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Sensor Dust Removal

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Anonymous
February 5, 2005 4:54:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I finally got enough courage and had a try at removing dust from my 20D
sensor using the rocket blower method with my wife holding the vacuum
cleaner hose near the camera throat.

This was successful in the sense that it was no worse than before, better in
fact as all the darker spots had been cleaned out. However the lighter ones
remain, I don't seem to have added to these fortunately.

Test shots where at f/20.

Is it the experience of others using this method that some lighter marks
remain?

Or have I just been too cautious with the technique?

Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor brush for
these more stubborn spots.


Thanks

More about : sensor dust removal

Anonymous
February 5, 2005 6:28:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lester Wareham wrote:


> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor brush for
> these more stubborn spots.

I've read you should use sensor swabs rather than pec-pads.
(Both made by the same manufacturer). But.. I've also read that
pec-pads do work well for cleaning sensors :-)

I use sensor swabs and photosol liquid. I've had to swab my sensor
three times in the last 14 months. It's worked perfectly each time.
After swabbing, I see no dust at f/22.

Just one note.. It won't take long for the spots to start
showing up again with light featureless subjects at high f numbers..

Don't sweat it unless you regularly shoot featurless subjects at
f/16 and above.. I think learning to tolerate the odd dust spot
is a far better approach :-)
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 5:36:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jim Townsend wrote:
> Lester Wareham wrote:
>
>
>> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor
>> brush for these more stubborn spots.
>
> I've read you should use sensor swabs rather than pec-pads.
> (Both made by the same manufacturer). But.. I've also read that
> pec-pads do work well for cleaning sensors :-)
>
> I use sensor swabs and photosol liquid. I've had to swab my sensor
> three times in the last 14 months. It's worked perfectly each time.
> After swabbing, I see no dust at f/22.
>
> Just one note.. It won't take long for the spots to start
> showing up again with light featureless subjects at high f numbers..
>
> Don't sweat it unless you regularly shoot featurless subjects at
> f/16 and above.. I think learning to tolerate the odd dust spot
> is a far better approach :-)

A quick zap with the image editor's healing or cloning tool is also an
option - cheaper, and comes with an 'undo'! ;^)

Bob ^,,^
Related resources
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 1:21:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jim Townsend" <not@real.address> wrote in message
news:110ai30c5srfof9@news.supernews.com...
> Lester Wareham wrote:
>
>
>> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor brush for
>> these more stubborn spots.
>
> I've read you should use sensor swabs rather than pec-pads.
> (Both made by the same manufacturer). But.. I've also read that
> pec-pads do work well for cleaning sensors :-)
>
> I use sensor swabs and photosol liquid. I've had to swab my sensor
> three times in the last 14 months. It's worked perfectly each time.
> After swabbing, I see no dust at f/22.
>
> Just one note.. It won't take long for the spots to start
> showing up again with light featureless subjects at high f numbers..
>
> Don't sweat it unless you regularly shoot featurless subjects at
> f/16 and above.. I think learning to tolerate the odd dust spot
> is a far better approach :-)

True for general photography, I like to keep near f/8 to f/11 for max
sharpness.

I like landscape and macro though so smaller apertures are needed for dof in
these cases.

Thanks
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 2:53:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Bob Harrington" <rch.NOS-PAM@blarg.net> wrote in message
news:kvWdndF6V52sbpjfRVn-rg@giganews.com...
> Jim Townsend wrote:
>> Lester Wareham wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor
>>> brush for these more stubborn spots.
>>
>> I've read you should use sensor swabs rather than pec-pads.
>> (Both made by the same manufacturer). But.. I've also read that
>> pec-pads do work well for cleaning sensors :-)
>>
>> I use sensor swabs and photosol liquid. I've had to swab my sensor
>> three times in the last 14 months. It's worked perfectly each time.
>> After swabbing, I see no dust at f/22.
>>
>> Just one note.. It won't take long for the spots to start
>> showing up again with light featureless subjects at high f numbers..
>>
>> Don't sweat it unless you regularly shoot featurless subjects at
>> f/16 and above.. I think learning to tolerate the odd dust spot
>> is a far better approach :-)
>
> A quick zap with the image editor's healing or cloning tool is also an
> option - cheaper, and comes with an 'undo'! ;^)
>
> Bob ^,,^

Indeed.

When I ordered the 20D I naively thought - terrific no more waiting for the
film scanner and taking ages to clear up the dust spots - Ha!!

Still, it's a lot better than working in the smelly dark all day away from
everyone; and I used to enjoy darkroom work.....
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 11:57:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lester Wareham wrote:
> I finally got enough courage and had a try at removing dust from my
20D
> sensor using the rocket blower method with my wife holding the vacuum

> cleaner hose near the camera throat.
> ...

Lester,

There are several websites giving very complete and explicit
information about cleaning sensors - with photos. Search
Google for it and, hopefully, you'll get some good data.

Sealed sensors is one of the advantages that the
non-interchangeable lens "consumer" level cameras have
over the otherwise more capable dSLRs.

