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Looking for a beep expert

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January 17, 2012 4:24:23 PM

Hi,

Recently I've asked for help in a sub-forum called: 'Chipset & Bios'.

The link follows: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/305035-12-post-boot... (if you're interested).

I haven't really gotten any further since I wrote my last post.

The furthest I got in the end was getting these rather confusing beeps. In case you do not feel like going to link I just mentioned they go: [short - short] (2x quick ones) -- [short - short - short - short - short - short] (6x) where the '--' is a little pause / break.

I've sought through the darkest alleys of Google to find a possible solution, but none to avail. Most people keep it simple and say: 'Well, time to buy a new computer'. Which is NOT the advice I'm seeking for.

Something tells me w.e. the problem is, it cannot be utter good. However, I'd like to know why I'd have to buy a new motherboard instead of mindlessly doing so.

Anyway, I got an AMI BIOS. Which should have the following definitions for the beeps: http://www.bioscentral.com/beepcodes/amibeep.htm

Since I get 2 quick ones, before I get the other 6 short ones, there's still some tiny bit of hope inside of me.

EDIT: I'd almost forget mentioning, what I think is rather important, that I got this problem ever since I replaced my keyboard with another one. The old one I used to have was connected with an USB plug, but the new (or rather old) one had a PS/2 plug. Kind of starting to regret that now.

I'm hoping to get some answers in this section.

All help is greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

More about : beep expert

a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2012 5:18:23 PM

Alright, according to both of your URL addresses (your post in the UK forum as well as the BIOS beep code information), it looks like your integrated controller for your keyboard have have gotten shocked (did you notice any static when changing keyboards?, is there a lot of carpet around your keyboard, or anything that can be considered staticky?).

It also mentions something about memory parity error, the rams integrated controller may be bad.

I notice you have the i7 920 - which has an integrated memory controller, so perhaps your CPU has been fried (static)? Are you able to test out that CPU in another computer?

Also, have you tried swapping out RAM with another set to see if it does anything?
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a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2012 6:01:45 PM

Generally the constant short beeps is ram. I would pull the ram out blow out the sockets with air and reinstall the ram. Or maybe just 1 ram chip to see if it posts.

Its a good idea to start with ram because it is the easiest thing to take out clean and reinstall.
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January 17, 2012 6:42:35 PM

Chainzsaw said:
Alright, according to both of your URL addresses (your post in the UK forum as well as the BIOS beep code information), it looks like your integrated controller for your keyboard have have gotten shocked (did you notice any static when changing keyboards?, is there a lot of carpet around your keyboard, or anything that can be considered staticky?).

It also mentions something about memory parity error, the rams integrated controller may be bad.

I notice you have the i7 920 - which has an integrated memory controller, so perhaps your CPU has been fried (static)? Are you able to test out that CPU in another computer?

Also, have you tried swapping out RAM with another set to see if it does anything?


Thank you for replying, I appreciate it!

I did not notice any static when changing keyboards. I had my computer powered off and the (new) keyboard was working perfectly on another computer I used to work with. There is no carpet around my keyboard, or well, no carpet at all in my room. Something static... hmm... Besides the clothes I wear, and I guess myself, I would say no.

I haven't gotten the chance yet to try my CPU on another motherboard yet, but I should soon when my buddy brings his computer over. Though, I'm just wondering, my motherboard does notify that my CPU is in Phase 5. Does that mean anything or not? I believe it has something to do with power management, but not entirely sure.

I just tried swapping out RAM with another set, although I already did it once, but just wanted to make sure, and it gave the exact same beeps. However: if I don't put any in, no memory modules at all, it gives me 3 long beeps. -shrugs- does that mean anything good?

bucknutty said:
Generally the constant short beeps is ram. I would pull the ram out blow out the sockets with air and reinstall the ram. Or maybe just 1 ram chip to see if it posts.

Its a good idea to start with ram because it is the easiest thing to take out clean and reinstall.


I appreciate your reply! Thank you.

Just as I said to the person above me, I did just reinstall my memory, but it didn't change the beeps or whatsoever. No post either, obviously. When I removed all of the memory modules, it gave me 3 long beeps.

3 long beeps isn't defined anywhere though.. to my surprise. Well, at least not the for AMI BIOS I possess.
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a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2012 6:47:28 PM

Do you have any way to test the keyboard with another computer... If it is defective and dead shorting it can cause any type of wiere behavior.

If its not the ram, try taking out the video card and posting with no video card. See if the beep matches.

Again taking out the video card is quick and easy.
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January 17, 2012 6:55:39 PM

bucknutty said:
Do you have any way to test the keyboard with another computer... If it is defective and dead shorting it can cause any type of wiere behavior.

If its not the ram, try taking out the video card and posting with no video card. See if the beep matches.

