the book. Of course
there's another side, called dead beat clients,...bounced checks, etc.

Some people it astounds me how they manage to ask the prices they
do and still get clients willing to accept it,....$2,500 for three 5x7's
and an a single 8x10.
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 12:20:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Inaccessible wrote:
> In article <T0uMd.14754$i42.6211@fe1.columbus.rr.com>,
> "Joseph Meehan" <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>> Possibly holding back 50% of the money back until we recieve the
>>> album....
>>
>> Maybe, I did not have a problem as it was their policy to only
>> collect about 30% ahead of time as I recall. This is something of a
>> local thing some high some low.
>
> That's really incredible only 30% makes you wonder how they stay
> afloat.
>
> I take 50 up front and 50 when the customer gets the book. Of course
> there's another side, called dead beat clients,...bounced checks,
> etc.
>
> Some people it astounds me how they manage to ask the prices they
> do and still get clients willing to accept it,....$2,500 for three
> 5x7's and an a single 8x10.

And the most astounding part is the quality. While it may be no worse,
it is certainly no better than that produced by the better main stream
photographers.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
February 4, 2005 1:07:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 12:23:46 -0000, "John Ortt"
<JohnOrtt@Idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:

>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
>Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
>(or point to any sites which can).
>
>Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
>
>He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
>setting and lighting should be fairly good..
>
>Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
>area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
>

I have been official photographer at a couple of weddings recently and I've also
been informally taking pictures at a couple. In the latter case I've kept *well*
out of the pro's way and concentrated on stuff he wasn't and couldn't be doing.
In each case the bridal couple have loved my pictures, because they have a
different slant and complement the pro's. Why stand next to the pro and steal
the results of his work in setting up shots?

In a non-official capacity I do candids, whacky angles, pics of the photographer
taking pics and so on. As it happens I use a 300D. I also have an EF 50mm/1.8
lens, and love cranking up to ISO1600 and getting candids of the dancers, the
band, drunken louts at the tables, 8 year old daughters dancing with Auntie
Edna, whatever. Then I might revert to a clip-on flash (420EX) bounced off the
ceiling for some "insurance" shots of the reception guests. Official
photographers often do not cover the reception, so an "unofficial" coverage may
be the only one.

Also, rember rule number 1: Practice beforehand.
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 1:12:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:

>I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
>surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
>quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
>photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
>activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
>as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
>experience this is an intolerable intrusion.

We made sure our photog knew we didn't want this, didn't want more
than a very few posed shots, and ruled out any shots during the
ceremony itself. (Though we knew this guy and his work and style
and knew he'd never do those things...)l It worked out great.

--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 1:14:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:

>Ken Tough <ken@objectech.co.uk> wrote:
>> We especially asked for half the shots in black & white, which turned
>> out great. (It's not just a matter of taking colour out after-the-fact,
>> of course, because you'll generally compose shots differently for B&W
>> as for colour).

>There was a remark about this in Professional Photographer.
>Apparently, some wedding photogs hate it when trendy young couples ask
>for B&W -- apparently because they sell far fewer reprints to older
>relatives.

I can see that, though I can also see that older relatives (of a
certain age) actually prefer the B&W shots.

Our photog was a pro friend, and he just gave us contacts, one
set of prints, and all the negs. He mainly did it as a favour.

--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 1:16:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

>I am one of those old folks, and I can't imagine ever again taking a B&W
>picture, or ever again using film. Neither do I ride horses, drive a
>car that requires shifting gears, or use a clock I have multiply in
>order to decipher the time. I CAN do all of the above, I just don't
>WANT to. Been there, done that, got tired of it.

Funny, I can't abide driving cars without gears, love it when I
get a chance to ride a horse, love shooting digital B&W (and don't
follow you about the clock, but work in 24hr time).

--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:34:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid> wrote in message
news:110462fpqp69cdc@news.supernews.com...
> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is
>> keep
>> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>
>> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
>> (or point to any sites which can).
>
> I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
> surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
> quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
> photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
> activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
> as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
> experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>
> Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
> sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them to
> take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were delighted,
> and the results were most worthwhile.
>
> So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
> people having fun.
>
> Andrew.

My wife and I strive to be as inconspicuous as possible at all times during
the event. We are delighted when clients make comments like, " we didn't
even know you were there," or "wow, you got that shot! We didn't notice
you!" We do a few posed shots, only if the clients want them, and only the
ones they want. We suggest a lot of fun variations on the traditional, and,
otherwise, fade into the background. Most of the good photographers do the
same, which is why we work toward that goal. One photographer we know has a
wonderful shot of the bride, curled up, asleep on the lawn of the Hotel Del
Coronado. Can't get that if you're intrusive... If your experience is/was
different, that is the fault of the individual photographer, not wedding
photographers as a group.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:40:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"bob" <not@not.not> wrote in message
news:7jsMd.7023$3W3.3223@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
> andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:
>
>> There was a remark about this in Professional Photographer.
>> Apparently, some wedding photogs hate it when trendy young couples ask
>> for B&W -- apparently because they sell far fewer reprints to older
>> relatives.
>
> That's odd when you think about it. The implication is that older people
> only care about their relatives if they have garish prints...
>
> Of all the people I know who say, "Oh, I just love B&W," I think every one
> of them is older (as in 50 or more).
>
> When we got married, I told the photographer we wanted only B&W. He shot
> Plus-X 120. I love our wedding album. Both my parents give me s*** about
> the "stupid B&W" to this day. We have color snapshots of the occasion. I
> find all the clashing colors to be a distraction from the bride.
>
> Bob

