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Will my build work?

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February 16, 2011 5:29:52 PM

Im mostly concerned with the power source and the water cooler. Everything else I think will work fine.

Any advice or revisions I should make?

Case: Thermaltake Element-T Mid-Tower Case [+11] (Original Color)

Extra Case Fan Upgrade: Maximum 120MM Case Cooling Fans for your selected case [+9]

CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-960 3.20 GHz 8M Intel Smart Cache LGA1366

Cooling Fan: CoolerMaster V6 CPU Cooler (Copper Base Double-V Heatpipe)

Motherboard: (2-Way SLI Support) Asus Sabertooth Intel X58 Chipset SLI/CrossFireX Mainboard Triple-Channel DDR3 FCLGA1366 ATX Mainboard w/ 7.1 HD Audio, GbLAN, USB3.0, SATA-III, SATA-II RAID, 2 Gen2 PCIe, 1 PCIe X1 & 1 PCI (All Venom OC Certified)

Memory: 6GB (2GBx3) DDR3/1600MHz Triple Channel Memory Module (Corsair or Major Brand)

Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 1GB 16X PCIe Video Card (EVGA Powered by NVIDIA)

Power Supply Upgrade: * 750 Watts - Corsair CMPSU-750TX 80 Plus Power Supply - Quad SLI Ready

Hard Drive: 500GB SATA-II 3.0Gb/s 16MB Cache 7200RPM HDD [-18] (Single Hard Drive)

Optical Drive: Sony 24X Double Layer Dual Format DVD+-R/+-RW + CD-R/RW Drive [+3] (BLACK COLOR)

Sound: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO

More about : build work

February 16, 2011 5:47:54 PM

Besides to not buy from Cyberpower?

To start, you're buying old tech. The old X58 chipset has been replaced by Sandy Bridge (despite the motherboard design flaw that's taking all SB parts off the market for now). Not only is SB a good $150 cheaper, it's also a good 20-30% faster. Put it this way. The i7-930/950's replacement, the i7-2600K, is $330, but it's just as fast as the i7-980X. It's an astonomical leap forward, and to build on anything except SB would be a HUGE mistake (excluding low budget machines).

Second, you've got a lower quality board. MSI is second or third tier in terms of quality behind Asus, Gigabyte and ASRock.

Third, you've got an older GPU that is a horrible choice. The 480 eats up a lot of power and is extremely expensive. You'd do better to get anything from ATI or one of the newer GTX 460 or GTX 5xx cards. They might not have as high of performance (depending on the card), but they'll be a lot cheaper, run a lot cooler and won't cost you nearly $100 a year on your power bill (check out Tom's article for today).

Fourth, Raidmax PSUs are crap. Don't even touch them. I wouldn't trust high end parts to a PSU that isn't from Antec, Corsair, Silverstone, SeaSonic or XFX.

Finally, liquid cooling is worthless. You can get just as good cooling with an air cooler at a fraction of the cost and none of the risk.

I HIGHLY recommend not bothering with a "custom" vendor. You should instead build it yourself. You'll easily save hundreds, get more performance, get a lot higher quality parts, and not have to deal with shoddy workmanship. I'm guessing this setup is going to cost you $1,200-$1,300. Here's a better build for around that:

CPU: i5-2500K $225 (once it's available again)
Mobo: ASRock P67 Extreme4 $153 (once it's available again)
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws X 2x2 GB 1600 mhz CAS Latency 7 $65
HDD: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1 TB $65 (or less, if you shop around)
PSU: XFX Black Edition 850W 80+ Silver[/url] $110 after rebate
Case: HAF 922 $100
Optical: Cheap SATA DVD burner. Under $20
HSF: Scythe Mugen 2 Rev. B (SCMG-2100) $40
GPU: GTX 560 Ti $225 after rebate or HD 6950 2 GB $260 after rebate (flash the BIOS to make it an HD 6970) or GTX 570 $310 after rebate or GTX 580 $490
OS: Windows 7 Home 64-bit OEM $95

Total: $1,098 with the GTX 560 or $1,133 with the HD 6950 or $1,183 with the GTX 570 or $1,363 with the GTX 580. Whichever of those fits the budget. That's without combos and other deals. If I looked around, it would likely be cheaper.
February 16, 2011 5:49:55 PM

Cyberpower's builds are OK. But they are more interested in getting your money than getting you a good bargain.

