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First Build: 2600k vs. 2500k; CUDA vs CPU for Video Editing

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  • Homebuilt
  • Video Editing
  • Build
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
February 12, 2011 8:31:34 PM

I'm a Noob just trying to figure out the best route I should take for my first build. I plan on doing some HD home video editing and transcoding movies for archival and also to put them on my smartphone. I may get into some gaming latter on, since I recently sold my console.

I plan on buying Cyberlink PD9 Ultimate which can utilize CUDA cores for encoding. I already have a video transcoder that can also use CUDA, but since I don't have a GPU in my old Dell P4 I have no idea what I could expect from GPU in this regard either. Here is what I've got in my cart online:

i7 2600k or 2500k
EVGA GTX 460 SC
ULTRA Series Pro 750W
Corsair XM3 1600MHz - 8Gigs
OCZ Vertex 2 SSD
Cooler Master Storm Scout
MoBo - Not Sure

With that in mind is a processor with HT going to be as valuable to me?

More about : build 2600k 2500k cuda cpu video editing

February 12, 2011 8:48:14 PM

Video transcoding/editing is one of the few applications that can take advantage of hyper-threading, so a i7-2600K would be a good choice for a CPU. CUDA will make a huge difference for your transcoding, although I have heard that some implementations "cheat" by reducing image quality.
February 12, 2011 8:59:46 PM

I've read some of the same things about image quality with using CUDA to transcoding via Badaboom. I have no idea how well PD9 fairs in this regard though. I understand hyperthreading can make an impact on video encoding, but if the GPU is handling the lion's share of the work load for that then it seems like the processor having the ability to HT wouldn't really matter. But like I said before I'm new at all this so maybe that doesn't make sense.
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February 12, 2011 10:43:30 PM

If your editing/transcoding software does support CUDA then certainly your CPU wouldn't be as heavily stressed, so you're right that hyper-threading wouldn't be as heavily needed. You'll still want a powerful CPU because some of the work must still be performed by the CPU. I have to say that a i5-2500K or i7-2600K would be a good choice.

So overall I'd say just go with the i5-2500K and save $100.
February 13, 2011 3:12:15 AM

Thanks for the input, I am leaning that way.