Every one of the wedding clients we've had in the last year has requested
that at least some of the images from their wedding be in black and white,
or at least inquired as to the availability of b&w. One of the advantages
of shooting digital for a wedding is the ease of conversion from color to
black and white. And shooting with the 20D, which give the option of
shooting color RAW and black and white JPEG at the same time. By the way,
none of those clients, or prospective clients, were over 35.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:41:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ken Tough" <ken@objectech.co.uk> wrote in message
news:mCkacqCvaoACFw3E@objectech.co.uk...
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>>I am one of those old folks, and I can't imagine ever again taking a B&W
>>picture, or ever again using film. Neither do I ride horses, drive a
>>car that requires shifting gears, or use a clock I have multiply in
>>order to decipher the time. I CAN do all of the above, I just don't
>>WANT to. Been there, done that, got tired of it.
>
> Funny, I can't abide driving cars without gears, love it when I
> get a chance to ride a horse, love shooting digital B&W (and don't
> follow you about the clock, but work in 24hr time).
>
> --
> Ken Tough

I'm with you, Ken! I can't imagine ever being at the point that I'd not
enjoy any of those things! Except for the 24 hr. clock thing... ;-)

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
February 4, 2005 12:41:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ron Hunter wrote:
> bob wrote:
>
>> That's odd when you think about it. The implication is that older
>> people only care about their relatives if they have garish prints...
>>
>> Of all the people I know who say, "Oh, I just love B&W," I think every
>> one of them is older (as in 50 or more).
>>
>> When we got married, I told the photographer we wanted only B&W. He
>> shot Plus-X 120. I love our wedding album. Both my parents give me
>> s*** about the "stupid B&W" to this day. We have color snapshots of
>> the occasion. I find all the clashing colors to be a distraction from
>> the bride.
>>
>> Bob
>
>
> I am one of those old folks, and I can't imagine ever again taking a B&W
> picture, or ever again using film. Neither do I ride horses, drive a
> car that requires shifting gears, or use a clock I have multiply in
> order to decipher the time. I CAN do all of the above, I just don't
> WANT to. Been there, done that, got tired of it.
>
>

I wasn't talking about people *shooting* B&W, I was talking about people
(mainly non photographers) who enjoy having good prints in B&W.

Bob
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 7:11:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Skip M wrote:
> <andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid> wrote in message
> news:110462fpqp69cdc@news.supernews.com...
>> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
>>> is keep
>>> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>>
>>> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a
>>> wedding (or point to any sites which can).
>>
>> I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps
>> rather surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we
>> decided very quickly that there was no way we were going to have a
>> professional photographer present. Photographers dominate the
>> post-wedding activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph
>> such activities as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and
>> groom. In my experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>>
>> Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
>> sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them
>> to take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were
>> delighted, and the results were most worthwhile.
>>
>> So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
>> people having fun.
>>
>> Andrew.
>
> My wife and I strive to be as inconspicuous as possible at all times
> during the event. We are delighted when clients make comments like,
> " we didn't even know you were there," or "wow, you got that shot! We
> didn't notice you!"

I agree, that is the way it should be.

> We do a few posed shots, only if the clients
> want them, and only the ones they want.

I do recommend some posed shoots, but not many.