Again taking out the video card is quick and easy.


I just tested the keyboard on another computer and it worked flawlessly.

I also tried taking out the video card, but it gave the exact same beeps. (2x short, pause, 6x short.) (and no post obviously)
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a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2012 7:00:35 PM

well that migh mean something... So when you take out the ram you get a differnt beep but if you take out the video card you get the same beep... Can your beep indicate the issue is with the GPU?

Does the system have on board gpu? If it does I would expect it to work switch to the onboard when the card was taken out.

If it does not have on board I would try another video card.
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January 17, 2012 7:06:31 PM

bucknutty said:
well that migh mean something... So when you take out the ram you get a differnt beep but if you take out the video card you get the same beep... Can your beep indicate the issue is with the GPU?

Does the system have on board gpu? If it does I would expect it to work switch to the onboard when the card was taken out.

If it does not have on board I would try another video card.


I do get a different beep when I take out all the RAM. I think it can indicate if that's the issue, but it would be more beeps, if I researched it correctly. Anyway, I don't have an on board GPU, but I do have other video cards. Which I'm going to try right as we speak.

EDIT: Just tried another video card, but the beeps didn't change nor was I granted a post.
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January 17, 2012 7:20:07 PM

bucknutty said:
So you tired the ram..
Tried the video card...
I guess its time to start at the begging and go through this step by step.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...


Thank you for linking! Again, I appreciate you trying to help.

Though, someone already gave me that link, which I've went through step by step. Sadly, none were to avail except step 17 which made me use a speaker to see what beeps I get.

However, at the ending of the article it says:
'Pull everything except the CPU and HSF. Boot. You should hear a series of long single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence here indicates, in probable order, a bad PSU, motherboard, or CPU - or a bad installation where something is shorting and shutting down the PSU.'

I do get those long beeps, but in gods name what does that mean? The more I get into the problem, the more confused I get.

Anyway, I guess it's time to try a different PSU. If that's not the problem, then it must be lying in either the motherboard or the CPU.
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a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2012 7:40:38 PM

xScoobie said:

I haven't gotten the chance yet to try my CPU on another motherboard yet, but I should soon when my buddy brings his computer over. Though, I'm just wondering, my motherboard does notify that my CPU is in Phase 5. Does that mean anything or not? I believe it has something to do with power management, but not entirely sure.


No problem for the advice. As for your motherboard telling you your CPU is in phase 5 - I believe this either points to a motherboard, or CPU problem. I'm leaning more towards a CPU problem because if the CPU is in phase 5 - it should get out of there (i'm guessing those phases have something to do with checking the L1-2 cache type of thing, and probably a few others to make sure the CPU is ok)

I would say the next logical step would be to try out the CPU in a friends machine, as well as try a different cpu in your own motherboard (a cpu you know that works).

Edit:

One more thing I wanted to add, according to this:

http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?topic=149331.0

Someone had a similar problem - cpu stuck in phase 1 - I know your motherboard is completely different, but the issues could be similar. It got fixed by replacing his motherboard.
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January 17, 2012 9:13:40 PM

Try POST with USB keyboard and see if that helps you. It might be that it's got problem with PS/2.
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January 17, 2012 9:14:34 PM

To my recent posts: I just swapped my PSU with one that I know that works, but sadly it didn't solve my problem.

Chainzsaw said:
No problem for the advice. As for your motherboard telling you your CPU is in phase 5 - I believe this either points to a motherboard, or CPU problem. I'm leaning more towards a CPU problem because if the CPU is in phase 5 - it should get out of there (i'm guessing those phases have something to do with checking the L1-2 cache type of thing, and probably a few others to make sure the CPU is ok)

I would say the next logical step would be to try out the CPU in a friends machine, as well as try a different cpu in your own motherboard (a cpu you know that works).

Edit:

One more thing I wanted to add, according to this:

http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?topic=149331.0

Someone had a similar problem - cpu stuck in phase 1 - I know your motherboard is completely different, but the issues could be similar. It got fixed by replacing his motherboard.

As far as I know, it's literally always in Phase 5. It's always been there too. Even when my computer was still running and I was in Windows, I've seen it being on Phase 5. So that makes the phases a rather confusing thing.

But yes, since swapping the PSU (second time) didn't work, my only options left are trying out my motherboard and my CPU. No one nearby owns an i7 or a motherboard with the same socket as I do, so I'll just have to wait for my buddy to come in a week or two. (even though waiting is a pain in the ass when you want something solved!)

Anyway, I'm just oh so curious as to why I'm having this problem. Still looking for another beep expert to tell me where the two quick beeps followed by 6 are for. Just doesn't make any sense.

Thanks again.

Tmanishere said:
Try POST with USB keyboard and see if that helps you. It might be that it's got problem with PS/2.

