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Easy way too connect two laptops.

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 1:24:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
like to know the best method to connecting the two together without the
use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...

More about : easy connect laptops

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 3:51:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

denglish48060@gmail.com wrote:
> Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
> like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
> the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
> serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...


Google "ethernet crossover cable"

Basically, it's just a normal Cat5 cable with the send and receive reversed.
Plug one end into each computer...much, much faster than serial. You'll
need to set up the normal network protocols in each laptop and designate a
workgroup as you would with a router or hub.

jak
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 3:51:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net> writes:
> > Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
> > like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
> > the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
> > serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>
> Google "ethernet crossover cable"/ Basically, it's just a normal Cat5
> cable with the send and receive reversed.

Well, there's further questions, like where are the IP addresses
supposed to come from if there's no router serving DHCP? Maybe W2k
Pro takes care of that, I don't know. Note also that most laptops
these days (especially those with gigabit ethernet) support MDI so
they don't need crossover cables.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 5:53:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:

> "jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net> writes:
>> > Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
>> > like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
>> > the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
>> > serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>>
>> Google "ethernet crossover cable"/ Basically, it's just a normal Cat5
>> cable with the send and receive reversed.
>
> Well, there's further questions, like where are the IP addresses
> supposed to come from if there's no router serving DHCP? Maybe W2k
> Pro takes care of that, I don't know. Note also that most laptops
> these days (especially those with gigabit ethernet) support MDI so
> they don't need crossover cables.

You assign static addresses. DHCP is a convenience, not a necessity.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 5:53:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
> You assign static addresses. DHCP is a convenience, not a necessity.

True. What about routes? Anyway it looks like Windows has some built
in widget for taking care of that.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 7:23:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid&gt; wrote:
>Well, there's further questions, like where are the IP addresses
>supposed to come from if there's no router serving DHCP?

Win2K and WinXP will automatically assign an address for each that'll
work, and will probably default you to the same workgroup.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 7:55:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:

> "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
>> You assign static addresses. DHCP is a convenience, not a necessity.
>
> True. What about routes? Anyway it looks like Windows has some built
> in widget for taking care of that.

You only need to worry about routes if the machines are on different
subnets.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 7:55:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
> > True. What about routes? Anyway it looks like Windows has some built
> > in widget for taking care of that.
>
> You only need to worry about routes if the machines are on different
> subnets.

Well, the machine I'm using right now has two built-in network
adapters (ethernet and wifi), so there has to be some routing
happening somewhere.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 9:48:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<denglish48060@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1111602285.319923.276810@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
> like to know the best method to connecting the two together without the
> use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
> serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>

1. cross over LAN cable
2. USB-USB data cable
3. Serial cable
March 23, 2005 10:11:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin <http://phr.cx@nospam.invalid&gt; wrote:
: "jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net> writes:
: > > Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
: > > like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
: > > the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
: > > serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
: >
: > Google "ethernet crossover cable"/ Basically, it's just a normal Cat5
: > cable with the send and receive reversed.

: Well, there's further questions, like where are the IP addresses
: supposed to come from if there's no router serving DHCP? Maybe W2k
: Pro takes care of that, I don't know. Note also that most laptops
: these days (especially those with gigabit ethernet) support MDI so
: they don't need crossover cables.

Make it a TCP/IP network. Just use reserved local IP addresses, such
as 192.168.xxx.xxx.

Assign one laptop as 192.168.0.1 and one as 192.168.0.2. These will
not conflict with the internet.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 10:34:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

jakdedert wrote:
> denglish48060@gmail.com wrote:
>> Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
>> like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
>> the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
>> serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>
> Google "ethernet crossover cable"
>
> Basically, it's just a normal Cat5 cable with the send and receive
> reversed. Plug one end into each computer...much, much faster than
> serial. You'll need to set up the normal network protocols in each
> laptop and designate a workgroup as you would with a router or hub.

No, you only need to run the Network Wizard in W2K or XP and stipulate that
this is an "ad-hoc" network.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 10:34:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JHEM wrote:

> jakdedert wrote:
>> denglish48060@gmail.com wrote:
>>> Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
>>> like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
>>> the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
>>> serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>>
>> Google "ethernet crossover cable"
>>
>> Basically, it's just a normal Cat5 cable with the send and receive
>> reversed. Plug one end into each computer...much, much faster than
>> serial. You'll need to set up the normal network protocols in each
>> laptop and designate a workgroup as you would with a router or hub.
>
> No, you only need to run the Network Wizard in W2K or XP and stipulate
> that this is an "ad-hoc" network.