> We suggest a lot of fun
> variations on the traditional, and, otherwise, fade into the
> background. Most of the good photographers do the same, which is why
> we work toward that goal. One photographer we know has a wonderful
> shot of the bride, curled up, asleep on the lawn of the Hotel Del
> Coronado. Can't get that if you're intrusive... If your experience
> is/was different, that is the fault of the individual photographer,
> not wedding photographers as a group.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 7:11:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Joseph Meehan" <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:h9NMd.14887$i42.11730@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
> Skip M wrote:
>> <andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:110462fpqp69cdc@news.supernews.com...
>>> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>>>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
>>>> is keep
>>>> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>>>
>>>> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a
>>>> wedding (or point to any sites which can).
>>>
>>> I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps
>>> rather surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we
>>> decided very quickly that there was no way we were going to have a
>>> professional photographer present. Photographers dominate the
>>> post-wedding activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph
>>> such activities as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and
>>> groom. In my experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>>>
>>> Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
>>> sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them
>>> to take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were
>>> delighted, and the results were most worthwhile.
>>>
>>> So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
>>> people having fun.
>>>
>>> Andrew.
>>
>> My wife and I strive to be as inconspicuous as possible at all times
>> during the event. We are delighted when clients make comments like,
>> " we didn't even know you were there," or "wow, you got that shot! We
>> didn't notice you!"
>
> I agree, that is the way it should be.
>
>> We do a few posed shots, only if the clients
>> want them, and only the ones they want.
>
> I do recommend some posed shoots, but not many.
Yep, the parents and grandparents seem to want them more than the kids do,
and we have to keep the check writers happy! Whenever one of our clients
says they don't really want formal poses, we do remind them that Mom and Dad
might, which usually elicits a response of, "Oh, yes, well we do want SOME
pictures with Mom and Dad, but we really like the fun stuff!"
>
>> We suggest a lot of fun
>> variations on the traditional, and, otherwise, fade into the
>> background. Most of the good photographers do the same, which is why
>> we work toward that goal. One photographer we know has a wonderful
>> shot of the bride, curled up, asleep on the lawn of the Hotel Del
>> Coronado. Can't get that if you're intrusive... If your experience
>> is/was different, that is the fault of the individual photographer,
>> not wedding photographers as a group.
>
> --
> Joseph Meehan
>
> 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
>
--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:47:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 3 Feb 2005 22:12:31 +0200, Ken Tough <ken@objectech.co.uk>
wrote:

>andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:
>
>>I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
>>surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
>>quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
>>photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
>>activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
>>as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
>>experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>
>We made sure our photog knew we didn't want this, didn't want more
>than a very few posed shots, and ruled out any shots during the
>ceremony itself. (Though we knew this guy and his work and style
>and knew he'd never do those things...)l It worked out great.
>
>--
>Ken Tough

Any good pro photog would not intrude in such a way, rather blend
in...
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:55:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 4 Feb 2005 06:34:34 -0800, "Skip M" <shadowcatcher@cox.net>
wrote:

><andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid> wrote in message
>news:110462fpqp69cdc@news.supernews.com...
>> John Ortt <JohnOrtt@idontwantspamsonoreturnaddress.com> wrote:
>>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is
>>> keep
>>> to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
>>
>>> Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
>>> (or point to any sites which can).
>>
>> I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
>> surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
>> quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
>> photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
>> activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
>> as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
>> experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>>
>> Instead, we asked all the guests to take photographs and let us have
>> sets. Also, we gave every child a disposable camera and asked them to
>> take photographs of whatever they liked. The children were delighted,
>> and the results were most worthwhile.
>>
>> So, instead of posed group photographs, we have lots of pictures of
>> people having fun.
>>
>> Andrew.
>
>My wife and I strive to be as inconspicuous as possible at all times during
>the event. We are delighted when clients make comments like, " we didn't
>even know you were there," or "wow, you got that shot! We didn't notice
>you!" We do a few posed shots, only if the clients want them, and only the
>ones they want. We suggest a lot of fun variations on the traditional, and,
>otherwise, fade into the background. Most of the good photographers do the
>same, which is why we work toward that goal. One photographer we know has a
>wonderful shot of the bride, curled up, asleep on the lawn of the Hotel Del
>Coronado. Can't get that if you're intrusive... If your experience is/was
>different, that is the fault of the individual photographer, not wedding
>photographers as a group.
>
>--
>Skip Middleton
>http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
>

I agree. This may ba a case of you get what you pay for or let the
buyer beware. When I did a lot of weddings, I got 99% of my work from
word of mouth because I define professional beyond one who gets paid
for a job. IMHO a good wedding photographer is barely visible unless
needed and is able to help in other ways if asked upon to do so. Not
to mention (s)he must be a diplomatic negotiator in a time when may
are stressed out.




>
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 9:59:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ZONED! <no_email@please_post.net> wrote:
> On Thu, 3 Feb 2005 22:12:31 +0200, Ken Tough <ken@objectech.co.uk>
> wrote:

>>andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid wrote:
>>
>>>I'm finding the replies to this thread interesting, and perhaps rather
>>>surprising. When my wife and I decided to get married, we decided very
>>>quickly that there was no way we were going to have a professional
>>>photographer present. Photographers dominate the post-wedding
>>>activities, even to the extent of trying to choreograph such activities
>>>as throwing confetti and greeting the bride and groom. In my
>>>experience this is an intolerable intrusion.
>>
>>We made sure our photog knew we didn't want this, didn't want more
>>than a very few posed shots, and ruled out any shots during the
>>ceremony itself. (Though we knew this guy and his work and style
>>and knew he'd never do those things...)l It worked out great.

> Any good pro photog would not intrude in such a way, rather blend
> in...

I wonder if the convention is different in different countries. Over
here, wedding photographers tend to do posed group shots. "reportage"
style is becoming popular, but AFAIK it's stil a minority taste.

Andrew.
!