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EYE-ONE DISPLAY 2

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February 3, 2005 3:21:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi all!

Anyone using the Eye-One Display 2?
(http://na.i1color.com/index.cfm/MenuItemID/126.htm)
I was toying with the idea but I'm not sure how good it is. I run a Pentium
IV, 3.20 Mhz, with 1 gig of ram, WindowsXp Home. Monitor is a Viewsonic 19''
LCD.
What does it do exactly? Allows the monitor to show "proper colours"? - as
compared to what? Finally, does it help in getting the printer to print as
it's seen on the LCD?

Thanks for any help you might bring.

Marcel

More about : eye display

Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 3, 2005 3:21:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Anyone using the Eye-One Display 2?
>I was toying with the idea but I'm not sure how good it is.

It's probably the best monitor calibration tool available right now in
this price range (ie, compared to the Monaco and ColorVision Spyder
solutions).

>­I run a Pentium IV, 3.20 Mhz, with 1 gig of ram, WindowsXp
>Home. Monitor is ­a Viewsonic 19'' LCD.

What photo-editing software do you use? If you're using something that
recognizes monitor ICC profiles then it's very useful to calibrate and
characterize your monitor. If your editing app isn't color-managed
then it's mostly a waste of money.

>What does it do exactly?

Goes thru some steps to set your monitor's black and white points,
contrast and color temperature. This is the 'calibrate' stage and it's
useful even if your apps aren't color-managed. Once this is done the
software displays known color values on your screen and the puck
measures them and creates an ICC profile that tells the apps how to
change the color values in your files to give you the best color match.

>Finally, does it help in getting the print­er to print as
>it's seen on the LCD?

Nope, it's a monitor calibration tool. They sell something else (list
is $1,500, you can find it for $1,000 usually) that lets you print a
target and takes measurements off that and generates an ICC profile for
the printer/paper/ink combo, but that's another story.

> Thanks for any help you might bring.

These links might help ...

http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/13605.html
http://www.creativepro.com/story/review/19760.html

Bill
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 3, 2005 3:21:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> I use Photoshop CS. I guess the ICC would fit right in.

Marcel, did you run the Adobe Gamma monitor calibration applet with CS?
If you did, then it does the same thing that the Eye-One does, except
instead of eye-balling the squares etc to do the calibration (like
Gamma) the Eye-One package measures the colors, which is much more
accurate.

Basically if you ran Gamma and feel you are getting a good color match
then there's no need to plunk down the bucks for a hardware calibration
tool, but if you want a better color match then it's worth getting
something like the Eye-One. I could never quite get the desired
results with Gamma but as soon as I got a puck I got a much closer
match between screen and print (once you have good ICC profiles for the
printer).

Bill
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February 3, 2005 5:28:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks, Bill!

I use Photoshop CS. I guess the ICC would fit right in. I also use Qimage
wherer the ICC would play.
Marcel


"Bill Hilton" <bhilton665@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1107452538.204326.256110@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>Anyone using the Eye-One Display 2?
>I was toying with the idea but I'm not sure how good it is.

It's probably the best monitor calibration tool available right now in
this price range (ie, compared to the Monaco and ColorVision Spyder
solutions).

>I run a Pentium IV, 3.20 Mhz, with 1 gig of ram, WindowsXp
>Home. Monitor is a Viewsonic 19'' LCD.

What photo-editing software do you use? If you're using something that
recognizes monitor ICC profiles then it's very useful to calibrate and
characterize your monitor. If your editing app isn't color-managed
then it's mostly a waste of money.

>What does it do exactly?

Goes thru some steps to set your monitor's black and white points,
contrast and color temperature. This is the 'calibrate' stage and it's
useful even if your apps aren't color-managed. Once this is done the
software displays known color values on your screen and the puck
measures them and creates an ICC profile that tells the apps how to
change the color values in your files to give you the best color match.

>Finally, does it help in getting the printer to print as
>it's seen on the LCD?

Nope, it's a monitor calibration tool. They sell something else (list
is $1,500, you can find it for $1,000 usually) that lets you print a
target and takes measurements off that and generates an ICC profile for
the printer/paper/ink combo, but that's another story.

> Thanks for any help you might bring.

These links might help ...

http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/13605.html
http://www.creativepro.com/story/review/19760.html

Bill
February 3, 2005 9:16:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thank you Bill!
Your advice is very wise. I find now that I really don't need it for what I
do. As it is, eye-balling it with Gamma (although it's not supposed to work
with an LCD), I get pretty close results between what I see on screen and
what I get printed. I thought somehow, I could get even better results. But
as they say: "If it ain't broke, don't repair it" ;-)
Best regards,
Marcel

"Bill Hilton" <bhilton665@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1107460971.491874.240920@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> > I use Photoshop CS. I guess the ICC would fit right in.
>
> Marcel, did you run the Adobe Gamma monitor calibration applet with CS?
> If you did, then it does the same thing that the Eye-One does, except
> instead of eye-balling the squares etc to do the calibration (like
> Gamma) the Eye-One package measures the colors, which is much more
> accurate.
>
> Basically if you ran Gamma and feel you are getting a good color match
> then there's no need to plunk down the bucks for a hardware calibration
> tool, but if you want a better color match then it's worth getting
> something like the Eye-One. I could never quite get the desired
> results with Gamma but as soon as I got a puck I got a much closer
> match between screen and print (once you have good ICC profiles for the
> printer).
>
> Bill
>
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 4, 2005 1:23:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 3 Feb 2005 12:21:48 -0500, "Marcel" <cosmar@rogers.com> wrote:

>Hi all!
>
>Anyone using the Eye-One Display 2?
>(http://na.i1color.com/index.cfm/MenuItemID/126.htm)
>I was toying with the idea but I'm not sure how good it is. I run a Pentium
>IV, 3.20 Mhz, with 1 gig of ram, WindowsXp Home. Monitor is a Viewsonic 19''
>LCD.
>What does it do exactly? Allows the monitor to show "proper colours"? - as
>compared to what? Finally, does it help in getting the printer to print as
>it's seen on the LCD?
>
>Thanks for any help you might bring.


It's a great tool. No problems. Works fine
with either CRT or LCD.

Getting printer to match monitor may take
a bit more work, but getting the monitor
calibrated and profiled is a good first step.


rafe b.
http://www.terrapinphoto.com
!