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What CPU for video ripping

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May 22, 2011 1:43:30 PM

I have a huge collection of dvd's and want to rip them fast into Divx/AVI with DVDFab.

I am not interested in playing games and ripping into hd mkv is also not an issue (still many cheap mediaplayers don't support mkv). So, rippig into plain old divx/xvid AVI is good enough.

The main reason for the ripping is simple: having some fun during travelling and when I lend some dvd's to my family it's easier and safer to give them a stick with the avi in stead of the original dvd.

Mainly for that purpose I want to build a new system and I wonder which CPU serves best: Intel or AMD (Phenom II 6X)?
I have already 16 GB of DDR3 1333 RAM and want to use Windows 7 64-bit as OS. I have also a spare nVidia GeForce 9400 GT video card I can use. I'm told that using DVDFab ripping can take advantage using CUDA, but I'm also told that there ase still several issues with CUDA, so I am not intended to go for another video card.

The Phenom II X6 1090T is one of the possibilities, but am I gaining substantial time going for an Intel? And if so, which one? Of course, given the situation that my budget isn't endless (whoes is???). I live in Belgium so I have some prices in euro's. I can have the AMD Phenom II X6 1090T for 159 euro's and if it is worth the price, I want to spent a little more for an Intel, but 200 euro is the max because I want also to have a motherboard with native SATA III 600 and USB 3.0. (Suggestions on this one are also welcome).

Any suggestions?

Thanks for the input.

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a c 108 à CPUs
May 23, 2011 12:46:39 PM

I am not familiar with the specific capabilities of DVDFab and its compression techniques, but here is what I have discovered:

Screw compression :lol: 

I can put 120-150 uncompressed DVDs on a 1TB HDD (formatted capacity of 930GB). Mechanical HDDs are outrageously cheap these days. So are thumbdrives.

When not converting/compressing, ripping archival copies of your DVDs is also incredibly fast; a simple task for nearly any processor with time measured in brief minutes.

And I'm not the intellectual property police or anything (and I have no problems with your personal use of archival copies) but you may want to be careful with pronouncing your 'lending practices' in a public forum ...


:ouch: 
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May 23, 2011 3:45:01 PM

> When not converting/compressing, ripping archival copies of your DVDs is also incredibly fast; a simple task for nearly any processor with time measured in brief minutes.

I think that is very exagerated. Ripping in Divx/AVI a movie of about 2 hours takes 30 minuts on a laptop with Intel i7 Q740 proc, 4 GB Ram DDR3 1333, Win7 64-bit (Dell Latitude E6510). Making an DVD9 ISO of the same movie takes more or less the same time (35 min). Half an hour is not quite "brief minutes".
And I tried on several DualCore systems and there the time is about 45 till 50 minutes. So I want some faster solutions but I get several different input. Some people say "go for Intel all the way". Others say "the more cores, the better" and in that respect AMD Phenom II X6 is the way to go.
So I'm still confused.
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a c 108 à CPUs
May 23, 2011 9:00:32 PM

micorleone said:
> When not converting/compressing, ripping archival copies of your DVDs is also incredibly fast; a simple task for nearly any processor with time measured in brief minutes.

I think that is very exagerated. Ripping in Divx/AVI a movie of about 2 hours takes 30 minuts on a laptop with Intel i7 Q740 proc, 4 GB Ram DDR3 1333, Win7 64-bit (Dell Latitude E6510). Making an DVD9 ISO of the same movie takes more or less the same time (35 min). Half an hour is not quite "brief minutes".
And I tried on several DualCore systems and there the time is about 45 till 50 minutes. So I want some faster solutions but I get several different input. Some people say "go for Intel all the way". Others say "the more cores, the better" and in that respect AMD Phenom II X6 is the way to go.
So I'm still confused.


It's not exaggerated at all. You are not listening to what I am saying or/and you must be doing it wrong.

Once again ---- do not 'rip' to DivX. Do not convert or compress the audio and video in any fashion.

Simply 'rip' the video and audio with it's original folders and VOB containers without compression or conversion. It's that easy, and it does take only a few short minutes (even when 'breaking' encryption for your 'fair use' personal copy).

At the Egg 1TB, drives are $55US. From ScanUK they are £40 with VAT. It's like they are giving them away.

When formatted a 1TB HDD will hold 130-150 uncompressed DVDs dependent upon whether the archived DVDs are single- or double-layer. It will be much more than 150 DVDs if your movies are primarily single-layer.

Simply map your media HDD(s) as network shares. Create a Shortcut to the VTS_01_0.IFO file in the VIDEO_TS folder of the movie. Build a folder 'Library' of Shortcuts - organize to your (and your partner's) liking. Copy your Library folder to each computer on your network ...

Then launch movies with a single click from any computer on your network :D 
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May 24, 2011 6:20:26 AM

Ah! Sorry, I got it wrong. You mean using a tool that copies all the stuff inclusive the file structure into folders on the hard drive. DVDSchrink does this trick I think, but maybe there are several other and newer tools out there that are better.

But that's not what I want, because that would be a good solution only for streaming from a network or one centralised media player. 2 TB disks are the best buy for the buck these days for storing large amounts of data. At Alternate for example a 2 TB Samsung only costs 65 euro and a WD 68 euro. So that is not the problem. Following your calculations I can get about 250 dvd's uncompressed on one 2 TB drive (most dvd's are in fact double layer). But I think I still have to buy 4 or 5 hard disks... Also, having all the file structure of the dvd is too complex to have it on a stick or moving to a small netbook. Therefor it should be much easier: one movie = one file (divx/avi or ISO) or one episode of a series show = one file. In that case I can store about 1.000 dvd's on one 2 TB drive in stead of switching between five drives.

I'm still intended to using the original dvd's when I really want to see a movie in all it's glory: on a big plasma Panasonic screen with my DTS 5.1 sound system. The copiying/ripping is only for backup purposes. That's the reason why it should be easy to manage when I want to grab a few episodes or movies on a stick in stead of copying a whole folder (with the title of the movie) and the whole folder structure (IFO, VOB, ...). Viewing a movie/tv-show on the move is never of the same quality on a laptop/netbook. So a compressed container/file format will do. That's the reason I really want to convert the dvd's in stead of simply "copy" them to a hard disk.

But I'm still stuck about the CPU: Intel or AMD Phenom X6...
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