What size/resolution monitor will you be using?
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February 16, 2011 5:51:55 PM

Yes, it will work, but why the i7 960? It's much more expensive than the i7 950 with only a minor boost in clock speed and seeing as how you're opting for a water cooling unit, won't you be overclocking anyway?

You also might want to consider just waiting for Sandy Bridge CPUs and motherboards to resurface because they run cooler, overclock higher, and are faster.

Raidmax, not sure about the quality of their PSUs. I don't know who makes them. I'd feel confident in ordering a Corsair, Antec, Seasonic, or XFX Black Edition power supply for maximum stability.

February 16, 2011 5:52:16 PM

MA;
Your Gold Home Brew badge looks .... tarnished? That's pretty #%#$%!
February 16, 2011 6:07:02 PM

OK I edited the build to reflect some of the suggestions. This is getting towards the high end of my budget as I still need to buy the monitor and the OS. OS will be windows 7 professional 64bit. Monitor will be 1920 X 1080 resolution.

I don't have the confidence yet to build my own system id consider myself a novice at best with some knowledge. I will not be over clocking this system at least now right now anyways.

Is this a better set up? I'd like to get the best i can within budget as this is a present to myself for graduating college. Budget is 1300 at most.
February 16, 2011 6:09:46 PM

What feature of Win7 Pro do you need that isn't in Win7 Home Premium?
February 16, 2011 6:13:15 PM

@WR2: I know. It's been like that forever and nobody seems to have an answer as to why...

@zoltar: You'll be fine as long as you read up on what to expect. The building guide found through the stickies at the top of the forum is an excellent one. (EDIT: WR2 linked to it)

As for your changes, I'd drop the extra case fan, as it's completely unnecessary. I'd also keep the optical drive at whatever comes standard. There is no difference in the various brands and models, so why pay even $3 more?

I'd still recommend at least waiting for Sandy Bridge to be re-released. You'll get a 20-30% performance boost (i7-2600) and save $150 or so OR get the same CPU performance (i5-2500) and save $250 or so. It's win-win.

In case you're wondering, the design flaw dealt with the SATA ports. Also, it's an issue that was only demonstrated in Intel's labs, as it would take around three years to manifest. The bigger issue is that you can't find P67 motherboards any more and no one knows what happens with the warranty if you buy it with the known flaw.
February 16, 2011 6:16:22 PM

MadAdmiral said:

I HIGHLY recommend not bothering with a "custom" vendor. You should instead build it yourself. You'll easily save hundreds, get more performance, get a lot higher quality parts, and not have to deal with shoddy workmanship. I'm guessing this setup is going to cost you $1,200-$1,300. Here's a better build for around that:

CPU: i5-2500K $225 (once it's available again)
Mobo: ASRock P67 Extreme4 $153 (once it's available again)
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws X 2x2 GB 1600 mhz CAS Latency 7 $65
HDD: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1 TB $65 (or less, if you shop around)
PSU: XFX Black Edition 850W 80+ Silver $110 after rebate
Case: HAF 922 $100
Optical: Cheap SATA DVD burner. Under $20
HSF: Scythe Mugen 2 Rev. B (SCMG-2100) $40
GPU: GTX 560 Ti $225 after rebate or HD 6950 2 GB $260 after rebate (flash the BIOS to make it an HD 6970) or GTX 570 $310 after rebate or GTX 580 $490
OS: Windows 7 Home 64-bit OEM $95

Total: $1,098 with the GTX 560 or $1,133 with the HD 6950 or $1,183 with the GTX 570 or $1,363 with the GTX 580. Whichever of those fits the budget. That's without combos and other deals. If I looked around, it would likely be cheaper.
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Wow that is a great setup and looks to be well within my price range. I am not in a hurry to buy right now I am shopping around. I like what you have suggested and I suppose I could wait for the new intel chips and boards to be re-released especially if it will save me $200-$300 all set up. Again I just want something to play the latest games on as I have been stuck with an dell laptop that is only good for writing papers and surfing the net :p 
February 16, 2011 6:22:10 PM

@wr2 I can get a mean student discount on windows 7 professional it will only cost me $64 so why not.

@MadAdmiral I am going to wait as I have heard that intel has already started shipping the revised versions out. Shouldn't take long for the new chips and boards to come out now. I will be ordering everything if all the parts are available early march.