Which is fine if you're using wifi. But you still need to designate a
workgroup.

> Regards,
>
> James

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 11:18:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:

> "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
>> > True. What about routes? Anyway it looks like Windows has some built
>> > in widget for taking care of that.
>>
>> You only need to worry about routes if the machines are on different
>> subnets.
>
> Well, the machine I'm using right now has two built-in network
> adapters (ethernet and wifi), so there has to be some routing
> happening somewhere.

Not if you're connecting to _one_ other machine.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 23, 2005 11:18:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
> > Well, the machine I'm using right now has two built-in network
> > adapters (ethernet and wifi), so there has to be some routing
> > happening somewhere.
>
> Not if you're connecting to _one_ other machine.

Huh? The OS needs to know which interface to send packets to. That's
routing.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 12:09:23 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The answer is that you have to statically manually assign them. Use

192.168.1.n

where n can be anything from 1 to 254. Set the subnet mask to

255.255.255.0



Paul Rubin wrote:

> "jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net> writes:
>
>>>Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
>>>like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
>>>the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
>>>serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>>
>>Google "ethernet crossover cable"/ Basically, it's just a normal Cat5
>>cable with the send and receive reversed.
>
>
> Well, there's further questions, like where are the IP addresses
> supposed to come from if there's no router serving DHCP? Maybe W2k
> Pro takes care of that, I don't know. Note also that most laptops
> these days (especially those with gigabit ethernet) support MDI so
> they don't need crossover cables.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 12:23:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The answer is that you have to statically manually assign them. Use

192.168.1.n

where n can be anything from 1 to 254. Set the subnet mask to

255.255.255.0



Paul Rubin wrote:

> "jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net> writes:
>
>>>Have two dell c-600 laptops that have built in LAN sockets and would
>>>like to know the best method to connecting the two together without
>>>the use of a router? Am using Windows 2000 Pro on both. Have heard of
>>>serial cable, any advantages or disadvantages... Many thanks...
>>
>>Google "ethernet crossover cable"/ Basically, it's just a normal Cat5
>>cable with the send and receive reversed.
>
>
> Well, there's further questions, like where are the IP addresses
> supposed to come from if there's no router serving DHCP? Maybe W2k
> Pro takes care of that, I don't know. Note also that most laptops
> these days (especially those with gigabit ethernet) support MDI so
> they don't need crossover cables.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 12:47:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:

> "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
>> > Well, the machine I'm using right now has two built-in network
>> > adapters (ethernet and wifi), so there has to be some routing
>> > happening somewhere.
>>
>> Not if you're connecting to _one_ other machine.
>
> Huh? The OS needs to know which interface to send packets to. That's
> routing.

If you only have one machine connected, it doesn't make any difference which
interface it sends packets to, they all end up te same place.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 12:47:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
> > Huh? The OS needs to know which interface to send packets to. That's
> > routing.
>
> If you only have one machine connected, it doesn't make any difference which
> interface it sends packets to, they all end up te same place.

Of course it matters. Only one of the interfaces is connected to
another machine. Sending packets to the other interface simply drops
those packets on the floor.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 6:44:40 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

J. Clarke wrote:
> JHEM wrote:
>> No, you only need to run the Network Wizard in W2K or XP and
>> stipulate that this is an "ad-hoc" network.
>
> Which is fine if you're using wifi. But you still need to designate a
> workgroup.

You're absolutely right John, I meant to say Direct Cable Connection wizard.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 10:26:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Paul Rubin wrote:

> "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> writes:
>> > Huh? The OS needs to know which interface to send packets to. That's
>> > routing.
>>
>> If you only have one machine connected, it doesn't make any difference
>> which interface it sends packets to, they all end up te same place.
>
> Of course it matters. Only one of the interfaces is connected to
> another machine. Sending packets to the other interface simply drops
> those packets on the floor.

You seem to have some serious misconceptions about the way that networks
function. If there is nothing connected to an interface then packets do
not get sent to that interface. This has nothing to do with routing.
Bridges accomplish this just fine. But the origin machine will not send
packets to a dead interface regardless. This is handled at Layer 2, not 3.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 24, 2005 10:27:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JHEM wrote:

> J. Clarke wrote:
>> JHEM wrote:
>>> No, you only need to run the Network Wizard in W2K or XP and
>>> stipulate that this is an "ad-hoc" network.
>>
>> Which is fine if you're using wifi. But you still need to designate a
>> workgroup.
>
> You're absolutely right John, I meant to say Direct Cable Connection
> wizard.

Didn't even know that there was one. Might be simpler than setting up from
Network Properties.

> Regards,
>
> James

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
!