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RATE MY SYSTEM

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February 20, 2011 6:32:00 AM

MY NEW BUILD RATE MY PC 1-10.. IF YOU WISH LEAVE ONLY WHATS NEGATIVE ABOUT THE SYSTEM AND WHAT YOU WOULD CHANGE OR TWEEK.

CASE: Antec DF-85 Black Computer Case

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge

RAM: G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)



GPU: ASUS EAH6950/2DI2S/2GD5 Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

GPU: ASUS EAH6950/2DI2S/2GD5 Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity

DRIVE: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s

DRIVE: OCZ Vertex 2 OCZSSD2-2VTXE60G 2.5" 60GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

MONITER: BenQ LCD XL2410T

MOTHERBOARD: asus p8p67 pro

PSU: XFX Black Edition P1-750B-CAG9 750W ATX12V v2.2 / ESP12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

REGARDS SLEAZY

More about : rate system

February 20, 2011 7:08:03 AM

That is quite a decent build, though I would recommend some changes based on the components and the amount of money you plan to spend.

Your graphics cards are going to be bottlenecked by the motherboard, as it only supports CrossFire at x16/x4, which means that one card will be operating at 100% while the other only runs at 25%.

Look at something like the Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7 (or simmilar) because it offers two PCI-E x16 running at x16 slots, which will draw the most out of your cards.

Also, you may wish to consider a more powerful powersupply. I would say at least an 850W, but more if you have the money and want to be safe. Maybe something like the Corsair TX-850 or TX-950?

Another thing you could add is additional cooling. Seeing as you are getting the i7-2600K and not the 2600, you will be over clocking it. That generally demands an aftermarket CPU cooler. Also, the case in general could use with a few extra fans.

Your data hard drive is only a SATA2 3.0Gb/s drive, though all new motherboards support SATA3 6.0Gb/s connections. That will literally double the speed of your hard drive when doing things like gaming.

Aside from that, everything else should be fine. No, more than that, it will be awesome.

Good luck,
-Klosteral
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February 20, 2011 7:28:59 AM


That looks like a very nice setup, and your motherboard do support dual x8, so you are good there.

Also there is no difference when running a single mechanical HDD on SATA2 or SATA3.

As to your PSU, the 750W you have chosen is enough, but I would personally go to a 850W just to give me peace of mind should the upgrade bug bite, and I actually would need that bit of extra power.

The after market cooler that Klosteral suggest I can only say yes, that has to be an omission on your part to not have it included.
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February 20, 2011 9:36:34 AM

Klosteral said:
That is quite a decent build, though I would recommend some changes based on the components and the amount of money you plan to spend.

Your graphics cards are going to be bottlenecked by the motherboard, as it only supports CrossFire at x16/x4, which means that one card will be operating at 100% while the other only runs at 25%.

Look at something like the Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7 (or simmilar) because it offers two PCI-E x16 running at x16 slots, which will draw the most out of your cards.

Also, you may wish to consider a more powerful powersupply. I would say at least an 850W, but more if you have the money and want to be safe. Maybe something like the Corsair TX-850 or TX-950?

Another thing you could add is additional cooling. Seeing as you are getting the i7-2600K and not the 2600, you will be over clocking it. That generally demands an aftermarket CPU cooler. Also, the case in general could use with a few extra fans.

Your data hard drive is only a SATA2 3.0Gb/s drive, though all new motherboards support SATA3 6.0Gb/s connections. That will literally double the speed of your hard drive when doing things like gaming.

Aside from that, everything else should be fine. No, more than that, it will be awesome.

Good luck,
-Klosteral


You are severely misinformed about PCIE slots and the impact a x8 or x4 has on a given graphics card. It's not as simple as 16/4=4 therefore it's 25%...

Also as far as SATA2 vs SATA3, the width of the highway doesn't make my matrix go any faster. But if I was driving a Ferrari I'd appreciate the lack of traffic. Hope that clears it up.
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February 20, 2011 11:26:36 AM

That is more confusing. I was simply under the assumption that because the graphics card could operate at x16 but was only going to run at x4 then it was accessing data at only 1/4 what its potential was. I shortened that to mean "25%".

Assuming you are correct about this, can you please enlighten me so that I can not feed people any more misleading information?

-Klosteral
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Best solution

February 20, 2011 12:59:20 PM


Utilizing x8 instead of x16 only reduces the performance by a few percentages (generally, some games will spike and others show no difference at all).

Toms have done several articles about this over the years, here is one of the most recent articles.

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February 21, 2011 8:34:16 AM

Oh, ok. After reading through that article, much has been clarified. This will help me with my own builds as well, which is good.

Thanks,
-Klosteral
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September 4, 2011 10:30:12 AM

Best answer selected by sleazy.
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