Thank you for trying to give good advice and help, I appreciate it.

Quite honestly though, I already tried that without any success. It simply keeps giving the same beeps. However, I do feel like somethings wrong with my PS/2 connection or controller. Ever since I started to use a keyboard with that plug, I got these blood boiling problems.
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January 17, 2012 11:57:48 PM

Typically during the POST test, it checks for RAM, video card, and keyboard. If one of them fails, it beeps like the chart you posted.

Two short beeps are telling you that the hardware check failed. Six short beeps tells you that the keyboard controller is bad. If the beeps are correct, you need a new motherboard.
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January 18, 2012 6:34:54 AM

Tmanishere said:
Typically during the POST test, it checks for RAM, video card, and keyboard. If one of them fails, it beeps like the chart you posted.

Two short beeps are telling you that the hardware check failed. Six short beeps tells you that the keyboard controller is bad. If the beeps are correct, you need a new motherboard.


Thank you, the beeps now sort of make sense. I was hoping those two quick beeps meant something good, but I guess they're just as blood boiling as the other six.

There's just one thing I was wondering. If you visit this link: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/103453-12-beeps-sho... the last guy is talking about the first two beeps being some sort of identifier to notify a port is broken or well, not powered.

Does that mean, in simple terms, that my port somehow broke down? That's so weird though since I didn't do anything weird with my computer.
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January 18, 2012 12:15:33 PM

I think the article is saying that there was possibly a port short circuiting. The short on the port might have been preventing a power-up. It's a hard thing to diagnose, unfortunately, and even if it's a simple thing as a short, it could prevent the computer from booting up.

I see examples of KVM switch confusing the keyboard and mouse confusing the keyboard controller. I can see that happening, but I already assume you unplugged all USB and tried different keyboard.
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January 18, 2012 4:49:52 PM

Tmanishere said:
I think the article is saying that there was possibly a port short circuiting. The short on the port might have been preventing a power-up. It's a hard thing to diagnose, unfortunately, and even if it's a simple thing as a short, it could prevent the computer from booting up.

I see examples of KVM switch confusing the keyboard and mouse confusing the keyboard controller. I can see that happening, but I already assume you unplugged all USB and tried different keyboard.


Hmm, either way it doesn't seem like something that could get easily fixed. Quite a bummer! I really feel like I screwed things up, the moment I started to use a keyboard with a PS/2 plug. Totally regretting that decision now.

Thanks again.
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Best solution

March 6, 2012 9:36:36 PM

Hi,

Let me start off by apologizing for bumping such an old thread, but I really wanted to finish this.

In the end nothing I did, nor what I've been told to do, worked. There was no other solution than buying a new motherboard, which did solve my problem. Sure, I could've brought it to some kind of repair store, but I strongly believe that all they'd do is simply replace my motherboard and add another 50 bucks to it.

Please, for future references, if you get or have the same problem as I do, don't bother trying to fix it. I've spent a lot of time on possible solutions, but none to avail. However, I can tell you why I was getting the problem.

So, the six beeps did a great job at telling me what the problem actually was. It really had to do with my keyboard controller. It's this chip on your motherboard, that well, controls your keyboard. (captain obvious, I know) In some absolute rare cases you can either accidentally shortcut the port for your keyboard or the keyboard controller itself fails or what I had, well what I believe I had, is that your keyboard might statically destroy the controller. Since my keyboard was really old and worn-out I really wouldn't be surprised if that's what caused the problem. Especially since it's the only thing I actually changed from the moment with no problems at all. In any case, something horrible happens to your controller. :ange: 

In all honesty, I've seen countless of computer problems, but I'd never expect to see something like this. Then again, they made six beeps for it so it must be rather popular. :lol: 

If you're as stubborn as me when it comes to giving up on solutions, you might want to try to "blow out" the PS/2 port for your keyboard. Then you might want to try another keyboard. If both fail, try to look for the corresponding keyboard controller chip on your motherboard and see if it's replaceable. Even though I'm not familiar with any such motherboard, I'm sure it exists and it might help you out.

Anyway, enough with me jabbering! Thanks again for everyone who tried to help and thanks for reading. Till we meet again!

Bye-bye! :hello: 

EDIT: Before I go, I almost forgot to say that I tried to contact MSI(my motherboard manufacturer) and asked for help. Don't. It was very complex to understand the guy who was trying to help me, and the help they offered was just pointless anyways. They told me to flash my BIOS, but I clearly stated that I couldn't even get anything loaded / shown. Even though I appreciate all help, this was just frustrating since I sort of expected at least a professional answer, not necessarily a solution. Just my two cents on their support.
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a c 328 V Motherboard
March 7, 2012 6:32:02 AM

Best answer selected by nikorr.
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a c 328 V Motherboard
March 7, 2012 6:32:12 AM

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