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PCMCIA Card problem

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 25, 2005 1:58:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have a question about PCMCIA card. Can I pull out the card when the
notebook is still on just like USB slot? if I did that for several times,
will it damage the mother board or card? Thanks for your help!

More about : pcmcia card problem

March 27, 2005 10:22:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Joe Kwan wrote:
> I have a question about PCMCIA card. Can I pull out the card when the

> notebook is still on just like USB slot? if I did that for several
times,
> will it damage the mother board or card? Thanks for your help!

Hello Joe
Yes, you can Hot Swap a pcmcia card, but windows may give you a
disconnected device warning window. I have several laptops and many
different peripherals that connect using pcmcia and I have never had a
problem.
However, I have never had external RAM on a card so I cannot speak to
how this would behave. I also have not used the pcmcia adaptor that
converts to USB ports, so I also do not know how this would behave.
Even though you may have, at worst case, a system crash there should be
no hardware damage.
signed Ed
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 28, 2005 12:55:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I do it quite often, unplug a USB 2 card and plug in a wireless card. I
haven't had any problems. Just so I wouldn't steer you wrong I did a search
and found info which confirms the hot-swapabilty of PCMCIA cards.

http://www.quatech.com/support/comm-over-pcmcia.php


"Joe Kwan" <airjoe@netvigator.com> wrote in message
news:D 1uki0$st22@imsp212.netvigator.com...
> I have a question about PCMCIA card. Can I pull out the card when the
> notebook is still on just like USB slot? if I did that for several times,
> will it damage the mother board or card? Thanks for your help!
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 28, 2005 10:46:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I must be doing something wrong also... when I stop my PC Card nic, I
can't re-insert it and have it start again -- you know, pick up an IP
address via DHCP again. Using Win XP Pro SP2.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 29, 2005 5:02:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

First, the correct terminology is "PC Card", not "PCMCIA Card".

Second, you are supposed to "stop" the card (which turns off power,
among other things) before you pull it out. You generally can get away
with just pulling it out, but not always, and it's not a recommended
practice. There should be an icon in the system tray to allow you to
"stop" the card. The pins on the connector are different lengths, so
ground connects first and disconnects last, then power, then signal.



Box134 wrote:

> I do it quite often, unplug a USB 2 card and plug in a wireless card. I
> haven't had any problems. Just so I wouldn't steer you wrong I did a search
> and found info which confirms the hot-swapabilty of PCMCIA cards.
>
> http://www.quatech.com/support/comm-over-pcmcia.php
>
>
> "Joe Kwan" <airjoe@netvigator.com> wrote in message
> news:D 1uki0$st22@imsp212.netvigator.com...
>
>>I have a question about PCMCIA card. Can I pull out the card when the
>>notebook is still on just like USB slot? if I did that for several times,
>>will it damage the mother board or card? Thanks for your help!
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 29, 2005 5:02:23 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

From the web site I quoted:

"Card & Socket Services

Functionally, a PCMCIA card can perform any memory or I/O operation so long
as it adheres to the PCMCIA interface structure. As shown in the figure
below, PCMCIA is a tiered system which uses a set of device independent
drivers to integrate any type of PCMCIA card into the host system. Socket
Services, the lowest tier in the architecture, provides a universal software
interface for the PCMCIA sockets themselves."

Guess you should let them know they're wrong. As for "stopping" the card, I
guess that's fine, but I wonder what "hot swapable" means if you have to
"stop" it?


"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4248AA4C.1050105@neo.rr.com...
> First, the correct terminology is "PC Card", not "PCMCIA Card".
>
> Second, you are supposed to "stop" the card (which turns off power, among
> other things) before you pull it out. You generally can get away with
> just pulling it out, but not always, and it's not a recommended practice.
> There should be an icon in the system tray to allow you to "stop" the
> card. The pins on the connector are different lengths, so ground connects
> first and disconnects last, then power, then signal.
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 29, 2005 11:02:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

They are wrong as to correct current useage, but anything written about
"card and socket services" was probably written more than a decade ago
and most likley simply hasn't been revised, since "card and socket
services" became unnecessary and essentially were frozen in 1995 (with
the introduction of Windows 95). The change in the name of the cards
from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC Cards" was made by PCMCIA (the ORGANIZATION
that sets the standard) sometime in the mid-1990's.


