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Best CPU for ASUS P5LD2-SE

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May 27, 2011 9:08:48 AM

Hello,

What is the fastest CPU for ASUS P5LD2-SE motherboard?

More about : cpu asus p5ld2

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May 27, 2011 9:57:00 AM

Probably Intel Core2 Quad Processor Q9650 (12M Cache, 3.00 GHz, 1333 MHz FSB).

If you're thinking of upgrading through, I assume it's a pretty old computer to have that motherboard in it? I'd just go for a full system rebuild.
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May 27, 2011 10:23:40 AM

Superbank said:
Hello,

What is the fastest CPU for ASUS P5LD2-SE motherboard?



From asus website, it's a Core 2 Duo E6700 .

It's not worth it.

Build a new pc.

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May 27, 2011 11:23:22 AM

Thank you for your advice. Unfortunately my budget is limited to 100 dollars at this time. First of all I will upgrade my RAM. My current RAM is 2 GB "Dual Channel DDR2-391 SDRAM (5-6-6-18)" as classified by Lavalys EVEREST Cache @ Memory Benchmark.



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Best solution

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May 27, 2011 12:14:47 PM

Honestly, I've been down this route - and it's expensive.

Build a new machine.
If you haven't got the money to build it yet.. SAVE. Don't spend out on upgrades because within a year you'll need to upgrade again and it soon gets to the price you would have been spending on a new computer.

Save up, and in a few months build yourself a good machine.

You can get a good rig for £350 if you look about and build yourself.
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May 27, 2011 12:44:30 PM

As much as possible I am trying to avoid the clean Windows installation on a new machine. I have gone through it a few times, oh my God!

Normally I have nearly a hundred programs configured and ready to start my work immediately.

Most of them are keeping their user configuration data in the Windows system registry.

Do you know any good software that is capable of transferring all the working environment including the registry entries to the new machine with the same version of Windows XP Professional installed?

Any advice will be very much appreciated.

Thank you.
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May 27, 2011 4:18:06 PM

Norton Ghost and Acronis True Image are the two biggest SOFTWARE options to clone a full installation, although personally I've never had a successful copy with either.

I bought a HDD caddy from ebay which holds two SATA drives in 'hot-swap slots', but at the touch of a button it will also copy all data from one drive to the next - perfect 1:1 match as it's copying 1s and 0s instead of files. It's also very fast, 500GB of data in 15 minutes or so.

Personally I'd suggest taking the move to Win7 if you can - although it's a pain at first (I moved my business over to Win7 a year or two ago) the operating system is amazingly flexible and can be used in a new machine without any issues.

I built a computer, ran Win7 on it for around 6 months, before changing every component apart from the power supply and hard drive and within 2-3 reboots, my OS was running on the new machine - which is the one I'm using today.

I'm not sure of any other way of getting a new machine run on an old OS, because as soon as you're looking to move the registry over to a new machine (with XP at least) you'll start running into some issues. I have once built a new computer and had a previously installed copy of XP transfer to the new build without problems, but that's meant to be pretty rare.

Sorry I can't help more.
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May 28, 2011 4:09:38 AM

Do you mean that Windows 7 has a built-in support for cloning the full installation to another machine? Is it working flawlessly?
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May 28, 2011 9:42:56 AM

Superbank said:
Do you mean that Windows 7 has a built-in support for cloning the full installation to another machine? Is it working flawlessly?


No no sorry, I didn't put it clearly.

Win7 is very flexible when it comes to component changes.

I had a Win7 machine running for 6 months on a old M/B, Dual core and SLI 8600GTS, then I took the hard drive out and changed all components in the computer apart from my powersupply. I put the hard drive back in and booted. It took a few restarts (and driver installs), but the computer was then running on a totally new system but the same hard drive.

I'm still running that OS today, a year and a half on.
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May 28, 2011 11:54:07 AM

acer0169 said:
No no sorry, I didn't put it clearly.

Win7 is very flexible when it comes to component changes.

I had a Win7 machine running for 6 months on a old M/B, Dual core and SLI 8600GTS, then I took the hard drive out and changed all components in the computer apart from my powersupply. I put the hard drive back in and booted. It took a few restarts (and driver installs), but the computer was then running on a totally new system but the same hard drive.

I'm still running that OS today, a year and a half on.


Well, about 10 years ago I was upgrading my old motherboard (that was another computer). Then I had to make a brand-new Windows NT installation because my old boot drive refused to boot Windows NT with the new motherboard.

I was very frustrated as it happened unexpectedly. I lost all my working environment, oh my God!

Then I found some advice on the web how to export the old USER.DAT replacing the brand new USER.DAT (which contains the HKEY_CURRENT_USER part of the Windows system registry).

I successfully implanted the old USER.DAT into the new Windows NT installation and voila! Most of my old application configuration was restored.

This trick involved hacking of CLSID or GUID (the unique user ID generated randomly by Windows upon a new user is registered in the system).

I am not sure if this old trick will work with Windows XP or later.... :ouch: 


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May 28, 2011 12:30:49 PM

I've never even heard of doing it like that, so can't advise on if it would work on XP or not.

Thing is.. even if you get it working, you don't want an epic crash 2 months down the line because your OS is unstable. With XP, I read you could remove all hardware drivers - motherboard, GPU, everything.. and then it's more likely to run on a new build.

Again though, this is only to get the system working, not 100% stable.

This is why I was so pleasantly surprised with Win7 and how it allowed me to completely change the setup without having to faff around or lose my working environment (I too have 200+ programs installed, many with custom layouts etc that take forever to redo).

I'm planning on testing my cloning enclosure soon, by cloning my boot drive and then seeing if I could run it in another computer without issues. If so.. I could just always keep a clone handy, so if I ever have a PC-meltdown I could just pop it in my second machine and have everything how I left it.
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June 7, 2011 7:20:31 AM

Best answer selected by Superbank.
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June 8, 2011 10:45:14 AM

Thanks for the best answer :].
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