What kind of performance can i expect from a build like you suggested? If you don't mind me asking.
February 16, 2011 6:51:03 PM

The re-release of SB isn't really expected until April, but no one really knows.

As for performance, it'd be really good. I can't cite any numbers off the top of my head, but you could look up benchmarks for the GPUs and get a good idea. You'd likely get a few more FPS with SB, but it won't be significantly different. I do know that pretty much every game will get playable rates (40 FPS average or 30 FPS minimum) at 1080p resolutions with the details turned all the way up.
February 16, 2011 7:16:45 PM

@ MadAdmiral; 'they' blame everything they can't explain on the UK server. But they're probably right. See my post in your topic in the Forum Feedback section.

February 18, 2011 1:43:24 PM

Ok so I've been thinking if I'm not doing any sort video rendering or overclocking for a while would the i5 760 be a good alternative? What board would be good also?


I just don't want to wait till late march or April for the new mobos to come out. :( 
February 18, 2011 1:57:26 PM

The i5 is great gaming CPU. I'd definitely consider it. As for a board to pair with it, I like the Asus P7P55D-E Pro and ASRock P55 Extreme4.

I would still highly recommend waiting on Sandy Bridge. The i5-2500K will be $225. It's a good 20-30% faster than the i5-760 that's only $15 cheaper. The extra speed of the 2500K makes it faster than the old i7 quad cores. In addtion, the P67 motherboard are only about $10 more expensive than the P55 boards. You'd be getting a 20-30%+ speed increased for only $25 more. That's an amazing return.

That April date is just a guess. I'd be willing to bet that we'll be seeing new boards out there well before then.
February 18, 2011 2:08:49 PM

What is the resell value on the i5 760 and a corresponding board. Is their even a market for them now used? I could always upgrade when the new ones come out. I have a hard time holding on to money so I'm afraid I'll spend some or most o it before the new boards come out.
February 18, 2011 2:19:38 PM

I see 775 systems selling on Ebay even now.

You could find a buyer who doesn't know about Sandy Bridge yet.
Or your sales listing might get bypassed by people opting for the new items unless you push the price below what you paid for it.

Controlling your impulse spending my work out best for you in the long run.





February 18, 2011 2:24:43 PM

The problem with upgrading when SB comes out is that immediately on the availability of SB, the old i5s will take a big hit. I have a formula for computing value of used parts.

First, you get the current new price of the components. I'd project that you'd lose 25% of the value of the i5/P55 just from SB being released, bringing those combos WR2 posted to roughly $260 and $280. Then, multiply that total cost by 80% for being bought, lowering the value to $210 and $225. Finally, subtract 20% of that value for every two months used. That leaves you with $170-180.

In addtion to that, you'd need to add $100 for the OS. If you bought a full retail version that can be moved from build to build, you'd pay roughly $100 over the cost of a single OEM version. Or if you decide to buy two OEM versions that are tied to the motherboard, you'd still be out around $100.

So I guess the real question is whether waiting a month and a half is worth $270-$280 to you. It would be for me.

Of course, that all assumes you're selling to somone with some knowledge of computer components. If you find a complete idiot, you could get more. Still, you'd be out $100+ (the OS) for not waiting a short time, so I still don't think it's worth it. This is especially true when you consider that you'll have time to find the best deals on the various parts. You'd also find more savings by letting the other parts age a little.
February 18, 2011 2:45:47 PM

Sigh... Your right. Should I go ahead and buy the case though? It's $10 dollars off the regular price I can already buy the i5 2500 the only thing not out is the mobo. I think I'll just put the money into a separate savings account.
February 18, 2011 2:53:49 PM

You have the President's day sales going on now. You can look for deals if you want.
Just remember, you'll have the bigger Easter sales to go through a bit closer in to the SB availability.
February 18, 2011 2:55:43 PM

The case isn't likely to change much in price or be defective, so it's probably safe to buy it in advance. I wouldn't buy the CPU until you can buy the board. You can't tell if it's bad without the other parts, so it'd be better to test it when you can still return it.
February 18, 2011 3:09:27 PM

Ok I ordered the case. It's got great reviews so thank you for recommending it. I've read into the whole process of building a pc and it does not look hard. The only part that worries me is placing the CPU into the baord as it's supposed to be really easily broken if not installed properly.
February 18, 2011 3:28:52 PM

It's actually easier than you imagine as long as everything goes right.
There are no more 'pins' to get bent like in the old days so it's much harder to mess up a CPU install.
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