Box134 wrote:
> From the web site I quoted:
>
> "Card & Socket Services
>
> Functionally, a PCMCIA card can perform any memory or I/O operation so long
> as it adheres to the PCMCIA interface structure. As shown in the figure
> below, PCMCIA is a tiered system which uses a set of device independent
> drivers to integrate any type of PCMCIA card into the host system. Socket
> Services, the lowest tier in the architecture, provides a universal software
> interface for the PCMCIA sockets themselves."
>
> Guess you should let them know they're wrong. As for "stopping" the card, I
> guess that's fine, but I wonder what "hot swapable" means if you have to
> "stop" it?
>
>
> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:4248AA4C.1050105@neo.rr.com...
>
>>First, the correct terminology is "PC Card", not "PCMCIA Card".
>>
>>Second, you are supposed to "stop" the card (which turns off power, among
>>other things) before you pull it out. You generally can get away with
>>just pulling it out, but not always, and it's not a recommended practice.
>>There should be an icon in the system tray to allow you to "stop" the
>>card. The pins on the connector are different lengths, so ground connects
>>first and disconnects last, then power, then signal.
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 29, 2005 11:02:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Yes, looking through their web site confirms you are correct in calling then
"PC Cards."

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4249A756.2010408@neo.rr.com...
> The change in the name of the cards
> from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC Cards" was made by PCMCIA (the ORGANIZATION
> that sets the standard) sometime in the mid-1990's.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 30, 2005 1:52:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Which is really insane when you think about it. Since PC Card is a
generic term can mean any card that plugs into a personal computer. And
it is also often used for PCI cards as well. So nobody has no idea what
in the world you are talking about when you say "PC Card"! At least when
they say PCMCIA, you know exactly what they are talking about!


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000




"Box134" <box134@wooky.invalid> wrote in message
news:D Pi2e.1021$Mj.10432@news1.mts.net...
Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 14:23:38 -0600

Yes, looking through their web site confirms you are correct in
calling then "PC Cards."

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4249A756.2010408@neo.rr.com...
Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 19:02:12 GMT

> The change in the name of the cards
> from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC Cards" was made by PCMCIA (the ORGANIZATION
> that sets the standard) sometime in the mid-1990's.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 30, 2005 1:52:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
>Which is really insane when you think about it. Since PC Card is a
>generic term can mean any card that plugs into a personal computer.

Or, we could set the way-back machine to a time when it mean Printed
Circuit, and had nothing to do with computers. If the PCMCIA folks
(*) want to convince everyone it means PCMCIA card most folks will
pick it up from context...

* We all know that means People Can't Memorize Computer Industry
Acronyms, right? 8*)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 30, 2005 8:27:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

yes, well if you think that "PC Card" is inane becuase it could mean
anything, consider what "PCMCIA" actually means:

Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association

Now some history here is relevant: When the cards and the industry were
first created, they were memory cards, and they were not accessories
like "compact flash", they were the MAIN memory (RAM) of many notebooks.
Those notebooks had no other memory -- the "PCMCIA" memory card was
IT. That was about 1989 to 1992.

By 1995, NO ONE was using these cards for memory any longer, although
they were (and are) used for everything else (modem, LAN, SCSI, CD-ROM,
serial and parallel port, scanners .... you name it, everything EXCEPT
memory).

So about a full decade ago, sometime in the mid-1990's, the organization
(which owns the standards and trademarks and has a legal right to
determine "correct" useage) changed the name from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC
Cards".

However, a full decade later, many people are still calling them "PCMCIA
cards", even though they are not memory cards in any sense of the word.


BillW50 wrote:
> Which is really insane when you think about it. Since PC Card is a
> generic term can mean any card that plugs into a personal computer. And
> it is also often used for PCI cards as well. So nobody has no idea what
> in the world you are talking about when you say "PC Card"! At least when
> they say PCMCIA, you know exactly what they are talking about!
>
>
> Cheers!
> ___________________________________________
> Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
> -- written and edited within Word 2000

>
> "Box134" <box134@wooky.invalid> wrote in message
> news:D Pi2e.1021$Mj.10432@news1.mts.net...
> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 14:23:38 -0600
>
> Yes, looking through their web site confirms you are correct in
> calling then "PC Cards."
>
> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:4249A756.2010408@neo.rr.com...
> Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 19:02:12 GMT
>
>
>>The change in the name of the cards
>>from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC Cards" was made by PCMCIA (the ORGANIZATION
>>that sets the standard) sometime in the mid-1990's.
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 30, 2005 8:27:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Personal Computer Miniature Card Interface Adapter

