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Not a major issue but...

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February 24, 2011 4:40:19 AM

I recently built a brand new computer, and on occasion it will turn off, not shut down but rather turn completely off and then boot up again. In case it helps my build:

Intel core i7- 950
Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R
G.Skill PI 6Gb (3x2Gb)
MSI N460GTX Hawk Talon (x2)
Corsair CMPSU-750TX
Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ
Windows 7 Ultimate

More about : major issue

a b B Homebuilt system
February 24, 2011 4:47:28 AM

I'd disassemble it, reassemble it and double check connections.

I say this because when people "double check their connections" they sometimes forget certain connections.

So I'd tear it down and rebuild it. See if that helps.
February 24, 2011 5:02:37 AM

ok i'll try that and in case it helps here are temps
processor: 32-40 idle 44-48 load
mobo: 33-44 idle 42-48 load
video card 1: 31-32 idle 45-50 load
video card 2: 29-30 idle 31-32 load
all hard drives: 30-34 idle and load
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
February 24, 2011 5:29:09 AM

Your temps are fine. It needs to be torn down. I'd leave the HSF on the CPU but everything else needs to come out, then place it all back together. Also make sure to follow your MB manual precisely when hooking up your front panel connectors.
a c 122 B Homebuilt system
February 24, 2011 4:37:34 PM

How often does it happen? When does it happen?

Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
February 27, 2011 5:24:01 PM

This is quite a bit later but after completely tearing it down and putting it all back this is the first repeat of the problem. I will try the checklist suggested and see if anything comes up. here is the windows bluescreen error report:


Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: 3b
BCP1: 00000000C0000005
BCP2: FFFFF88004ED7533
BCP3: FFFFF8800CDA0530
BCP4: 0000000000000000
OS Version: 6_1_7600
Service Pack: 0_0
Product: 256_1

Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\022711-21169-01.dmp
C:\Users\DobyDude\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-250022-0.sysdata.xml

Read our privacy statement online:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=104288&clcid=0x0...

If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline:
C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt
February 27, 2011 7:11:11 PM

If it helps looking through the BIOS I found that the RAM was under-clocked would that have caused this? it was running at 1066Mhz and cas latency of 8 I changed it to the RAM's profile of 1600Mhz and cas latency of 7
a b B Homebuilt system
February 27, 2011 8:23:52 PM

Did you set the voltage correctly as well?
February 28, 2011 2:56:47 AM

yes the voltage is ok 1.5v it happened again this time while switching windows between wow and google chrome and here is the report:


Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: 116
BCP1: FFFFFA8008DD9010
BCP2: FFFFF88004EECE08
BCP3: FFFFFFFFC000009A
BCP4: 0000000000000004
OS Version: 6_1_7600
Service Pack: 0_0
Product: 256_1

Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\022711-19749-01.dmp
C:\Users\DobyDude\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-40607-0.sysdata.xml

Read our privacy statement online:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=104288&clcid=0x0...

If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline:
C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt
March 2, 2011 4:07:23 AM

I think the problem was fixed. Windows decided to finally tell me what the shutdowns were actually about, there were incompatible drivers. For some reason windows refused to find driver updates, Gigabyte on the other hand sent me to driveragent.com where I found that several drivers were critically out of date, including the video card and audio card. I think updating these has fixed the problem at least I have not seen an irregular shutdown yet. Thank you all for the advice and maybe my situation can help newbies at this sort of thing.
a b B Homebuilt system
March 2, 2011 5:18:04 AM

Well good to hear, sorry we werent more helpful :) 
!