Alan
February 7, 2005 4:43:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lester Wareham wrote:

>
> "Jim Townsend" <not@real.address> wrote in message
>>
>> Don't sweat it unless you regularly shoot featurless subjects at
>> f/16 and above.. I think learning to tolerate the odd dust spot
>> is a far better approach :-)
>
> True for general photography, I like to keep near f/8 to f/11 for max
> sharpness.
>

So you think shooting through dust doesn't hurt anything?

--

Stacey
February 7, 2005 4:45:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Alan Meyer wrote:

>
> Sealed sensors is one of the advantages that the
> non-interchangeable lens "consumer" level cameras have
> over the otherwise more capable dSLRs.


Funny that olympus has fixed this problem and everyone else is ignoring it?
--

Stacey
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 10:00:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <anyone4tennis-94FA16.12314007022005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp>, Stewy
<anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> writes
>In article <4204d002$0$7724$fa0fcedb@news.zen.co.uk>,
> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> I finally got enough courage and had a try at removing dust from my 20D
>> sensor using the rocket blower method with my wife holding the vacuum
>> cleaner hose near the camera throat.
>>
>> This was successful in the sense that it was no worse than before, better in
>> fact as all the darker spots had been cleaned out. However the lighter ones
>> remain, I don't seem to have added to these fortunately.
>>
>> Test shots where at f/20.
>>
>> Is it the experience of others using this method that some lighter marks
>> remain?
>>
>> Or have I just been too cautious with the technique?
>>
>> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor brush for
>> these more stubborn spots.
>>
>Spittle is quite neutral as far as ph is concerned. Try extending you
>tongue with the mirror locked up and licking the sensor - whatever you
>do don't let the mirror snap back into place or your buggered...
>After wetting the sensor get a brush, any old brush will do - those
>small wire brushes for combing suede shoes are ideal. Give the sensor a
>really good buffing then dry off using the end of your necktie.

Mmmm ... My necktie is normally crusted with remnants of previous meals.
Will this help or hinder the operation, or should I use an old sock
instead?
--
Roger Hunt
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 3:31:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <4204d002$0$7724$fa0fcedb@news.zen.co.uk>,
"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:

> I finally got enough courage and had a try at removing dust from my 20D
> sensor using the rocket blower method with my wife holding the vacuum
> cleaner hose near the camera throat.
>
> This was successful in the sense that it was no worse than before, better in
> fact as all the darker spots had been cleaned out. However the lighter ones
> remain, I don't seem to have added to these fortunately.
>
> Test shots where at f/20.
>
> Is it the experience of others using this method that some lighter marks
> remain?
>
> Or have I just been too cautious with the technique?
>
> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor brush for
> these more stubborn spots.
>
Spittle is quite neutral as far as ph is concerned. Try extending you
tongue with the mirror locked up and licking the sensor - whatever you
do don't let the mirror snap back into place or your buggered...
After wetting the sensor get a brush, any old brush will do - those
small wire brushes for combing suede shoes are ideal. Give the sensor a
really good buffing then dry off using the end of your necktie.
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 10:28:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Stewy" <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:anyone4tennis-94FA16.12314007022005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp...
> In article <4204d002$0$7724$fa0fcedb@news.zen.co.uk>,
> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> I finally got enough courage and had a try at removing dust from my 20D
>> sensor using the rocket blower method with my wife holding the vacuum
>> cleaner hose near the camera throat.
>>
>> This was successful in the sense that it was no worse than before, better
>> in
>> fact as all the darker spots had been cleaned out. However the lighter
>> ones
>> remain, I don't seem to have added to these fortunately.
>>
>> Test shots where at f/20.
>>
>> Is it the experience of others using this method that some lighter marks
>> remain?
>>
>> Or have I just been too cautious with the technique?
>>
>> Should I consider an invasive method such as pec-pads or sensor brush for
>> these more stubborn spots.
>>
> Spittle is quite neutral as far as ph is concerned. Try extending you
> tongue with the mirror locked up and licking the sensor - whatever you
> do don't let the mirror snap back into place or your buggered...
> After wetting the sensor get a brush, any old brush will do - those
> small wire brushes for combing suede shoes are ideal. Give the sensor a
> really good buffing then dry off using the end of your necktie.

Thank god!!

Someone with a sensible and direct approach.

Unfortunately when I tried it the battery ran out and it took 3 hours with a
crowbar to get the shutter curtain open and release my tongue.

I will use the washing-up brush in future.....
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 10:30:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Alan Meyer" <ameyer2@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1107752268.197837.326220@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Lester Wareham wrote:
>> I finally got enough courage and had a try at removing dust from my
> 20D
>> sensor using the rocket blower method with my wife holding the vacuum
>
>> cleaner hose near the camera throat.
>> ...
>
> Lester,
>
> There are several websites giving very complete and explicit
> information about cleaning sensors - with photos. Search
> Google for it and, hopefully, you'll get some good data.
>
> Sealed sensors is one of the advantages that the
> non-interchangeable lens "consumer" level cameras have
> over the otherwise more capable dSLRs.
>
> Alan
>

The strange thing is years of working with delicate electronics, often under
a microscope, has made me very wary of any direct contact.
!