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:424A2CCA.4020005@neo.rr.com...
> yes, well if you think that "PC Card" is inane becuase it could mean
> anything, consider what "PCMCIA" actually means:
>
> Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association
>
> Now some history here is relevant: When the cards and the industry were
> first created, they were memory cards, and they were not accessories
> like "compact flash", they were the MAIN memory (RAM) of many notebooks.
> Those notebooks had no other memory -- the "PCMCIA" memory card was
> IT. That was about 1989 to 1992.
>
> By 1995, NO ONE was using these cards for memory any longer, although
> they were (and are) used for everything else (modem, LAN, SCSI, CD-ROM,
> serial and parallel port, scanners .... you name it, everything EXCEPT
> memory).
>
> So about a full decade ago, sometime in the mid-1990's, the organization
> (which owns the standards and trademarks and has a legal right to
> determine "correct" useage) changed the name from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC
> Cards".
>
> However, a full decade later, many people are still calling them "PCMCIA
> cards", even though they are not memory cards in any sense of the word.
>
>
> BillW50 wrote:
> > Which is really insane when you think about it. Since PC Card is a
> > generic term can mean any card that plugs into a personal computer. And
> > it is also often used for PCI cards as well. So nobody has no idea what
> > in the world you are talking about when you say "PC Card"! At least when
> > they say PCMCIA, you know exactly what they are talking about!
> >
> >
> > Cheers!
> > ___________________________________________
> > Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
> > -- written and edited within Word 2000
>
> >
> > "Box134" <box134@wooky.invalid> wrote in message
> > news:D Pi2e.1021$Mj.10432@news1.mts.net...
> > Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 14:23:38 -0600
> >
> > Yes, looking through their web site confirms you are correct in
> > calling then "PC Cards."
> >
> > "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> > news:4249A756.2010408@neo.rr.com...
> > Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 19:02:12 GMT
> >
> >
> >>The change in the name of the cards
> >>from "PCMCIA Cards" to "PC Cards" was made by PCMCIA (the ORGANIZATION
> >>that sets the standard) sometime in the mid-1990's.
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b V Motherboard
March 30, 2005 9:53:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:424A2CCA.4020005@neo.rr.com...
Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 04:27:08 GMT

yes, well if you think that "PC Card" is inane becuase it could
mean anything, consider what "PCMCIA" actually means:

Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association

Think about such words like a driveway is something that you park on.
But a parkway is something that you drive on. There are tons of other
such phrases/words.

Now some history here is relevant: When the cards and the industry
were first created, they were memory cards, and they were not
accessories like "compact flash", they were the MAIN memory (RAM)
of many notebooks. Those notebooks had no other memory -- the
"PCMCIA" memory card was IT. That was about 1989 to 1992.

I have no problem with this at all. Although my '94 era Toshiba T1950CS
uses a memory card slot (only useful for memory cards) and also has
PCMCIA slots (which you call PC Cards).

By 1995, NO ONE was using these cards for memory any longer,
although they were (and are) used for everything else (modem, LAN,
SCSI, CD-ROM, serial and parallel port, scanners .... you name it,
everything EXCEPT memory).

Even so, PC Cards is a terrible label and true experts have no idea what
you are talking about with newbies being included.

So about a full decade ago, sometime in the mid-1990's, the
organization (which owns the standards and trademarks and has a
legal right to determine "correct" useage) changed the name from
"PCMCIA Cards" to "PC Cards".

I realize those who are picky about language, may feel their ideas are
the best! But throughout history the most important thing aside from
some basic rules and such is to be understood. And those who speak as to
be understood always win anyway. Regardless of those whom believe they
know better!

However, a full decade later, many people are still calling them
"PCMCIA cards", even though they are not memory cards in any sense
of the word.

That's nothing in time! It's been about 500 years now when we knew that
the sun stays put and the Earth rotates to give us the illusion that the
sun sets and rises. But the terminology has never been change. But
*everyone* knows exactly what they are talking about anyway. And that's
the most important thing of all!

Now as for the label as "PC Card", it is just too generic! And it is a
meaningless phrase! As it doesn't tell anybody anything! If they used
something like "Portable PC Card" or Laptop/Notebook PC Card or
something. That would have been unique. But calling it just a "PC Card"
was merely wishful thinking that will never past the test of time.


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
!